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agony before death comes to their relief. In Roman Catholic countries the murderer expiated his crime upon the rack.

Several writers on crimes and punishments deny the right of man to take away life, given to us by God alone; but a crime of the dreadful nature of that now before us, however sanguinary they may find our laws in regard to lesser offences, unquestionably calls loudly for death.

Whosoever sheddeth man's blood, by mao shall his blood be shed,' saith Holy Writ; but with the life of the murderer should the crime be fully expiated? The English law on this head goes still further : the effects of the murderer revert to the State—thus, as it were, carrying punishment beyond the grave, and involving in its consequences the utter ruin of many a virtuous widow and innocent children, who had looked up alone to it for support. Yet we may be thankful for laws, the dread of which affords us such ample security for our lives and property, and which we find administered with rigorous impartiality, award. ing the same punishment for the same offence, whether the culprit be rich or poor, humblé in life or exalted in rank. In proof of this we need only refer our readers to the cases of Laurence Earl Ferrers, Doctor Dodd, the Perreaus, Ryland, and many others, whose lives are re. corded in these pages.

It is the opinion of an able commentator on our criminal laws that punishment should succeed the crime as immediately as possible, if we intend that, in the rude minds of the multitude, the picture of the crime shall instantly awaken the attendant idea of punishment: delaying which, serves only to separate these two ideas; and thus affects the minds of the spectators rather as a terrible sight than the necessary consequences of a crime. The horror should contribute to heighten the idea of the pu. nishment.

Next to the necessary example of punishment to offenders is to record examples, in order that such as are unhappily moved with the sordid passion of acquiring wealth by violence, or stimulated by the heinous sin of revenge to shed the blood of a fellow-creature, may have before them a picture of the torment of mind and bodily sufferings of such offenders. In this light THE NEWGATE CALENDAR must prove highly acceptable to all ranks and conditions of men ; for we shall find, in the course of these volumes, that crime has always been followed by punishment; and that, in many instances, the most artful secrecy could not screen the offenders from detection, nor the utmost ingenuity shield them from the strong arm of impartial justice.

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THE REV. THOMAS HUNTER, EXECUTED FOR TIE MURDER OF TWO CUILDREN, SONS OF MR. GORDON.

The criminal recorder has too of his own pupils, the sons of his often to detail the atrocity of am- benefactor !-the soul recoils with bition, the malignity of revenge, horror, and we shudder at the want and the desperation of jealousy; of religious principle evinced in the but the perpetrators are generally deed; for this criminal subsequentconfioed to the abandoned and irre- ly avowed himself an Atheist. ligious—the illiterate and intempe- The Rev. Thomas Hunter was rate. Their follies or former crimes born in the county of Fife, in Scot. account in some measure for their land, and was the son of a rich far. delinquency, and we lament their mer, who sent him to the Univerwant of virtue and education; but, sity of St. Andrew for education. when we meet in the criminal cata. When he had acquired a sufficient logue with a culprit like the pre- share of classical learning he was sent-a man of education and a mi. admitted to the degree of Master of nister of the Gospel-guilty of a Arts, and began to prosecute his premeditated murder-the murder studies in divinity with no small de

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agony before death comes to their relief. In Roman Catholic countries the murderer expiated his crime upon the rack.

Several writers on crimes and punishments deny the right of man to take away life, given to us by God alone ; but a crime of the dreadful nature of that now before us, however sanguinary they may find our laws in regard to lesser offences, unquestionably calls loudly for death. 6 Whosoever sheddeth man's blood, by man shall his blood be shed,' saith Holy Writ; but with the life of the murderer should the crime be fully expiated? The English law on this head goes still further : the effects of the murderer revert to the State-thus, as it were, carrying punishment beyond the grave, and involving in its consequences the utter ruin of many

virtuous widow and innocent children, who had looked up alone to it for support. Yet we may be thankful for laws, the dread of which affords us such ample security for our lives and property, and which we find administered with rigorous impartiality, award. ing the same punishment for the same offence, whether the culprit be rich or poor, humblé in life or exalted in rank. In proof of this we need only refer our readers to the cases of Laurence Earl Ferrers, Doc. tor Dodd, the Perreaus, Ryland, and many others, whose lives are re. corded in these pages.

It is the opinion of an able commentator on our criminal laws that punishment should succeed the crime as immediately as possible, if we intend that, in the rude minds of the multitude, the picture of the crime shall instantly awaken the attendant idea of punishment: delaying which, serves only to separate these two ideas; and thus affects the minds of the spectators rather as a terrible sight than the necessary consequences of a crime. The horror should contribute to heighten the idea of the pu. nishment.

