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Birth-day of Heav'n and Earth; with joy and shout:
The hollow universal orb they fillid,
And touch'd their golden harps, and hymning prais'd
God and his works, Creator him they sung,
Both when first evening was, and when first morn.

Again, God said, Let there be firmament 261
Amid the waters, and let it divide
The waters from the waters : and God made
The firmament, expanse of liquid, pure,
Transparent, elemental air, diffus'd

265 In circuit to the uttermoft convex Of this great round: partition form and sure,

The to view one after another, in fuch 261. Again. God said, &c.] When a manner, that the reader seems he makes God speak, he adheres present at this wonderful work, and closely to the words of Scripture. to affit among the quires of Angels, And God said, Let there be a firmament, who are the spectators of it. How in the midf of the waters, and let it.. glorious is the conclufion of the first divide the waters from the waterse day! Addison.

Gen. I. 6. But when he says that 256. -- with joy and shout God made the firmament he explains The hollow universal orb they fill d,] what is meant by the firmament, The Angels singing and shouting for The Hebrew word, which the Greeks joy at the creation of the world render by sepseud, and our trans. seems to be founded upon Job lators by firmament, fignifies expan. XXXVIII. 4, 7. Where waft thou foon: it is render'd expansion in the rben I laid the foundations of the margin of our bibles, and Milton tarth; when the morning fars fang rightly explains it by the expanse of together, and all the sons of God elemental air. jouted for joy? And with this joy 264.- liquid air,) Virg. Æn. VI. and thout they fill'd the hollow uni. 202. liquidumque per acra. versal orb, the great round (as it is 267. partition form and fure,] calid ver. 267.7 of the universe, For its certainty not solidity. St. bellow as being concave and having Augustin upon Genesis. It is not to creatures to inhabit it.

call'd firmament as being a solid body,

but

250

Ethereal, first of things, quintessence pure
Sprung from the deep, and from her native east 245
To journey through the aery gloom began,
Spher'd in a radiant cloud, for yet the sun
Was not; she in a cloudy tabernacle
Sojourn'd the while. God saw the light was good ;
And light from darkness by the hemisphere
Divided; light the day, and darkness night
He nam’d. Thus was the first day ev'n and morn:
Nor past uncelebrated, nor unsung
By the celestial quires, when orient light
Exhaling first from darkness they beheld;

225

Birthtators; though others think this light 249.

God saw the light was was the light of the fun, which good; &c.] What follows is shone as yet very imperfectly, and little more than the words of Moses did not appear in full lustre till the versify’d. And God saw the light that fourth day. It is most probable, it was good, and God divided ibe ligbt that by light (as it was produc'd the from the darkness: Milton adds how first day) we must not understand it was divided, by the bemisphere, the darting of rays from a luminous

And light from darkness by the body, such as do now proceed from

hemisphere the fun, but those particles of matter

Divided. which we call fiore (whose properties we know are light and beat) which And God called the light day, and the Almighty produc'd, as a proper darkness be called night;

and the eveninftrument for the preparation and ing and morning were the firft day. digestion of other matter. So Bishop Gen. I. 4, 5. Patrick upon the text. However it 253. Nor past uncelebrated, &c.] be, Milton's account is certainly very The beauties of description lie fo poetical, tho' you may not allow very thick, that it is almost impofit to be the most philosophical, and fible to enumerate them. The poet is agreeable to the description before has employ'd on them the whole quoted from Vida. See Mr. Thyer's energy of our tongue. The several note upon ver. 211.

great scenes of the creation rực up

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Birth-day of Heav'n and Earth; with joy and shout
The hollow universal orb they fillid,
And touch'd their golden harps, and hymning prais'd
God and his works, Creator him they sung,
Both when first evening was, and when first morn.

Again, God faid, Let there be firmament 261
Amid the waters, and let it divide
The waters from the waters : and God made
The firmament, expanse of liquid, pure,
Transparent, elemental air, diffus'd

265 In circuit to the uttermoft convex Of this great round: partition form and sure,

The to view one after another, in such 261. Again, God said, &c.] When a manner, that the reader seems he makes God speak, he adheres present at this wonderful work, and closely to the words of Scripture. to aflift among the quires of Angels, And God said, Let there be a firmament, who are the spectators of it. How in the midf of the waters, and let it. glorious is the conclusion of the first divide the waters from the waters. day! Addison.

