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Christ's Departure from Galilee.

MATTHEW, XIX, XX. Of the Labourers in the Vineyard. demanded. till he should pay all that was due unto these? they would naturally ask; and this our Lord him. 35. So likewise-in this spirit, or on this prin proceeds to tell them in three particulars. 12. For ciple, shall my heavenly Father do also unto you, if ye there are some eunuchs, which were so born from their from your hearts forgive not every one his brother their mother's womb - persons constitutionally either in. trespasses.

capable of or indisposed to marriage ; and there are CHAPTER XIX.

some eunuchs, which were made eunuchs of men-persons Ver. 1-12. FINAL DEPARTURE FROM GALILEE rendered incapable by others; and there be eunuchs, DIVORCE. (=Mark, 10. 1-12; Luke, 9. 61.)

which have made themselves eunuchs for the kingdom of Farercell to Galilee. 1. And it came to pass, that when heaven's sake-persons who, to do God's work better. Jesus had finished these sayings, he departed from Gali- deliberately choose this state. Such was Paul (1 Colee. This marks a very solemn period in our Lord's rinthians, 7. 7). He that is able to receive it, let him public ministry. So slightly is it touched here, and receive it-'He who feels this to be his proper vocain the corresponding passage of Mark (10. 1), that tion, let him embrace it;' which, of course, is as few readers probably note it as the Redeemer's Fare much as to say_'he only.' Thus, all is left free in well to Galilee, which however it was. See on the this matter. sublime statement of Luke (9. 51), which relates to 13-15. LITTLE CHILDREN BROUGHT TO CHRIST. the same transition-stage in the progress of our Lord's (=Mark, 10. 13-16; Luke, 18. 15-17.) For the exposition, work and came into the coasts-or "boundaries' see on Luke, 18. 15-17. of Judea beyond Jordan-i.e., to the further, or east 16-30. THE RICH YOUNG RULER. =Mark, 10. side of the Jordan, into Perea, the dominions of Herod 17-31; Luke, 18. 18-30.) For the exposition, see on Antipas. But though one might conclude from our | Luke, 18. 18-30. Evangelist that our Lord went straight from the one

CHAPTER XX. region to the other, we know from the other Gospels | Ver. 1-16. PARABLE OF THE LABOURERS IN THE that a considerable time elapsed between the depar VINEYARD. This parable, recorded only by Matture from the one and the arrival at the other, during thew, is closely connected with the end of ch, 19., which many of the most important events in our being spoken with reference to Peter's question, Lord's public life occurred-probably a large part of | How it should fare with those who, like himself, what is recorded in Luke, 9. 61, onwards to ch. 18. had left all for Christ? It is designed to show that 15, and part of John, 7. 2-11. 64. 2. And great multi- / while they would be richly rewarded, a certain equity tudes followed him; and he healed them there. Mark would still be observed towards later converts and says further (10. 1), that "as He was wont, He taught workmen in His service. 1. For the kingdomn of heaven them there.” What we now have on the subject of is like unto a man that is an householder, &c. The Divorce is some of that teaching,