Next to the necessary example of punishment to offenders is to record examples, in order that such as are unhappily moved with the sordid passion of acquiring wealth by violence, or stimulated by the heinous sin of revenge to shed the blood of a fellow-creature, may have before them a picture of the torment of mind and bodily sufferings of such offenders. In this light THE NEWGATE CALENDAR must prove highly acceptable to all ranks and conditions of men ; for we shall find, in the course of these volumes, that crime has always been followed by punishment; and that, in many instances, the most artful secrecy could not screen the offenders from detection, nor the utmost ingenuity shield them from the strong arm of impartial justice.

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THE REV. THOMAS HUNTER,
EXECUTED FOR TIE MURDER OF TWO CHILDREN, SONS OF MR. GORDON.

The criminal recorder has too of his own pupils, the sons of his often to detail the atrocity of am. benefactor!-the soul recoils with bition, the malignity of revenge, horror, and we shudder at the want and the desperation of jealousy; of religious principle evinced in the but the perpetrators are generally deed; for this criminal subsequentconfined to the abandoned and irre- ly avowed himself an Atheist. ligious—the illiterate and intempe- The Rev. Thomas Hunter was rate. Their follies or former crimes born in the county of Fife, in Scotaccount in some measure for their land, and was the son of a rich fardelinquency, and we lament their mer, who sent him to the Univerwant of virtue and education; but, sity of St. Andrew for education. when we meet in the criminal cata. When he had acquired a sufficient logue with a culprit like the pre- share of classical learning he was sent—a man of education and a mi. admitted to the degree of Master of nister of the Gospel-guilty of a Arts, and began to prosecute his premeditated murder !-the murder studiсs in divinity with no small deVOL. I.

B

gree of success. Several of the vant was directed to quit the house younger clergymen act as tutors to on the following day; but Hunter wealthy and distinguished families was continued in the family, after till a proper period arrives for their making a proper apology for the entering into orders, which they crime of which he had been guilty, never do till they obtain a bencfice. attributing it to the thoughtlessness While in this rank of life they bear of youth, and promising never to the name of chaplains; and in this offend in the same way again. station Hunter lived about two From this period he entertained years in the house of Mr. Gordon, the most inveterate hatred to all the a very eminent merchant, and one children, on whom he determined, of the bailies of Edinburgh, which in his own mind, to wreak the most is a rank equal to that of alderman diabolical vengeance. Nothing less of London.

than murder was his intention; but Mr. Gordon's family consisted of it was a considerable time after he himself, his lady, two sons, and a had formed this horrid plan before daughter, and a young woman who he bad an opportunity of carrying attended Mrs. Gordon and her it into execution. Whenever it was daughter; the malefactor in ques- a fine day he was accustomed to tion, some clerks, and menjal ser- walk in the fields, with his pupils, vants. To the care of Hunter was for an hour before dinner; and, in committed the education of the two these excursions, the young lady gesons; and, for a considerable time, nerally attended her brothers. At he discharged his duty in a manner the period immediately preceding highly satisfactory to the parents, the commission of the fatal act, Mr. who considered him as a youth of Gordon and his family were their superior genius and great goodness country retreat, very near Edin. of heart. Unfortunately, a con. burgh; and, baving received an in. nexion took place between Hunter vitation to dine in that city, he and and the young woman, which soon his lady proposed to go thither increased to a criminal degree, and about the time that Hunter usually was maintained, for a considerable took his noon-tide walk with the time, without the knowledge of the children. Mrs. Gordon was very family. One day, however, when anxious for all the children to acMr. and Mrs. Gordon were on a company them on this visit; but visit, Hunter and this girl met in this was strenuously opposed by her their chamber, as usual; but, having husband, who would consent that been so incautious as not to make only the little girl should attend their door fast, the children went them. into the room, and found them in By this circumstance Hunter's such a situation as could not admit intention of murdering all the three of any doubt of the nature of their children was frustrated; but he held intercourse. No suspicion was en. the resolution of destroying the tertained that these children would boys, while they were yet in his mention to their parents what had power. With this view he took happened, the eldest boy being not them into the fields, and sat down, quite ten years of age; but, when the as if to repose himself on the grass, children were at supper with their and was preparing his knife to put parents, they disclosed so much as a period to the lives of the children left no room to doubt of what had at the very moment they were bu. passed. Hereo pon the female ser- sicd in catching butterflies, and ga

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