Principles of Political Economy

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D. Appleton, 1887 - 670 стор.
 

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Pragmatic or muddled? Mill sets out to explore economic principles but, ultimately, finds that there is no principle which doesn't have any amount of conceivable exceptions. You have to wonder why its ... Читати огляд повністю

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i Chapter IV Fundamental Propositions respecting Capital
74
t joverunient expenditure by loans
83
Effects of defraying government expenditure by loans
87
4 tb was idvTp til8 wtoo at the Kipesseof Circuiting might
93
Fixed and Circulating Capital what
94
t vtK oaass rf tutvrimr priuvQss
99
General causes of superior productiveness
100
Production on a large and production on a small scale
108
Countries of Europe
114
tSr U vt ys
115
Movement of Population Center westward
116
Motive for saving in the strength of the effective desire of accumula
122
Of the Law of the Increase of Production from Land
130
3 in railways
136
Receipts Expenses and Profits of all Railways in the State of New York
137
Miles of Railroad in Operation and Miles added each Year in the United States
138
Proportion of Miles of Railroad to the Square Mile in the United States and Europe face
140
in manufactures
141
Remedies for weakness of the principle of accumulation
144
nor by emigration
150
BOOK II
152
Of Property
156
Individual Property and its opponents
158
Of Wages
175
Examination of some popular opinions respecting wages
183
5 Due restriction of population the only safeguard of a laboringclass
190
would require as a condition legal measures for repression of popu
196
Twofold means of elevating the habits of the laboringpeople by edu
202
different employments
205
Wages of women why lower than those of men
213
General tendency of profits to an equality
220
The rate of profit depends on the Cost of Labor
226
Of Rent
232
Opposing views to the law of rent
240
Definitions of Value in Use Exchange Value and Price
249
Miscellaneous cases falling under this law
257
Ultimate Analysis of Cost of Production
264
When profits vary from employment to employment or are spread
272
Such commodities when produced in circumstances more favorable
279
Resumi of the laws of value of each of the three classes of commodi
285
Money a mere contrivance for facilitating exchanges which docs
293
the bullion contained in it
302
Production of Gold and Silver
307
This law how related to the principle laid down in the preceding
309
The use of the two metals as money and the management of Subsidi
315
Relative Values of Gold and Silver
318
Credit not a creation but a transfer of the means of production
325
The supply of commodities in general can not exceed the power
366
Of some Peculiar Cases of Value
372
Cost of Production not a regulator of international values Extension
379
not in a vent for exports nor in the gains of merchants
386
The values of foreign commodities depend not upon Cost of Produc
392
The cost to a country of its imports depends not only on the ratio
402
exchange
404
Exports and Imports of Specie from and into the United States
408
Of the Foreign Exchanges
410
Of the Distribution of the Precious Metals through
418
The precious metals as money are of the same value and distribute
426
Effect of the increase of an inconvertible paper currency Real
437
Circumstances which determine the fluctuations
444
Cotton Crops under Free and Slave Labor
459
Exchange and money make no difference in the law of wages
465
Influence of the Progress of Industry and Population
475
4 that tendency from time to time counteracted by improvements
484
The arts of production advancing capital and population stationary
491
Changes in the Rank of the States in respect of Population
495
Of the Tendency of Profits to a Minimum
497
In old and opulent countries profiu habitually near to the minimum 001
504
Grain Crops of the United States
509
by the emigration of capital
510
In opulent countries the extension of machinery not detrimental
512
The possibility of improvement whilc laborers remain merely receivers
518
Comparison of Wages and Production in CottonMills 18301884 face
519
Comparison of Spindles Capital etc in CottonMills 1840
520
Distributive Cooperation 023
524
Peoples Banks
532
Grounds of the principle of Equality of Taxation
539
The increase of the rent of land from natural causes a fit subject
546
on wages
553
Of Taxes on Commodities or Indirect Taxes
562
how modified by the tendency of profits to a minimum
568
Effects produced on international exchange by duties on exports
574
Comparison between Direct and Indirect Taxation
583
Taxation systems of the United States and other countries
590
Of a National Delt
596
In what cases desirable to maintain a surplus revenue for the redemp
602
Reduction of National Debts in Various Countries
604
Of an Interference of Government grounded on Erro
605
on the ground of encouraging young industries colonial policy
612
Occupations of People of the United States
619
on the ground of creating a diversity of industries
621
Appendix I
631
Appendix II
637
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Сторінка 507 - Hitherto it is questionable if all the mechanical inventions yet made have lightened the day's toil of any human being. They have enabled a greater population to live the same life of drudgery and imprisonment, and an increased number of manufacturers and others to make fortunes. They have increased the comforts of the middle classes. But they have not yet begun to effect those great changes in human destiny which it is in their nature and in their futurity to accomplish.
Сторінка 599 - The only case in which, on mere principles of political economy, protecting duties can be defensible, is when they are imposed temporarily (especially in a young and rising nation) in hopes of naturalizing a foreign industry, in itself perfectly suitable to the circumstances of the country.
Сторінка 103 - Those ten persons, therefore, could make among them upwards of forty-eight thousand pins in a day. Each person, therefore, making a tenth part of forty-eight thousand pins, might be considered as making four thousand eight hundred pins in a day.
Сторінка 103 - I have seen a small manufactory of this kind, where ten men only were employed, and where some of them consequently performed two or three distinct operations. But though they were very poor, and therefore but indifferently accommodated with the necessary machinery, they could, when they exerted themselves, make among them about twelve pounds of pins in a day.
Сторінка 161 - sacredness of property" is talked of, it should always be remembered, that any such sacredness does not belong in the same degree to landed property. No man made the land. It is the original inheritance of the whole species. Its appropriation is wholly a question of general expediency. When private property in land is not expedient, it is unjust.
Сторінка 507 - If the earth must lose that great portion of its pleasantness which it owes to things that the unlimited increase of wealth and population would extirpate from it...
Сторінка 579 - The schoolboy whips his taxed top; the beardless youth manages his taxed horse, with a taxed bridle, on a taxed road ; and the dying Englishman, pouring his medicine, which has paid...
Сторінка 20 - M'CULLOCH. -A TREATISE ON THE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICAL INFLUENCE of TAXATION and the FUNDING SYSTEM.
Сторінка 156 - If, therefore, the choice were to be made between Communism with all its chances, and the present state of society with all its sufferings and injustices; if the institution of private property...
Сторінка 195 - What we find, in effect, is, not a whole population competing indiscriminately for all occupations, but a series of industrial layers, superposed on one another, within each of which the various candidates for employment possess a real and effective power of selection, while those occupying the several strata are, for all purposes of effective competition, practically isolated from each other.

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