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xxv. THE CITY AND THE CITIZENS . . . . . 231

XXVI. EMINENT PERSONS BORN IN LONDON . . . . . 247

xxvII. EMINENT Persons BURIED IN LONDON AND VICINITY .248

xxvIII. HOUSES IN WHICH EMINENT PERSONS HAVE LIVED . . 252

xxix. STREETS, &c., (HOUSES UNKNOWN OR NOT STANDING) IN

WHICH EMINENT MEN HAVE LIVED . . . 256

xxx. PLACES AND SITES CONNECTED WITH REMARKABLE

Events . . . . . . . . . . 257

XXXI. OUT-DOOR MONUMENTS AND PUBLIC STATUES ., .261

XXXII. PRINCIPAL THOROUGHFARES, SQUARES, AND LANES .263

Pall-Mall . . . . 264 | Grosvenor-place . . . 287

Piccadilly . . . . 266 Park-lane . . . . . 288

St. James's-street . . 271 Newgate-street . . . 289

Regent-st. and Waterloo-pl. 272 Aldersgate-street. . . 290

Holborn . . . . . 274 Fish-st-Hill, Gracechurch-st.

Strand . . . . 276 and Bishopsgate-street . 291

Fleet-street . . . . 277 Upper and Lower Thames-st. 292

Cheapside and Poultry . 278 High-street, Southwark . 293

Cornhill . . . . 280 The Thames . . . 294

Drury-lane . . . . 281 | Belgrave-sq., Grosrenor-sq. 299

Chancery-lane . . .282 | Berkeley-sq., Portman-sq. 300

Oxford-st., New-rd., City-rd. 283 St. James's-sq., Hanover-sq. 301

Bow-street, Covent Garden . 284 Cavendish-sq., Leicester-sq. 302

Great Queen-st., Lincoln’s. Soho-sq., Bloomsbury-sq. 303

Inn-Fields . . . 284 | Bedford-sq., Russell-sq. . 304

Charing Cross to Westmin. Covent-Garden Market, Lin.

ster Abbey . . 281 coln's-Im-Fields. . 305

Haymarket . . . . 286 | Trafalgar-square . . . 306

XXXIII. INDEX . . . . . . . . . . 907

List of Plans and Maps.
Hyde Park . . . . 28 Tower of London. , . 85
St. James's Park . . . 30 | Westminster Abbey . . . 99
Regent's Park . . . 33 St. Paul's Cathedral . . 115
The New Houses of Parlia British Museum ., . . 152

ment . . . . 37' „ „ Reading Room 165
Bank of England, and Onices Clue-Map of London at the

for Dividends, &c. . [2 Eud.

INTRODUCTORY INFORMATION.

1. Situation and Fogs minster to Lon-, 27. To the Sculptor. 2. Population

and

don, Bridges. 28. To the Architect Traffic. 15. The Thames-from

and Engineer. 3. Consumption of London Bridge

Food, Coal, to Gravesend. 29. To the Antiqua-
Clothes, &c. &c. 16. The Thames -

rian.

from Hampton 4. Political and Mu

30. Places and Sights

Court to Westnicipal Divisions.

which a Stranger

minster Bridge. 5. Social Divisions

must see.
7. General Hints to
the West End.

Strangers. The

31. Environs of Lon6. The City.

Season.

don. 7. Great Thorough- 18. Cabs.

32. Hints to Fo. fares running East and West. 19. Omnibuses.

reigners. 8. Ditto running 20. Letters.

33. Newspapers. North and South. / 21. HOTELS INNS — 34. Sunday Services 9. Railway Stations.

Lodgings.

and Popular 10. How to see London

22. Where to Lunch, Preachers. quickly.

Dine, or Sup.

35. Studios of the Prin11. How to see London | 23. Theatres and Ope

cipal Artists. leisurely. 12. Its great Architec

36. Metropolitan Im24. Miscellaneous tural Centres.

provements.

Exhibitions. 13. The Parks.

37. London and Sub14. The Thames-its 25. Music.

urban Railways Quays (Embank 5. Objects of Interest

- Metropolitan, nient), Steamers,

to the Painter Underground, Piers from Westand Connoisseur.

Circuit.

ras.

LONDON, the Metropolis of Great Britain and Ireland, is

situated upon the River Thames, about fifty miles from its mouth; the northern and larger portion lying in the counties of Middlesex and Essex, the southern in Surrey and Kent. By the Metropolis Local Management Act of 1855 (18 & 19 Vict. c. 120) the Metropolis is held to include the cities and liberties of London and Westminster, the borough of Southwark, and the parishes, precincts, townships, and places mentioned in a Schedule attached to the Act, including among others the extreme points of Hampstead, Islington, Stoke Newington, and Hackney to the north;

Stratford le Bow, Limehouse, Deptford, Greenwich, Woolwich, Charlton, and Plumstead to the east; Camberwell and Streatham to the south; and Kensington, Fulham, Hammersmith, and Putney to the west. The site is generally healthy, the subsoil being, for the most part, gravel. The Fogs which occur in winter, especially in November, are due, mainly perhaps, to the large expanse of water in the Thames being, often at that season, warmer than the air, and giving forth vapour until the air is densely charged. If the atmosphere be still, on such occasions, the smoke from so many thousand chimneys is absorbed by the suspended vapour, and at times becomes so thick a cloud as to involve London in darkness even at midday. A moderate wind rising speedily disperses the fog, which has no dangerous unwholesome qualities, however disagreeable it may be.

§ 2. The population of London, including the 40 or 50 hamlets and villages once separate, now absorbed in it, according to the last census, was 2,803,034.

§ 3. The Metropolis is supposed to consume in one year 1,600,000 quarters of wheat, 240,000 bullocks, 1,700,000 sheep, 28,000 calves, and 35,000 pigs. One market alone (Leadenhall) supplies about 4,025,000 head of game. This, together with 3,000,000 of salmon, irrespective of other fish and flesh, is washed down by 43,200,000 gallons of porter and ale, 2,000,000 gallons of spirits, and 65,000 pipes of wine. To fill its milk and cream jugs, 13,000 cows are kept. To light it at night, 360,000 gas-lights fringe the streets, consuming, every 24 hours, 13,000,000 cubic feet of gas. Its arterial or water system supplies the enormous quantity of 44,383,328 gallons per day, while its venous or sewer system carries off 9,502,720 cubic feet of refuse. To warm its people and to supply its factories, a fleet, amounting to upwards of a thousand sail, is employed in bringing annually 3,000,000 tons of coal,* exclusive of 2,000,000 tons brought by rail. The smoke of this immense quantity of coal has been often traced as far as Reading, 32 miles' distance. At Slough it was often so dense that the elder Herschel was unable to take observations. The thirsty souls of London need bave

* See CoaL EXCHANGE.

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