The Complete Works of William Shakespeare, Томи 1 – 2

Передня обкладинка
Ginn, Heath, & Company, 1883

Відгуки відвідувачів - Написати рецензію

Awesome complete edition

Рецензія користувача  - Linda N. - Overstock.com

Beautifuly bound books with cover proud to read and display. Читати огляд повністю

Вибрані сторінки

Інші видання - Показати все

Загальні терміни та фрази

Популярні уривки

Сторінка 69 - From women's eyes this doctrine I derive: They sparkle still the right Promethean fire ; They are the books, the arts, the academes, That show, contain, and nourish all the world...
Сторінка 48 - What things have we seen Done at the Mermaid! heard words that have been So nimble and so full of subtle flame, As if that every one from whence they came Had meant to put his whole wit in a jest And had resolved to live a fool the rest Of his dull life!
Сторінка 37 - O, for my sake do you with Fortune chide, The guilty goddess of my harmful deeds, That did not better for my life provide Than public means which public manners breeds. Thence comes it that my name receives a brand, And almost thence my nature is subdued To what it works in, like the dyer's hand...
Сторінка 68 - The applause! delight! the wonder of our stage! My Shakespeare rise! I will not lodge thee by Chaucer, or Spenser, or bid Beaumont lie A little further, to make thee a room: Thou art a monument without a tomb, And art alive still while thy book doth live And we have wits to read, and praise to give.
Сторінка 221 - Our purses shall be proud, our garments poor; For 'tis the mind that makes the body rich ; And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds, So honour peereth in the meanest habit. What, is the jay more precious than the lark, Because his feathers are more beautiful ? Or is the adder better than the eel, Because his painted skin contents the eye ? Oh no, good Kate ; neither art thou the worse For this poor furniture and mean array.
Сторінка 109 - A jest's prosperity lies in the ear Of him that hears it, never in the tongue Of him that makes it...
Сторінка 69 - The merry Greek, tart Aristophanes, Neat Terence, witty Plautus, now not please, But antiquated and deserted lie, As they were not of Nature's family. Yet must I not give Nature all; thy art, My gentle Shakespeare, must enjoy a part. For though the poet's matter nature be, His art doth give the fashion; and, that he Who casts to write a living line, must sweat (Such as thine are) and strike the second heat 60 Upon the Muses...
Сторінка 72 - For whilst, to the shame of slow-endeavouring art, Thy easy numbers flow, and that each heart Hath, from the leaves of thy unvalued book, Those Delphic lines with deep impression took, Then thou, our fancy of itself bereaving, Dost make us marble, with too much conceiving; And, so sepulchred in such pomp dost lie...
Сторінка 111 - When shepherds pipe on oaten straws And merry larks are ploughmen's clocks, When turtles tread, and rooks, and daws, And maidens bleach their summer smocks, The cuckoo then, on every tree, Mocks married men ; for thus sings he, Cuckoo; Cuckoo, cuckoo: O word of fear, 920 Unpleasing to a married ear!
Сторінка 30 - The love I dedicate to your Lordship is without end; whereof this pamphlet without beginning is but a superfluous moiety. The warrant I have of your Honourable disposition, not the worth of my untutored lines, makes it assured of acceptance.

Бібліографічна інформація