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How great is the sin, when we use a false weight!
Our scales should be true, the beam also straight;
Our dealing be just, and the measures all true;
Be upright to all, as you'd have them to you,

TIME. 60 Seconds ...... make .. 1 Minute. 60 Minutes

.......... ........ 1 Hour. 24 Hours

................ 1 Day. 7 Days

1 Week. 4 Weeks

.... 1 Month. 12 Months

1 Calendar Year. 13 Months, 1 Day, & 6 Hours ..., 1 Julian Year. 100 Years

...... 1 Century.
52 Weeks, or 365 Days, 1 Year.

In Verse.
Sixty seconds make a minute,

Swift our time doth fly away;
Sixty minutes make an hour,

Let's improve it while we may.
Twenty-four hours make one day,

And in this our earth turns round;
Seven days make just one week,

When the Sabbath bells do sound.
Months* have each four weeks, we know ;

Time, how quiokly does it run!
Thirteen such will make a year,

While we move around the sun.

THE SEVEN DAYS OF THE WEEK.
1st Day

Sunday.
2d

Monday. ...................... Tuesday.

Wednesday. 5th

Thursday. 6th

Friday. 7th

Saturday.

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* Lunar.

THE CALENDAR MONTHS. January hath .......... 31 Days. February

99 S And once in 4

5 Years, 29 Days. March April May

June

July August September October November December

365

Sing.
Thirty days hath September,
April, June and November;
February hath twenty-eight alone,
All the rest have thirty-one;
Except leap year, at which time
February’s days are twenty-nine

January's when cold winds do blow;
February brings us frost and snow ; .
March is when young lambs do play;
April brings us flowers so gay ;
May's the time the trees are green;
June is when new hay is seen;
July's days are very warm ;
August brings the thunder storm;
September, the harvest fields are clear;
October's when they brew nice beer ;
November's dreary days are here;
December ends the fleeting year.

MULTIPLICATION TABLE IN VERSE.

(Church Bells.)
Three threes are nine, three fours are twelve,

Three fives are fifteen sure;
And three times six are just eighteen,

Which wants two of a score.
And three times seven are twenty-one,

Three eights are twenty-four;
And three times nine are twenty-seven,

Indeed it is no more.
Four fours are sixteen pretty deer,

That feed in Greenwich Park ;
And four times five are twenty lads,

Who rise up with the lark.
And four times six are twenty-four

Young lambs that skip and play ;
And four times seven are twenty-eight

Fine horses, fed with hay.
But four times eight are thirty-two ;

Four nines are thirty-six ;
And five times five are twenty-five,

Who leave off naughty tricks.
And five times six are thirty boys,

Who lose no time in play ;
And five times seven are thirty-five

Old farmers drest in grey.
Well, five times eight are forty girls,

With frocks so neat and clean;
And five times nine are forty-five

Young Scots from Aberdeen.
Now six times six are thirty-six

Light horsemen, all in blue;
Sure, all will own, that six times sev'n

Will make but forty-two.
And six times eight are forty-eight,

We here are safe from harm;
And six times nine are fifty-four,

What's useful, too, we learn.

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THE BABY'S SONG.

First.
Here's my Right Side; Here's my Left Side.
Here's my Right Knee; Here's my Left Knee.
Here's my Right Arm; Here's my Left Arm.
Here's my Right Ear; Here's my Left Ear.

This is my Mouth with which I Eat;
This is my Mouth with which I Eat.

Second.
Here's my Right Foot; Here's my Left Foot.
Here's my Right Cheek; Here's my Left Cheek.
Here's my Right Leg; Here's my Left Leg.
Here's my Right Hand; Here's my Left Hand.

These are my Shoes upon my Feet;
These are my Shoes upon my Feet.

These Lessons will be found a pleasing change for the younger children, and for whom it is principally intended.

STOPS.

In reading, Children ought to know
'Tis best to read distinct and slow.
Stops should be minded, and I'll teach
Their names, and time to rest at each.
This is a Comma, here I stay
While counting one upon my way.
The Semicolon now I view,

Here I must stop, and count one, two.
: The Colon next I here may see,

And stop while counting one, two, three.
At a Full Stop I wait still more,
While I can count one, two, three, four.
The Note of Admiration view,
Surprize or grief it shews to you;
And here I wait, as said before,

While I can count one, two, three, four.
? Notes of Interrogation shew

Questions, as this;— What do you know?
And here I wait a little more,
Than time to count one, two, three, four.
Observe these rules, and soon you'll find
Your reading please the Teacher's mind.

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