figure of a Vineyard, to represent the rearing of souls Divcore (v. 3-12). 3. Is it lawful for a man to put away for heaven, the culture required and provided for his wife for every cause! Two rival schools (as we saw that purpose, and the care and pains which God takes on ch. 6. 3) were divided on this question-a delicate in that whole matter, is familiar to every reader of one, as DE WETTE pertinently remarks, in the do- the Bible. (Psalm 80. 8-16; Isaiah, 6. 1-7; Jeremiah, minions of Herod Antipas. 4. And he answered and | 2. 21: Luke, 20. 9-16; John, 15. 1-8.) At vintage-time, said unto them, Have ye not read, that he which made ) as WEBSTER & WILKINSON remark, labour was them at the beginning made them male and female-or scarce, and masters were obliged to be early in the better, perhaps. He that made them made them market to secure it. Perhaps the pressing nature of from the beginning a male and a female.' 5. And the work of the Gospel, and the comparative paucity said, For this cause-to follow ont this divine appoint. I of labourers, may be incidentally suggested, ch. 9. ment. shall aman leave father and mother, and shall | 37. 38. The "labourers," as in ch. 2. 38, are first, the cleave to his wife: and they twain shall be one flesh? &c. official servants of the Church, but after them and Jesus here sends them back to the original constitu- | along with them all the servants of Christ, whom he tion of man as one pair, a male and a female; to their has laid under the weightiest obligation to work in marriage, as such, by divine appointment; and to the His service. 2. And when he had agreed with the la. purpose of God, expressed by the sacred historian, bourers for a penny-a usual day's hire (the amount of that in all time one man and one woman should by which will be found in the margin of our Bibles), he marriage become one flesh-so to continue as long sent them into his vineyard. 3. And he went out about as both are in the flesh. This being God's constitu- the third hour-about nine o'clock, or after a fourth tion, let not man break it up by causeless divorces of the working day had expired: the day of twelve 7. They say unto him. Why did Moses then command to hours was reckoned from six to six. and saw others give a writing of divorcement, and to put her away! 8. standing idle-'unemployed'--in the market-place, 4. He saith unto them, Moses-as a civil lawgiver, because | And said unto them, Go ye also into the vineyard; and of-or 'having respect to the hardness of your hearts- whatsoever is right-just,' equitable,' in proportion looking to your low moral state, and your inability | to their time I will give you. And they went their to endure the strictness of the original law, suffered way. 5. Again he went out about the sixth and ninth you to put away your wives--tolerated a relaxation of hour-about noon, and about three o'clock afternoon the strictness of the marriage bond-not as approv. --and did likewise-hiring and sending into his vineing of it, but to prevent still greater evils. but from l yard fresh labourers each time. 6. And about the the beginning it was not so. This is repeated, in order | eleventh hour-but one hour before the close of the to impress upon His audience the temporary and working day: a most unusual hour both for offering purely civil character of this Mosaic relaxation. 9. I and engaging--and found others standing idle, and saith, And I say unto you, Whosoever shall put away his wife, | Why stand ye here all the day idle? Of course they had except, &c. See on ch. 6. 32. 10. His disciples say unto not been there, or not been disposed to offer themhim, If the case of the man be so with his wife, it is not selves at the proper time, but as they were now willgood to marry:-9.d., In this view of marriage, surely I ing. and the day was not over, and "yet there was it must prove a snare rather than a blessing, and had room," they also are engaged, and on similar terms better be avoided altogether.' 11. But he said unto with all the rest. 8. So when even was come-i.€., the them, All men cannot receive this saying, save they to reckoning time between masters and labourers (see whom it is given:7.d., That the unmarried state is Deuteronomy, 24. 15); pointing to the day of final better, is a saying not for every one, and indeed only account-the lord of the vineyard saith unto his steward for such as it is divinely intended for.' But who are l-answering to Christ Himself, represented "as & Son

Of the Labourers in the Vineyard.

MATTHEW, XXI.

The Authority of Jesus Questioned. over His own house" (Hebrews, 3. 6; see ch. 11. 27:1 20-22. STIR ABOUT HIM IN THE CITY-SECOND Joha, 3. 36; & 27). Call the labourers, and give them CLEANSING OF THE TEMPLE, AND MIRACLES THERE their hire, beginning from the last unto the first. Re. - GLORIOUS VINDICATION OF THE CHILDREN'S markable direction this-last hired, first paid.' 9. TESTIMONY-THE BARREN FIG TREE CURSED, WITH And when they came that were hired about the eleventh LESSONS FROM IT. (=Mark. 11. 11-26; Luke, 19. 45-48.) bour, they received every man a penny-& full day's For the exposition, see Luke, 19. after v. 44; and on tages. 10. But when the first came, they supposed that | Mark, 11. 12-26. they should have received more. This is that calculat- 23-46. THE AUTHORITY OF JESUS QUESTIONED, ing, mercenary spirit which had peeped out-though AND THE REPLY-THE PARABLES OF THE Two Sons, perhaps very slightly-ia Peter's question (ch. 19. 27), AND OF THE WICKED HUSBANDMEN. (=Mark, 11. aad which this parable was designed once for all 27-12. 12: Luke, 20. 1-19.) Now commences, as ALto put down among the servants of Christ. 11. And FORD remarks, that series of parables and discourses obes they had received it. they murmured against the of our Lord with His enemies, in which He develops. Goodman of the house-rather, 'the householder,' the more completely than ever before. His hostility to word being the same as in v. 1. 12. Saying, These last their hypocrisy and iniquity: and so they are stirred have wrought (bnt] one hour, and thou hast made them up to compass His death.

