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the thing you wot of. He makes me no more | A fox, to be shepherd of thy lambs ; ago, but whips me out of the chamber. How Alas, pour fool! why do I pity him inany masters would do this for their servant ? That with his very beart despiseth me? Nay, I'll be sworn, 1 bave sat in the stocks for Because he loves her, he despiseth me ; puddings he hath stolen, otherwise he had been Because I love him, I must pity biu. executed : I have stood ou the pillory for geese This ring I gave bim, when he parted from be halb killed, otherwise he had suffered for't ;

me, thou think'st not of this now l-Nay, I remem- To bind him to remember my good will : ber the trick you served me, when I took my Aud bow am I (unbappy messenger) leave of madam Silvia ; did not I bid thee still To plead for that, which I would not obtaiu ; mark me, and do as I do? When didst thou see to carry that which I would have refus'd me heave up my leg, and make water against To praise his faith, which I would have disa a gentlewoman's fartingale ? didst thou ever see

prais'd. me do such a trick?

I am my master's true confirmed love ;

But cannot be true servaat to iny master,
Enter PROTEUS and Julia. Unless I prove false traitor to myself,
Pro. Sebastian is thy name? I like thee Yet I will woo for bim: but yet so coldly,
well,

As beaven, it knows, I would not bave him And will employ thee in some service presently.

speed.
Jul. In what you please ;-I will do what I
can.

Enter SILVIA, attended.
Pro. I bope thou wilt.—How now, you whore. Gentlewoman, good day! I pray you, be my
son peasant ?

[TO LAUNCE.

mean Where have you been these two days loitering?

To bring me where to speak with madam Sil. Lann. Marry, Sir, I carried inistress Silvia

via. the dog you bade me.

Sil. What would you with her, if that I be Pro. And what says she to my little jewel?

she ! Laun. Marry, she says, your dog was a cur; Jul. If you be sbe, I do entreat your paand tells you, currish thanks is good enough

tience fur sucb a present.

To hear me speak the message I am sent ou.
Pro. But she received my dog ?

Sil. From wbom
Laun. No, indeed, she did not: here bave I

Jul. From my master, Sir Proteus, madam. brongbt him back again.

Sil. 0 !-he sends you for a picture !
Pro. What, did'st thou offer ber this from

Jul. Ay, madam.
me ?

Sil. Ursula, briug my picture there.
Laun. Ay, Sir; the other squirrel was stolen

[Picture brought. from me by the hangman's boys in the market Go, give your master this : tell bin from me, place : and then I oliered ber mine own; who One Julia, that his changing thoughts forget, is a dog as big as ten of your's, and therefore would better fit his chamber than this shadow. the gist the greater.

Jul. Madam, please you peruse this letter.Pro. Go, get thee bence, and find my dog Pardon me, madanı ; I have unadvis'd Or ne'er return again into my sight. (again, Deliver'd you a paper that I should not; Away, I say : Stay'st thou to vex me here ?

Tbis is the letter to your ladyship. A slave, that, still an end,' turns me to shame.

Sil. I pray thee let me look on that agail.

[Exit LAUNCE. Jul. li may not be ; good madam, pardon me. Sebastian, I have entertained thee,

Sil. There hold. Partly, that I have need of such a youth,

I will not look upon your master's lines : That can with some discretion do my business,

I know, tbey are stufl'd with protestations, For 'tis no trusting to yon foolish lowt ;

And full of new-found oaths; which he will But, chiefly, for thy face and thy behaviour :

break Wbich (if my augury deceive me not)

As easily as I do tear his paper. Witness good bringing up, fortune, and truth :

Jul. Madam, he sends your ladyship this Therefore know thou, for this I entertain thee.

ring. Go presently, and take this ring with thee,

Sil. The more sbaine for him that he sends Deliver it to madam Silvia : She loved me well, deliver'd it to me.

For, I bave beard him say a thousand times, Jui. It seems, you loved her not, to leave her His' Julia gave it biin at his departure : token :

Though his false finger hath profan'd the ring She's dead, belike.

Mine shall not do bis Julia so much wrong.
Pro. Noi so; I think she lives.

Jul. She thanks you.
Jul. Alas!

Sil. Wbat say'st thou?
Pro. Why dost thou cry, alas?