Gen. I. 6. But when he says that 256. with joy and foout

God made the firmament he explains The hollow universal orb they fill d] what is meant by the firmament, The Angels singing and shouting for The Hebrew word, which the Greeks joy at the creation of the world render by sepseud, and our trans. seems to be founded upon Job lators by firmament, fignifies expanXXXVIII. 4, 7. Where waft ibou foon: it is render'd expansion in the when I laid the foundations of the margin of our bibles, and Milton earth; when the morning fars Jang rightly explains it by the expanse of together, and all the sons of God elemental air. joated for joy? And with this joy 264.- liquid air,] Virg. Æn. VI. and thout they fillid the hollow uni. 202. liquidumque per acra. verfal orb, the great round (as it is 267. partition form and furen] cali'd ver. 267.) of the universe, For its certainty not solidity. St. bollow as being concave and having Augustin upon Genesis. 1 is not to creatures to inhabit it.

call'd firmament as being a solid body,

but

The waters underneath from those above
Dividing: for as earth, so he the world
Built on circumfluous waters calm, in wide 270
Crystallin ocean, and the loud misrule
Of Chaos far remov'd, left fierce extremes
Contiguous might distemper the whole frame:
And Heav'n he nam'd the firmament: So even
And morning chorus sung the second day. 275

The but because it is a bound or term be- sembling water. Who layeth the beams tween the upper and nether waters; of his chambers in the waters. Psal. a partition firm and immoveable, not CIV. 3. Praise him ye Heavens of upon account of its station, but of its Heavens, and ye waters above the firmness and intransgresibility. Heavens. Pfal. CXLVIII. 4. To Hume and Richardson. this sense our poet agrees, and thus

infers, that as God built the earth, 268. The waters underneath from and founded it on waters (fretched those above

out the earth above the waters. Psal. Dividing :] They who understand CXXXVI. 6. By the word of God the firmament to be the vast air, ex- the Heavens were of old, and the earth panded and stretch'd out on all confifing out of the water and in the lides to the starry Heavens, esteem water. 2 Pet. III. 5.) so also he the waters above it to be those ge- establish'd the whole frame of the nerated, in the middle region of heavenly orbs, in a calm crystallin the air, of vapors exhaled and drawn sea surrounding it, left the neighup thither from the steaming earth bourhood of the unruly Chaos thou!d and nether waters; which descend difturb it. But all search in works again in such vast showers and mighty so wonderful, fo difiant and undif foods of rain, that not only rivers, cernable, as well as undemcifireble, but seas may be imaginable above, is quite confounded. Hume. as appeared when the cataraEts came down in a deluge, and the flood gales 274. And Hrau'n he non'd the of Heaven were open'd. Gen. VII.11. firmament:] So Gen. 1. 8. Others, and those many, by these And God called thr firmament Heaven. waters above understand the crystal. But it may seem ftrange if the firlin Heaven (by Gassendus made mament means the air and armosphere, double) by our author better named that the air fhould be called Heaven: cryftallin ocean, by its clearness re. but so it is frequently in the lan

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The earth was form’d; but in the womb as yet
Of waters, embryon immature involvid,
Appear'd not: over all the face of earth
Main ocean flow'd, not idle, but with warm
Prolific humor soft’ning all her globe,

280
Fermented the great mother to conceive,
Satiate with genial moisture; when God said
Be gather'd now ye waters under Heaven

Into
guage of the Hebrews and in the Be gather'd now se 'waters under
file of Scripture. In this very chap Heaven
ter; ver. 20. it is said fowl that may Into one place, and let dry land ap-
fly above the earth in the open firma. pear.] This is again exactly
ment of Heaven. So in Psal. civ. copied from Moses ; And God said,
12. By them all the fowls of the Let the waters under the Heaven be
Heaven have their habitation, which gathered together into one place, and
fing among the branches. And Mat. let the dry land appear: and it was
VI. 26. what we translate the fowls fo. Gen. I. 9. And it was so is very
of the air is in the original the fowls Thort in Moses; Milton inlarges upon
of Heaven, Te TETEVA Tou spole. it, as the subject will admit some
So again, Rev. XIX. 19. the fowls fine strokes of poetry, and seems to
sbat Hy in the midft of Heaven. And have had his eye upon the CIVth
we read often in Scripture of the Psalm, which is likewise a divine
rain of Heaven, and the clouds of hymn in praise of the creation, 6th
Heaven. The truth is there were and following verses. Thou covered
three Heavens in the account of the the earth with the deep; the waters
Hebrews. Mention is made of the stood above the mountains. At thy
third Heaven · 2 Cor. XII. 2. The rebuke they fled, at the voice of thy
firft Heaven is the air, as we have thunder they hafted away. They go
shown, wherein the clouds move up by the mountains, they go down by
and the birds fly; the second is the the valleys unto the place which thou
Starry Heaven, and the third Heaven baft founded for them, &c. We lup-
is the habitation of the Angels and pose that we need not desire the
the seat of God's glory. Milton reader to remark the beautiful num-
is speaking here of the first Heaven, bers in the following verses of the
as he mentions the others in other poem, how they seem to rise with
places.

the rising mountains, and to sink 282. God said again with the falling waters.

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285. In.

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