eu unto es, which have borne the burden and heat The Authority of Jesus Questioned, and the Reply "the burning heat of the day-who have wrought not (.23-27). 23. By what authority doest thou these things! only longer but during a more trying period of the --referring particularly to the expulsion of the buyers dar 13 But he answered one of them-doubtless the and sellers from the temple. and who gave thee this pokesman of the corn plaining party-and said, Friend, authority ? 24. And Jesus answered and said unto them. 1 thee no wrong: didst not thou agree with me for a I also will ask you one thing ... 25. The baptism of John pearl... 15. Is it not lawful for me to do what I will -meaning, his whole mission and ministry, of which mith mina own? Is thine eye evil, becanse I am good ? baptism was the proper character, whence was it?

You appeal to justice, and by that your from heaven, or of inen! What wisdom there was in booth is shut: for the sum you agreed for is paid this way of meeting their question, will best appear you: Your case being disposed of, with the terins I by their reply. If we shall say. From heaven; he will make with other labourers you have nothing to do; say unto us, Why did ye not then believe him!- Why and to rudge the benevolence shown to others, did ye not believe the testimony which he bore to worn by your own admission you have been honour Me, as the promised and expected Messiah? for that ably dealt with, is both unworthy envy of your neigh was the burden of his whole testimony. 26. But if hour, and discontent with the goodness that engaged we shall say, O! men: we fear the people--rather the and rewarded you in his service at all.' 16. So the multitude. In Lnke 20. 6) it is, "all the people will Last skall be first, and the first last-9.d.. Take heed stone us"- stone us to death.' for all hold John as

* by indulging the spirit of these "murmurers" at a prophet. Crooked, cringing hypocrites! No wonder the penny" given to the last hired, ye miss your Jesus gave you no answer. 27. And they answered o penny, though first in the vineyard; while the Jesus. and said, We cannot tell. Evidently their diffiwas louders of having come in so late may inspire culty was, how to answer, so as neither to shake their these last with such a humble frame, and such ad determination to reject the claims of Christ nor miration of the race that has hired and rewarded damage their reputation with the people. For the them at all, as will put them into the foremost place truth itself they cared nothing whatever. Neither in the end.' for many be called, but few chosen. This tell I yon by what authority I do these things. What 3 another of our Lord's terse and pregnant sayings, composure and dignity of wisdom does our Lord more than once uttered in different connections. here display, as He turns their question upon themech 19.30; 12. 14.) The "calling" of which the selves, and, while revealing His knowledge of their dew Testament almost invariably speaks is what hypocrisy, closes their mouths! Taking advantage urines call afectral calling, carrying with it a super-of the surprise, silence, and awe, produced by this mural operation on the will to secure its consent. reply, our Lord followed it immediately up by the Bali that cannot be the meaning of it here: the two following parables.

lei" being emphatically distinguished from the Parable of the Two Sons (r. 28-32). 28. But what think Shesen." It can only mean here the invited.' ye? A certain man had two sons; and he came to the first and so the sense is, Many receive the invitations of and said, Son, go work to-day in my vineyard-for true the Gospel whom God has never "chosen to sal- religion is a practical thing, a "bringing forth fruit Fation tbrough sanctification of the Spirit and belief unto God." 29. He answered and said, I will not. of the truth" (2 Thessalonians, 2. 13). But what, it TRENCH notices the rudeness of this answer, and the ay be asked, has this to do with the subject of our total absence of any attempt to excuse such disobeditable? Probably this-to teach us that men who ence, both characteristic; representing careless, reckakve wrought in Christ's service all their days may, less sinners, resisting God to His face. 30. And he by the sprit which they manifest at the last, make it came to the second, and said likewise. And he answered Befident that, as between God and their own and said, I (gol. sir-I, sir.' The emphatic "I." Suk they never were chosen workmen at all.

here, denotes the self-righteous complacency which v2 THIRD EXPLICIT ANNOUNCEMENT OF HIS says, “God, I thank thee that I am not as other ATBOACHING SUFFERINGS, DEATH, AND RESUR men" (Luke, 18. 11). and went not. He did not "after