Jul. I thank you, madam, that you tender
Jul. I cannot choose but pity ber.

her : Pro. Wherefore should'st thou pity ber?

Poor gentlewoman! my master wrongs her Jul. Because, methinks, that she loved you

much. as well

Sil. Dost thou know her ? As you do love your lady Silvia :

Jul. Alinost as well as I do know myself : She dreams on him, that tras forgot ber love ;

To think upon her woes, I do protest, You dote on her, that cares not for your love.

That I have wept a hundred several times. 'Tis pity, love should be so contrary;

Sil. Belike, she thinks that Proteus bath forAnd thinking on it makes me cry, ajas !

sook her. Pru. Well, give her that ring, and there

Jul. I think sbe doth, and that's aer cause of withal

sorrow. This letter ;-that's her chamber.- Tell my

Sil. Is she not passing fair! lady, I claim the promise for her heavenly picture.

Jub. She bath been fairer, madam, than she

is : Your message dove, hie beme unto my chamber, when she did think my master lov'd ber well, Where thou shalt tind me sad and solitary.

(Exit PROTEUS.

She, in my judgment, was as fair as you ;

But since she did neglect ber looking.glass, Jul. How many women would do such a

And threw ber sun-expelling mask away, message?

The air hath stary'd the roses in her cheeks Alas, poor Pruleus ! thou hast entertair'dj

And pinch'd the lily-tincture of her face,

That now she is become as black as I. . in the end.

Sil. How tall was she?

it me ;

For

80.

(Ezenet

Val. I was, and teld me glad of such a dooku. 704 THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA. Act IV. Duke. This weak impress of love is as a Write till your ink be dry, and with your tears figure

Moist it again ; and frame some feeling live, Trenched in ice; which with an hour's heat That may discover such integrity Dissolves to water, and doth lose his form.

Orpheus' Inte was straug with poeta A little time will melt her frozen thoughts,

sinews ; And worthless Valentine shall be forgot.

Whose golden touch could soften steel and How now, Sir Proteus ? Is your countrywan,

stones,
According to our proclamation, gone ?

Make tigers tame, and buge leviatbang
Pro. Gone, my good lord.

Forsake unsounded deeps to dauce on sende,
Duke. My daughter takes his going griev. After your dire-lamenting elegies,
ously.

Visit by night your lady's Chamber-window Pro. A little time, my lord, will kill that with some sweet concert; to their instruments grief.

l'une a deploring dump; the night's dead Duke. So I believe : but Thurio thinks not

silence

Will well become such sweet complaining
Proteus, the good conceit I hold of tbee,

grievance.
(For thou hast shown some sign of good desert,) This, or dse nothing, will inherit her.
Makes me the better to confer with thee.

Duke. This discipline shows thou hast been
Pro. Longer than I prove loyal to your grace,

in love. Let me not live to look upon your grace.

Thu. And thy advice this night I'd put in Duke. Tbou know'st, how willingly I would

practice :
effect

Therefore, sweet Proteus, my direction-giver,
The match between Sir Thurio and my daughter. Let us into the city presently
Pro. I do, my lord.

lo sort + some gentlemen well skill'd in music : Duke. And also, I think, thou art not ignorant I have a sonnet, that will serve the turn, How she opposes her against my will.

To give the onset to thy good advice.
Pro. She did, my lord, when . Valentine was Duke. About it, gentlemen.
here.

Pro. We'll wait upon your grace till after
Dike. Ay, and perversely she persévers so.

supper :
What might we do, to make the girl forget And afterward determine our proceedings
The love of Valentine, and love Sir Thurio t Duke. Even now about it; I will pardot yas.

Pro. The best way is to slander Valentine
With falsehood, cowardice, and poor descent :
Three things that women bighly Bold in hate.
Duke. Ay, but she'll think, that it is spoke in

hate.
Pro. Ay, if his enemy deliver it :

ACT IV.
Therefore it must, with circumstance, be spoken
By one, whom she esteemeth as his friend.

SCENE 1.-) Forest, near Mantua.
Duke. Then you must undertake to slander
hiin.

