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OF

THE JEWS,

CAREFULLY COMPILED FROM AUTHENTIC SOURCES,

AND

THEIR CUSTOMS ILLUSTRATED

FROM MODERN TRAVELS.

BY WILLIAM BROWN, D.D.

MINISTER OF ESKDALEMUIR.

TO WHICH IS ADDED,

DISSERTATION ON THE HEBREW LANGUAGE, FROM

JENNINGS'S JEWISH ANTIQUITIES.

IN TWO VOLUMES.

VOL. II.

PHILADELPHIA:

PUBLISHED BY WILLIAM W. WOODWARD,

NO. 52, SOUTH SECOND STREET.

1823.

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KF 4288(2), pirc. 10. 1940

LEKARY

J. Howed Alloy

CONTENTS.

SECT. V. Ecclesiastical Punishments among the Jews.—The Nezipè or Admo:

nition, its nature and duration. The Nedui or Separation. The Herim or Cut-

ting on. The Shemetha or Greater Excommunication. A Copy of it 104
SECT. II. Marriages of the Jews.-Espousing ; copy of the contract; dowry

SECT. I. Habitations of the Jews. These affected by the state of society

Tents in pastoral districts described. Villages of stone in rocky situations,

and mud in plains. Fenced cities; their walls, gates, locks, wooden keys,

bolts and bars. Private winter houses of the Jews; of stone, brick, or mud :

manner of defending them from the weather. Doors often ornamented: the

hole at the side for the portion of the law. Houses in the form of a square,

with a court in the middle; their appearance plain towards the street; the

windows, lattices; their appearance towards the court beautiful. Their

chambers, kiosks, nlee or upper rooms; door to the street low; doors into

the court large. Ground Aoor for the family; principal rooms in the second

story; fire-places in the family rooms; braziers in the public apartments.

Stairs sometimes ornamented with vine ; manner of finishing their principal

rooms. Way of cooling their chambers ; furniture of rooms, carpets ;

the divan. Chambers of the poor; their beds. The beds of the rich;

their musqueto nets. Bed-chambers always lighted during the night;

often alluded to in Scripture. The summer houses of the Jews described ;

the roofs of houses flat, with battlements: their utility. The eastern

nails of houses; keys of wood described. Dr. Shaw's account of eastern

houses. Streets of eastern cities dirty in wet, and dusty in dry weather; nar.

row; the reason why. The gate of the city the most public place. Bazars;

Dr. Russell's and Mr. Kinneir's account of them. Tolls erected at the gate.

No clocks; manner of knowing the hour. Police regulations; nuisances re-

moved; water brought by conduits, tanks, or reservoirs. The pools of Solo.

mon described ; Gihon, Siloam, Jacob's well. Rights of citizenship. Roads

between city and city. Dogs at large without any owner; several texts al-

luding to this

112

given to the bride, laid out in marriage dresses; custom at Aleppo and in

Egypt. Persons in the East always marry young; young men to virgins ;

widowers to widows. The bride elegantly dressed; virgins married on the

fourth day of the week, and widows on the fifth: one divorced or a widow,

could not marry till after ninety days. The marriage procession of the bride-

groom to the house of the bride: the marriage ceremony; procession of both

parties to the house of the bridegroom: commonly in the night. The songs

and ceremonies during the procession; marriage supper; office of architri.

clinus : the paranymphi; the shushbenin. Music and dancing after supper.

Signs of virginity: consequences if they appeared not. Marriage feast lasted

eight days: that of a widow only three. The bride had commonly a slave

given her by her parents. Husbands exempted from military service for a

year; Alexander the Great did this after the battle of the Granicus. A large

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