2108-TIE AMBITIOUS REQUEST OF JAMES AND ward repent” and refuse to go; for there was here no JOBY, AND THE REPLY. =Mark, 10. 32-45; Luke, intention to go. It is the class that "say and do 11-9. For the exposition, see on Mark, 10. 32-45. not" (ch. 23. 3)-a falseness more abominable to God,

23-34. Two BLIND MEN HEALED. =Mark, 10. says STIER, than any "I will not." 31. Whether of B ; Lake, 18. 36-43.) For the exposition, see on them twain did the will of his Father? They say unto

him, The first. Now comes the application. Jesus CHAPTER XXI.

saith unto them, Verily I say unto you, That the publicans Ver. 1-. CHRIST'S TRIUMPHAL ENTRY INTO JERU and the harlots go-or are going; even now entering, JE OS TIL FIRST DAY OF THE WEEK, =Mark, while ye hold back into the kingdom of God before EL I-II; Luke, 19. 29-40: John. 12. 12-19.) For the ex- you. The publicans and the harlots were the first cation of this majestic scene-recorded, as will be son, who, when told to work in the Lord's vineyard. cm, by all the Evangelists-see on Luke, 19. 29-40. I said, I will not; but afterwards repented and went.

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Parable of the

MATTHEW, XXI.

Wicked Eusbandmen. Their early life was a flat and flagrant refusal to do truth, that God's inberitance was destined for, and what they were commanded; it was one continued in due time is to come into the possession of, His rebellion against the authority of God. “The chief own Son in our nature (Hebrews, 1. 2). come, let us priests and the elders of the people," with whom our kill him, and let us seize on his inheritance--that so, Lord was now speaking, were the second son, who from mere seroants, we may become lords. This is said. I go, Sir, but went not. They were early called, the deep aim of the depraved heart; this is emphaand all their life long professed obedience to God, tically "the root of all evil." 39. And they caugnt but never rendered it; their life was one of continued bim, and cast him out of the vineyard-ef. Hebrews, 13. disobedience, 32. For John came unto you in the way | 11-13 ("without the gate - without the camp "): of righteousness-1.e., calling you to repentance;' as 1 Kings, 21. 13; John, 19. 17, and slew him. 40. When Noah is styled a preacher of righteousness" (2 Peter, the lo.d therefore of the viueyard cometh. This repre2. 5), when like the Baptist he warned the old world sents the settling time,' which, in the case of the to "flee from the wrath to come.” and ye believed Jewish ecclesiastics, was that judicial trial of the him not-"They did not reject him:" nay. they " were | nation and its leaders which issued in the destruction willing for a season to rejoice in his light" (John, 6. of their whole state. what will he do unto those hus36): but they would not receive his testimony to bandmen 41. They say unto him, He will miserably Jesus. but the publicans and the harlots believed him. destroy those wicked men- an emphatic alliteration not of the publicans this is twice expressly recorded, easily conveyed in English: He will badly destroy Luke, 3. 12; 7. 29. Of the harlots, then, the same may | those bad men,' or 'miserably destroy those miserbe taken for granted, though the fact is not expressly able men,' is something like it. and will let out his recorded. These outcasts gladly believed the testi vineyard unto other husbandren, which shall render him mony of John to the coming Saviour, and so hastened the fruits in their seasons. If this answer was given by to Jesus when He came. See Luke, 7. 37; 16, 1, &c. the Pharisees, to whom our Lord addressed the and ye, when ye had seen it, repented not afterward, that parable, they thus unwittingly pronounced their own ye might believe him. Instead of being "provoked condemnation; as did David to Nathan the prophet to jealousy!! by their example, ye have seen them (2 Samuel, 12. 6-7), and Simon the Pharisee to our Lord flocking to the Saviour and getting to heaven, un- (Luke, 7. 43, &c.). But if it was given, as the two moved