Enter certain OUTLAWS. Pro. And that, my lord, I shall be loath to do: 1 Out. Fellows, stand fast; I see a passenger. "Tis an ill office for a gentleman ;

2 Out. If there be len, shrink not, but down Especially, against his very friend.

with 'ein.
Duke. where your good word cannot advan.
tage bim,

Enter VALENTINE and SPEED.
Your slander never can endamage him ;

3 Out. Stand, Sir, and throw us that you have Therefore the office is indifferent, Being entreated to it by your friend.

If not, we'll make you sit, and rifle you. Pro. You have prevail'd, my lord: if I can Speed. Sir, we are undone; these are the do it,

villains By aught that I can speak in his dispraise, That all the travellers do fear so much. She sball not long continne love to him.

Val. My friends,
this weed her love from Valentine, I Out. That's not so, Sir; we are your ene.
It follows not that she will love Sir Thurio,

mjes.
Thu. Tberefore as you unwind her love from 2 Out. Peace ; we'll hear him.
him,

3 Out. Ay, by my beard, will we;
Lest it should ravel, and be good to none, For he's a proper man.
You must provide to bottom it on me :

Vad. Then know, that I have little wealtb #
Which must be done, by praising me as much A map I am, cross'd with adversity : {lovci
As you in worth dispraise Sir Valentine,

My riches are these poor babiliments, Duke. And, Proteus, we dare trust you in of which if you sbould bere disfurnish me, this kind;

You take the sum and substance that I have, Because we know, on Valentine's report,

2 Out. Whitber travel you?
You are already love's firm votary,

Val. To Verona.
And cannot soon revolt and change your mind. 1 Ort. Whence came you?
Upon this warrant shall you have access,

Val. From Milan,
Where you with Silvia may confer at large ; 3 Out. Have you long sojourned there!
For she is lumpish, heavy, melancholy,

Val. Some sixteen months; and longer might
And for your friend's sake, will be glad of have staid,
you ;

If crooked fortune had not thwarted me. Where you may temper her, by your per. 1 Out. What, were you banig'd thence i suasion,

Val, I was
To bate youug Valentine, and love my friend. 2 Out. For what offence
Pro. As much as I can do, I will effect :

Val. For that which now torrents we w
But you, Sir Thurio, are not sharp enough ;

rehearse : You must lay lime, to taugle her desires, I kill'd a man, whose death I much repent ; By wulful sonnets, whose composed rhymes But yet I slew him manfully in fighly should be full fraught with serviceable vows. Without false vantage, or base treachery. Duke. Ay, much the force of heaven-bred

1 Out. Why Be'er - repeat it, if it were done poesy. Pro. Say, that upon the altar of her beauty Britt where you banish'd for so swall a faults You sacrifice your tears, your siglas, your heart :

+ Birdlime.

• Moaraful elegy. Choom out.

about you ;

But say,

Well-locking

1

fed ;

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3 Out. Being nimble footed, he hath outrun | And that's far worse than none ; better have ns,

none But Moyses, and Valerius, follow him.

Than plural faith, which is too much by one : Go tbou with her to the west end of the wood, Thou counterfeit to tby true friend ! There is our captain : we'H follow him that's Pro. In love,

Who respects friend ! The thicket is beset, he cannot 'scape.

Sil. All men but Proteus. 1 Out. Come, I must bring you to our cap- Pro. Nay, if the gentle spirit of moving words tain's cave :

Can no way change you to a milder form, Fear not; he bears an honourable mind,

I'll woo you like a soldier, at arms' end ; Aud will not use a woman lawlessly.

And love you 'gainst the nature of love, force
Sil. O Valentine, this I endure for thee !

you.
(Exeunt. Sil. O heaven!

Pro. I'll force thee yield to my desire.
SCENE IV.-Another part of the Forest.

Val. Ruthan let go, that rude uncivil touch ;

Thou friend of an ill fashion !
Enter VALENTINE.

Pro. Valentin !

Val. Thou cuinmon friend, that's without faith Val. How use doth breed a babit in a man !

or love. This shadlowy desert, unfrequented woods, (For sucb is a friend now,) treacherons man ! I better brook than turistiug peopled towns : Thou basi beguil'd my hopes; nought but mine Here can I sit alone unsoeu of any,

eye And, to the nightingale's complaining notes, Could have persuaded me : Now I dare not Tune diy distresses, and record * my woes.

say

(me. O thou, ihat dost inhavit in my breast,

I have one friend alive ; thou would'st disprove Leave not the mansion so long tenantless ; Who should be trusted now, when one's rigbt Lest, growing ruinous, the building fall,

hand And leave no memory of what it was !

