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LONDON:
PAINTID TOR W. LOWNDES, No. 76, FLILT-STREET,

1797

Price One Shilling

TILDEN

1907 ASTOR, LENOX AND

DATION

JBLIC LIBRARY

DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.

DRURY-LANE
Mr. Palmer.
Mr. Waldron.
Mr. Phillimore.
Mr. Suet.

COVENT-GARDEN.

Mr. Wilson.
Mr. Powel.
Mr. Cubitt.
Mr. Thompfon.
Mr. Farley.

Major STURGEON,
Sir JACOB JOLLUP,
BRUIN,
Lint,
ROGER,
Мов,
SNUFFLE,
CRISPIN HEEL-TAP,
JERRY SNEAK,
Mrs. BRUIN,
Mrs. SNEAK,

HAY-MARKET.
Mr. Bannister.
Mr. Ufber.
Mr. Maddocks.
Mr. Benson.
Mr. Waldron, jun.
Mr. Cooke, &c.
Mr. Lyons.
Mr. Burton.
Mr. J. Bannister.
Miss Tidswell.
Mrs. Goodall.

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MAYOR OF GARRATT.

ACT 1. SCENE Sir Jacob's House at Garrat,

Enter Sir JACOB.

Sir Jacob.

ROGER

Enter ROGER.
Rog. Anan, Sir

Sir Jac. Sir, sirrah! and why not Sir Jacob,

you rascal? Is that all your manners? Has his Majesty dubb'd me a Knight for you to make me a Mifter? Are the candidates near upon coming ?

Rog. Nic Goose, the taylor, from Putney, they say, will be here in a crack, Sir Jacob.

Sir Jac. Has Margery fetch'd in the linen?

Rog. Yes, Sir Jacob.

Sir Jac. Are the pigs and the poultry lock'd up in the barn?

Rog. Safe, Sir Jacob.

Sir Jac, And the plate and spoons in the pantry?

Rog.

A 2

Rog. Yes, Sir Jacob.

Sir Jac. Then give me the key; the mob will soon be upon us; and all is fish that comes to their net. Has Ralph laid the cloth in the hall ?

Rog. Yes, Sir Jacob.

Sir Jac. Then let him bring out the turkey and chine, and be sure there is plenty of mustard; and, d’ye hear, Roger, do you stand yourself at the gate, and be careful who you let in.

Rog. I will, Sir Jacob. [Exit Rog.

Sir Jac. So, now I believe things are pretty secure: But I can't think what makes my daughters so late ere they

[Knocking at the gate. Who is that, Roger ?

Roger without. Master Lint, the pottercarrier, Sir Jacob.

Sir Fac. Let him in. What the deuce can he want?

Enter Lint.
Șir Fac. Well, master Lint, your will?

Lint. Why, I come, Sir Jacob, partly to enquire after your health ; and partly, as I may say, to settle the buliness of the day.

Sir Jac. What business ?

Lint. Your worship knoweth, this being the day of election, the rabble may be riotous; in which case, maims, bruises, contu

Lions,

fions, dislocations, fractures simple and compound, may likely ensue: now your wor. Thip need not be told, that I am not only a pharmacopolist, or vender of drugs, but likewise chirurgeon, or healer of wounds.

Sir Jac. True, master Lint, and equally skillful in both.

Lint. It is your worship's pleasure to say so, Sir Jacob: Is it your worship’s will that I lend a ministring hand to the inaim'd ?

Sir Jac. By all means.

Lint. And to whom must I bring in my bill?

Sir Jac. Doubtlefs, the vestry.

Lint. Your worship knows, that, kill or cure, I have contracted to phyfic the parish poor by the great : but this must be a feparate charge.

Sir Jac. No, no; all under one: come, master Lint, don't be unreasonable.

Lint. Indeed, Sir Jacob, I can hardly afford it. What with the dearnefs of drugs, and the number of patients the peace has pro cured me, I can't

get

salt to my porridge. Sir Jac. Bad this year, the better the next-We must take things rough and smooth as they run.

Lint. Indeed I have a very hard bargain.

Şir fac. No such matter; we are, neighbour Lint, a little better inftruéled. For. merly, indeed, a fit of illness was very exA 3

pensive;

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