other Evangelists agree in representing it, by our Parable of the Wicket Husbandmen (v. 33-46). 33. Lord Himself, and the explicitness of the answer Hear another parable: There was a certain householder, would seem to favour that supposition, then we can which planted a vineyard. See on Luke, 13. 6. and better explain the exclamation of the Pharisees hedged it round about, and digged a winepress in it, and which followed it, in Luke's report-"And when built a tower. These details are taken, as is the basis they heard it, they said, God forbid"--His whole of the parable itself, from that beautiful parable of meaning now bursting upon them. 42. Jesus saith Isaiah, 6. 1-7, in order to fix down the application unto them, Did ye never read in the Scriptores (Psalm and sustain it by Old Testament authority. and let 118. 22, 23). The stone which the builders rejected, &c. it out to husbandmen. These are just the ordinary A bright Messianic prophecy, which reappears in spiritual guides of the people, under whose care and various forms (Isaiah, 28. 16, &c.), and was made culture the fruits of righteousness are expected to glorious use of by Peter before the Sanhedrim (Acta, spring up. and went into a far country-"for a long 4. 11). He recurs to it in his first epistle (1 Peter. time" (Luke, 20. 9), leaving the vineyard to the laws 2. 4-6). 43. Therefore say I unto you, The kingdom of of the spiritual husbandry during the whole time of God-God's visible Kingdom, or Church, upon earth. the Jewish economy. On this phraseology, see on which up to this time stood in the seed of Abraham, Mark, 4. 26. 34. And when the time of the fruit drew shall be taken from you, and given to a nation bringing near, he sent his servants to the husbandmen. By these forth the fruits thereof-i.e., the great Evangelical com** servants" are meant the prophets and other extra | munity of the faithful, which, after the extrusion of ordinary messengers, raised up from time to time. the Jewish nation, would consist chiefly of Gentiles. See on ch. 23. 37. that they might receive the fruits until "all Israel should be saved” (Romans, IL. 25, 26. of it. See again on Luke, 13. 6. 35. And the husband. This vastly important statement is given by Matthew men took his servants, and beat one-see Jeremiah, 37, only. 44. And whosoever shall fall on this stone shall 16; 38. 6. and killed another-see Jeremiah, 20. 20-23, be broken: but on whomsoever it shall fall, it will grind and stoned another-see 2 Chronicles, 24. 21. Compare him to powder. The Kingdom of God is here a with this whole verse ch. 23. 37, where our Lord Temple, in the erection of which a certain stone, rereiterates these charges in the most melting strain,jected as unsuitable by the spiritual builders, is, by 36. Again, he sent other servants more than the first; and the great Lord of the House, made the key-stone of they did unto them likewise-see 2 Kings 17. 13; 2 Chro- the whole. On that Stone the builders were now nicles, 36. 16, 16: Nehemiah, 9. 26. 37. But last of all "falling" and being “broken” (Isaiah, 8. 15). They he sent unto them his son, saying, They will reverence were sustaining great spiritual hurt; but soon that my son. In Mark (12. 6) this is most touchingly ex- Stone should "fall upon them." and "grind them to pressed: “Having yet therefore one son, His well-powder" (Daniel, 2, 34, 35; Zechariah, 12. 3)—in their beloved, He sent Him also last unto them, saying, corporate capacity, in the tremendous destruction of They will reverence my son." Luke's version of it Jerusalem, but personally, as unbelievers, in a more too (20. 13) is striking: "Then said the lord of the awful sense still. 45. And when the chief priests and vineyard, What shall I do? I will send my beloved Pharisees had heard his parables-referring to that of son : it may be they will reverence Him when they the Two Sons and this one of the Wicked Husband. see Him." Who does not see that our Lord here men, they perceived that he spake of them. 46. But severs Himself, by the sharpest line of demarcation, when they sought to lay hands on him-which Luke from all merely human messengers, and claims for (20. 19) says they did the same hour," hardly abie Himself Sonship in its loftiest sense? (Cf, Hebrews, to restrain their rage, they feared the multitude 2.3-6.) The expression, "It may be they will reverence rather the multitudes'-because they took him for a my son," is designed to teach the almost unimagin prophet-just as they feared to say John's baptism able guilt of not reverentially welcoming God's Son. was of men, because the masses took him for a 38. But when the husbandmen saw the son, they said prophet (v. 26). Miserable creatures! So, for this among themselves-cf. Genesis, 37. 18-20; John, 11. 47-53, time, "they left Him and went their way" (Mark. This is the bour. Sublime expression this of the great 12. 12).

Parade of the

MATTHEW, XXII.