Is perjur'd to the bosom? Proteus, Repair ine with thy presence, Silvia;

I am sorry I must never trust thee more, Thou gentle nymph, cherish thy forlorn swain ! But count the world a stranger for thy sake. What balioing, and what stir, is this to-day? The private wound is deepest : O time, most These are my mates, that make their wills their

curst! law,

'Mongst all foes, that a friend should be the Have some unbappy passenger in chase :

worst ! They love me well ; yet I have much to do, Pro. My shame and guilt confounds me.To keep them from uncivil outrages.

Forgive me, Valentine : if hearty sorrow Withdraw thee, Valentine ; who's this comes Be a sufficient ransom for offence, bere?

(Steps aside. I tender it here ; I do as truly sutier,

As e'et I did commit. Enter PROTBUS, SILVIA, and JULIA. Val. Then I am paid ; Pro. Madam, this service I have done for you, And once again I do receive thee honest :(Though you respect not aught your servant Who by repentance is not satisfied, doth,)

Is nor of heaven, nor earth; for these are To hazard life, and rescue you from him

pleas'd ; That would have forc'd your honour and your By penitence the Eternal's wrath's appeas'd :love.

And, that my love may appear plain and free, Vouchsafe me, for my mecd, + but one fair look ; All that was mine in Silvia, I give thee. A smaller boon than this I cannot beg,

Jul. O me, unhappy!

(Faints. And less than this, I am sure, you cannot give. Pro. Look to the boy. Val. How like a dream is ibis I see and Val. Why boy! wby wag ! how now? what is bear!

the matter? Love, leud me patience to forbear awhile. Look up ; speak.

(A side. Jul. O good sir, my master charg'd me Sil. O miserable, unhappy that I am ! To deliver a ring madami Silvia :

Pro. Unhappy were you, madam, ere I came ; Wbich, out of my neglect was never done.
But, by my coming, I have made you happy. Pro. Where is that ring, boy?
Sil. By thy approach thou mak'st me most un- Jul. Here 'tis : this is it. (Gives a ring.
bappy.

Pro. How ! let me see :
Jul. And me, when be approacheth to your Why this is the ring I gave to Julia.
presence.

[Aside. Jul. O cry your mercy, Sir, I bave mistook ; Sil. Had I been seized by a hungry lion, This is the ring you sent to Silvia. I would have been a breakfast to tbe beast,

(Shnu's another ring. Rather than have false Proteus rescue me.

Pro. But, how cam'st thou by this ring i at O heaven be judge, how I love Valentine,

my depart, Whose life's as tender to me as my soul;

I gave this unto Julia.
And full as much (for more there cannot be,) Jul. Aud Julia berself did give it me;
I do detest false perjur'd Proteus :

And Julia herself bath brought it bither.
Therefore be gone, solicit me no more.

Pro. How! Julia ! Pro. What dangerous action, stood it next to Jul. Behold her that gave aim to all thy death,

oaths, Would I not undergo for one calın look! And entertain's them deeply in her heart : Oh ! 'tis the curse in love, and sull approv'd.. How oft bast thou with perjury cleft the root ? + Woen women cannot love where they're belov'd. O Proteus, let this habit make thee blush ! Sil. When Proiens cannot love where he's be- Be thou asham'd, that I have took opon ine lov'd.

Such an immodest raiment; if shame live
Read over Julia's beart, thy first best love, In a disguise of love :
For whose dear sake thou did'st then rend thy It is the lesser blot, modesty finds,
faith

Women to change ibeir shapes, than men their Into a thousand oaths; and all those oaths

minds. Descended into perjury, to love me.

Pro. Than men their minds ? 'tis true : 0 Thou hast no faith left now, unless thou badst

heaven! were man two,

But constant, he were perfect : that one error

1

• Sing

Reward.

i Felt, experienced.

• Direction. + An allusion to clearmeibe pin is archery

Fills him with faults ; makes hiin run through Cancel all grudge, repeal thee bome again.all sins ;

Plead a new sate in thy unrivall'd merit, Inconstancy falls off, ere it begins :

To which I thus subscribe, -Sir Valentine, What is in Silvia's face, but I may spy

Thou art a gentleman, and well deriva; More fresh in Julia's with a constant eye? Take thou thy Silvia, for thou hast deseru'd ber. Val. Come, come, a band from either :

Val. I thank your grace; the gift hath made Let me be blest to make this happy close ?

me happy. "Twere pity ewo such friends should be long foes. I now beseech you, for yoar daughter's sake, Pro. Bear witness, heaven, I have my wisb to grant one boon that I sball ask of you. for ever.

Duke. I grant it, for thine own, whate'er it be Jul. And I bave mine.

Vat. These banisb'd men, that I bave kept

witbal, Enter OCTLaws, with DUKE and TXURIO.

Are men endued with worthy qualities : Out. A prize, a prize, a prize!

Forgive them what they bave committed bere, Val. Forbear, I say ; it is my lord the duke. And let them be recall'd from their exile : Your grace is welcome to a man disgrac'd, They are reformed, civil, full of good, Banish'd Valentine !

And fit for great employment, worthy lord. Duke. Sir Valentine !

Duke. Thou hast prevail'd: I pardou the Thu. Yonder is Silvia ; and Silvia's mine.

and thee ; Val. Thurio give back, or else embrace thy Dispose of them, as thou know'st their deserts. death;

Come, let us go; we will include all jas Come not within the measure of my wrath ; With triumphs, * mirth, and rare soletanity. Do not name Silvia tbine ; if once again,

Val. And, as we walk along, I dare bebel Milan shall not behold thee. Here she stands, With our discourse to make your grace to smie : Take but possession of her with a touch ; What think you of this page, my lord! I dare thee but to breathe upon my love.

Duke. I ibink the boy bath grace la bim; be Thu. Sir Valentine, I care not for her, I;

blushes. I hold him but a fool, that will endanger

Val. I warrant you, my lord, more grace than His body for a girl that loves bim not ;

boy. I claim ber not, and therefore she is thine. Duke. What mean you by that saying?

Duke. The more degenerate and base art thou, Val. Please you, 141 tell you as we pass along, To make such means + for her as thou hasi done, that you will wonder wbat bath fortuned.And leave her on such sligbt couditions. Come, Protens ; 'uis your penance, but to bear Now, hy the honour of my ancestry,

The story of your lov es discovered: I do applaud thy spirit, Valentine,

Tbat done, our way of mariage shall be your's ; And think thee worthy of an empresss' love. One feast, one house, one mutual happiness. Know then, I here forget all former griefs, • Length of my sword.

† Masks, tereis

* Interest. • Conclude.

mean

the thing you wot of. He makes me no more | A fox, to be shepherd of thy lambs ;
ado, but whips me out of the chamber. How Alas, poor fool! why do I pily him
inany masters would do this for their servant ? That with his very beart despiseth me?
Nay, I'll be sworn, I have sat in the stocks for Because he loves her, he despiseth me;
puddings he hath stolen, otherwise he had been Because I love him, I must pity bim.
executed : I have stood ou the pillory for geese This ring I gave him, wheu de parted from
he bath killed, otherwise be had suffered for't ;

me,
thou think'st 'not of this now !-Nay, I remem- To bind him to remember my good will :
ber the trick you served me, when I took my Aud now am I (unhappy messenger)
leave of madası Silvia ; did not I bid thee still To plead for that, which I would not obtaiu ;
mark me, and do as I do? When didst thou see To carry that which I would have refus'd
me beave up my leg, and make water against To praise bis faith, which I would bave disa
a gentlewoman's fartingale didst thou ever see

prais'd. ide do such a trick

I am my master's true confirmed love ;

But cannot be true servaat to my master,
Enter PROTEUS and JULIA.

Unless I prove false traitor to myself,
Pro. Sebastiau is thy name? I like thee Yet I will woo for him : but yet so coldly,
well,

As heaven, it knows, I would not have him And will employ thee ia some service presently.

speed. Jul. In what you please ;-I will do what i

Enter SILVIA, attended. can. Pro. I bope thou wilt.-How now, you whore. Gentlewoman, good day! I pray you, be my son peasant ?