Marriage of the King's Son, CHAPTER XXII.

destroyed those murderers-and in what vast numberg Ver. 1-14. PARABLE OF THE MARRIAGE OF THE | did they do it! and burned up their city. Ah! JeruKrso's Son. This is a different parable from that of salem, once the city of the Great King” (Psalm the Great Supper.'in Luke, 14, 15, &c., and is recorded 48. 2), and even up almost to this time (ch. 5. 35); but by Matthew alone. 2. The kingdom of heaven is like now it is "their city"- just as our Lord, a day or two auto a certain king, which made a marriage for his son. | after this, said of the temple, where God had so long * In this parable, as TRENCH admirably remarks, I dwelt, “Behold your house is left unto you deso"we see how the Lord is revealing Himself in ever late" (ch. 23. 38)! Cf. Luke, 19. 43, 44. 8. The wedding clearer light as the central Person of the kingdom, is ready, but they which were bidden were not worthydring here a far plainer hint than in the last parable for how should those be deemed worthy to sit down of the nobility of His descent. There He was indeed at His table who had affronted Him by their treatibe Son, the only and beloved one (Mark, 12. 6), of ment of His gracions invitation ? 9. Go ye thereforo the Householder: but here His race is royal, and He into the highways-the great outlets and thoroughappears as Himself at once the King and the King's | fares, whether of town or country, where human Son (Psalm 72. 1.) The last was a parable of tbe | beings are to be found, and as many as ye shall find bid Old Testament history: and Christ is rather the last to the marriage-i.e., just as they are. 10. So those ser

od Teatest of the line of its prophets and teachers vants went out into the highways, and gathered together than the Founder of a new kingdom. In that, God | all as many as they found, both bad and good-i.e., withappears demanding something from men; in this, a | out making any distinction between open sinners parable of grace, God appears more as giving some- and the morally correct. The Gospel call fetched thing to them. Thus, as often, the two complete each in Jews, Samaritans, and outlying heathen alike. other: this taking up the matter where the other Thus far the parable answers to that of the Great left it. The "marriage" of Jehovah to His people / Supper,' Luke, 14. 16. &c. But the distinguishing Israel was familiar to Jewish ears; and in Psalm 46. | feature of our parable is what follows: 11. And when this marriage is seen consummated in the Person of | the king came in to see the guests. Solemn expression Messiah *THE KING,' Himself addressed as 'God' this, of that omniscient inspection of every professed sad yet as anointed by His GOD' with the oil of disciple of the Lord Jesus from age to age, in virtue of radness above His fellows. These apparent contra | which his true character will hereafter be judicially dictories (see on Luke, 20. 41-44) are resolved in this proclaimed! he saw there a man. This shows that it panable, and Jesus, in claiming to be this King's Son, cortes HirsU Heir to all that the prophets and sweet this latter part of the parable: the first part repre

gry of Israel held forth as to Jehovah's ineffably sents rather national judgment. which had not on a ser and endearing union to His people. But observe wedding garment. The language here is drawn from carefully. that THE BRIDE does not come into view the following remarkable passage in Zephaniah, 1. in this parable: its design being to teach certain 7.8:-"Hold thy peace at the presence of the Lord traths under the figure of guests at a wedding feast, God; for the day of the Lord is at hand; for the Lord

nt, which would hath prepared & sacrifice. He hath bid His guests, Dot have harmonised with the introduction of the | And it shall come to pass in the day of the Lord's Eride 3. And sent forth his servants-representing all sacrifice, that I will punish the princes, and the preachers of the Gospel, to call them that were bidden king's children, and all such as are clothed with

bere meaning the Jews, who were "bidden," from strange, apparel.” The custom in the East of prethe Erst choice of them onwards through every sum-senting festival garments (see Genesis, 45. 22; 2 Kings, mons addressed to them by the prophets to hold 6. 22), even though not clearly proved, is certainly themselves in readiness for the appearing of their presupposed here. It undoubtedly means something Kisz to the wedding-or the marriage festivities, which they bring not of their own--for how could

ben tbe preparations were all concluded. and they they have any such dress who were gathered in from cald vot come as the issue of the whole ministry of the highways indiscriminately 1-but which they rethe Baptist. our Lord Himself, and His apostlesceive as their appropriate dress. And what can that thereafter, too sadly showed. 4. my oxen and my fat- be but what is meant by" putting on the Lord Jesus," lags are lilled, and all things are ready: come into the as “THE LORD OUR RIGHTEOUSNESS ?" (See Psalm

Tiage. This points to those Gospel calls after 46. 13, 14.) Nor could such language be strange to Christ's death, resurrection, ascension, and effusion those in whose ears had so long resounded those of the Spirit, to which the parable could not directly | words of prophetic joy: "I will greatly rejoice in altede, but when only it could be said, with strict the Lord, my soul shall be joyful in my God; for Ho propriety. " that all things were ready." Cf. 1 Co-hath clothed me with the garments of salvation, He #sthians, 6. 7. 8. "Christ our passover is sacrificed hath covered me with the robe of righteousness, as a tur : therefore, let us keep the feast:" also John, I bridegroom decketh himself with ornaments, and as & $. "I am the living bread which came down from a bride adorneth herself with her jewels” (Isaiah, Leaven: if any man eat of this bread, he shall live 61. 10). 12. Friend, how camest thou in hither not having for ever: and the bread which I will give is my flesh, I a wedding garment? And he was speechless-being selfwhich I will give for the life of the world." 5. But condemned. 13. Then said the king to the servants-tho Seznde Hght of it, and went their ways, one to his farm. I angelic ministers of divine vengeance (as in ch. 13. 41). saether to his merchandise : 6. And the remnant took his Bind him hand and foot-putting it out of his power to Hrvata, and entreated them spitefully-'insulted them,' resist, and take him away, and cast him into outer dark and slew them. These are two different classes of ness. So ch. 8. 12; 25. 30. The expression is emphatic unbelievers : the one simply indifferent: the other - The darkness which is outside.' To be outside at absolutely hostrie-the one, contemptuous scorners: 1 all-or, in the language of Revelation, 29. 16, to be the other, bitter persecutors. 7. But when the king without the heavenly city, excluded from its joyous the Great God, who is the Father of our Lord Jesus nuptials and gladsome festivities-is sad enough of Christ, beard thereof, be was wroth-at the affront pat | itself, without anything else. But to find themselves both on His Son, and on Himself who had deigned to not only excluded from the brightness and glory and Evide them. and be sent forth his armies. The Ro- joy and felicity of the kingdom above, but thrust m are here styled God's armies, just as the Assy. | into & region of "darkness," with all its horrors, riu is styled "the rod of His anger" (Isaiah, 10. 5), as this is the dismal retribution here announced, that Leize the executors of His judicial vengeance. and awaits the unworthy at the great day. (there-in

Parable of the

MATTHEW, XXI.

Wicked Husbandmar, Their early life was a flat and flagrant refusal to do I truth, that God's inheritance was destined for, and what they were commanded: it was one continued in due time is to come into the possession of, His rebellion against the authority of God. "The chief | own Son in our nature (Hebrews, 1. 2). come, let us priests and the elders of the people," with whom our | kill him, and let us seize on his inheritance-that so, Lord was now speaking, were the second son, who from mere servants, we may become lords. This is said, I go, Sir, but went not. They were early called, I the deep aim of the depraved heart; this is emphaand all their life long professed obedience to God, tically "the root of all evil.” 39. And they caugnt but never rendered it; their life was one of continued him, and cast him out of the vineyard-ef. Hebrews, 13. disobedience. 32. For John came unto you in the way | 11-13 ("without the gate - without the camp"): of righteousness--i.., calling you to repentance;' as | 1 Kings, 21. 13; John, 19. 17, and slew him. 40. Wheu Noah is styled a preacher of righteousness" (2 Peter, the lo.d therefore of the vineyard cometh. This repre2. 5), when like the Baptist he warned the old world sents the settling time,' which, in the case of the to "flee from the wrath to come,” and ye believed Jewish ecclesiastics, was that judicial trial of the him not--" They did not reject him;" nay, they “were nation and its leaders which issued in the destruction willing for a season to rejoice in his light” (John, 6. l of their whole state. what will he do unto those hug. 36): but they would not receive his testimony to bandmen! 41. They say unto him, He will miserably Jesus. but the publicans and the harlots believed him. destroy those wicked men-an emphatic alliteration not Of the publicans this is twice expressly recorded, easily conveyed in English: He will badly destroy Luke, 3. 12; 7. 29. Of the harlots, then, the same may those bad men.' or 'miserably destroy those miserbe taken for granted, though the fact is not expressly able men,' is something like it. and will let out his recorded. These outcasts gladly believed the testi. | vineyard unto other husbandiren, which shall render him mony of John to the coming Saviour, and so hastened the fruits in their seasons. If this answer was given by to Jesus when He came. See Luke, 7. 37; 16, 1, &c. the Pharisees, to whom our Lord addressed the and ye, when ye had seen it, repented not afterward, that parable, they thus unwittingly pronounced their own ye might believe him. Instead of being "provoked condemnation; as did David to Nathan the prophet to jealousy" by their example, ye have seen them (2 Samuel, 12. 6-7), and Simon the Pharisee to our Lord flocking to the Saviour and getting to heaven, un- (Luke, 7. 43, &c.). But if it was given, as the two moved,