[TO LAUNCE. Where have you been these two days loitering? To bring me where to speak with madam Sil. Lann. Marry, Sir, I carried mistress Silvia

via. the dog you bade me.

Sil. What would you with her, if that I be Pro. And what says she to my little jewel ?

she ? Laur. Marry, she says, your dog was a cur ; Jul. If you be she, I do entreat your paand tells you, curtishthanks is good enough

tience for sucb a present.

To hear me speak the message I am sent oy. Pro. But sbe received my dog?

Sil. From whom Laun. No, iudeed, she did not : bere bave I

Jul. From my master, Sir Proteus, madam. brongbt hiun back again.

Sil. 0 !-be sends you for a picture ! Pro. What, did'st thou offer ber this from

Jul. Ay, madam. me ?

Sil. Ursula, bring my picture there. Larn. Ay, Sir; the other squirrel was stolen

(Picture brought,
from me by the hangman's boys in the market Go, give your master this : tell hiin from me,
place : and then I offered her mine own; who Une Julia, that his changing thoughts forget,
is a dog as big as ten of your's, and therefore would better fit bis chamber than this shadow.
the gist the greater.

Jul. Madam, please you peruse this letter.-
Pro. Go, get thee bence, and find my dog Pardon me, madam ; I have unajvis'd
Or we'er return again into my sight. (again, Deliver'd you a paper that I should not ;
Away, I say : Stay'st thou to vex me here? This is the letter to your ladyship.
A slave, that, still an end, turns me to shame.

Sil. I pray thee let me look on that again.

(Exit LAUNCE. Jul. Ji may not be ; good madam, pardon nie. Sebastian, I have entertained thee,

Sil. There hold. Partly, that I have need of such a youth,

I will not look upon your master's lines : That can with some discretion do my business, I know, tbey are stuff'd with protestations, For 'tis no trusting to yon foolish lowt ;

And full of new-found oaths ; which he will Bul, chiefly, for thy face and thy behaviour :

break Which (if my augury deceive me not)

As easily as I do tear his paper.
Witness good bringing up, fortune, and truth : Jul. 'Madam, he sends your ladysbip this
Therefore know thou, for this I entertain thee.

ring.
Go presently, and take this ring with thee, Sil. The more shaine for him that he sends
Deliver it to madam Silvia :

it me ; She loved me well, deliver'd it to me.

For, I have heard him say a thousand times, Jué. It seems, you loved her not, to leave her His Julia gave it hiin at his departure :

Though his false finger hath profan'd the ring She's dead, belike.

Mine shall not do bis Julia so inuch wrong. Pro. Noi so; I think she lives.

Jul. She thanks you.

Sil. What say'st thou ? Pro. Why dost thou cry, alas?

Jul. I thank you, madam, that you tender Jul. I cannot choose but pity her.

her : Pro. Wherefore should'st thou pity ber?

Poor gentlewoman! my master wrongsber Jul. Because, methinks, that she loved you

much. as well

.

token :

Jul. Alas!

1

Sil. Dost thou know her? As you do love your lady Silvia :

Jul. Almost as well as I do know myself : She dreams on him, that tras forgot her love ; To think upon her woes, I do protest, You dote on her, that cares not for your love. That I have wept a hundred several times. 'f'is priy, love should be so contrary; And thinaing on it makes me cry, alas !

Sil. Belike, she thinks that Proteus hath for

sook her. Pro. Well, give her that ring, and there Jul. I think she doth, and that's aer cause of withal

sorrow. This letter ;-that's her chamber.– Tell my

Sil. Is she not passing fair ? claim the promise for her heavenly picture.

Jul. She bath been fairer, madam, than she

is : Your message done, hie heme unto my chamber, When she did think my master lov'd ber well, Wbere thou shalt tind me sad and solitary.

[Exit PROTEUS. But since she did neglect ber looking-glass,

She, in my judgment, was as fair as you ; Jul. How many women would do such a

And threw her sun-expelling mask away, message ?

The air hath starv'd the roses in her cheeks Alas, poor Proteus ! thou hast entertaire'd

And pincb'd the lily-tincture of her face,

That now site is become as black as I. • In the cad.

Sil. How tall way she ?

lady,

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