other Evangelists agree in representing it, by our Parable of the Wicked Husbandmen (v. 33-46). 33. Lord Himself, and the explicitness of the answer Hear another parable: There was a certain householder, would seem to favour that supposition, then we can which planted a vineyard. See on Luke, 13. 6. and better explain the exclamation of the Pharisees hedged it round about, and digged a winepress in it, and which followed it. in Luke's report-"And when built a tower. These details are taken, as is the basis they heard it, they said, God forbid”-His whole of the parable itself, from that beautiful parable of meaning now bursting upon them. 42. Jesus saith Isaiah, 6. 1-7. in order to fix down the application | unto them, Did ye never read in the Scriptures (Psalm and sustain it by Old Testament authority, and let 118. 22, 23). The stone which the builders rejected, &c. it out to husbandmen. These are just the ordinary | A bright Messianic prophecy, which reappears in spiritual guides of the people, under whose care and various forms (Isaiah, 28. 16, &c.), and was made culture the fruits of righteousness are expected to glorious use of by Peter before the Sanhedrim (Acts. spring up. and went into a far country-"for a long | 4. 11). He recurs to it in his first epistle (1 Peter, time" (Luke, 20. 9), leaving the vineyard to the laws | 2. 4-6). 43. Therefore say I unto you, The kingdom of of the spiritual husbandry during the whole time of God-God's visible Kingdom, or Church, upon earth, the Jewish economy. On this phraseology, see on which up to this time stood in the seed of Abraham, Mark. 4. 26. 34. And when the time of the fruit drew shall be taken from you, and given to a nation bringing near, he sent his servants to the husbandmen. By these forth the fruits thereof-i.e., the great Evangelical com** servants" are meant the prophets and other extra munity of the faithful, which, after the extrusion of ordinary messengers, raised up from time to time. the Jewish nation, would consist chiefly of Gentiles, See on ch. 23. 37. that they might receive the fruits | until "all Israel should be saved" (Romans, 11. 25, 201. of it. See again on Luke, 13. 6. 35. And the husband- | This vastly important statement is given by Matthew men took his servants, and beat one-see Jeremiah, 37. only. 44. And whosoever shall fall on this stone shall 16:38. 6. and killed another-see Jeremiah, 26. 20-23. be broken: but ou whomsoever it shall fall, it will grind and stoned another-see 2 Chronicles, 24. 21. Compare him to powder, The Kingdom of God is here a with this whole verse ch. 23. 37. where our Lord | Temple, in the erection of which a certain stone, rereiterates these charges in the most melting strain. jected as unsuitable by the spiritual builders, is, by 36. Again, be sent other servants more than the first; and the great Lord of the House, made the key-stone of they did unto them likewise-Bee 2 Kings 17. 13; 2 Chro- the whole. On that Stone the builders were now nicles, 36. 16, 16: Nehemiah, 9. 26. 37. But last of all "falling" and being “broken" (Isaiah, 8. 15). They he sent unto them his son, saying, They will reverence were sustaining great spiritual hurt; but soon that my son. In Mark (12. 6) this is most touchingly ex. | Stone should "fall upon them" and "grind them to pressed: “Having yet therefore one son, His well-powder" (Daniel, 2, 34, 35; Zechariah, 12 3)-in their beloved, He sent Him also last unto them, saying, corporate capacity, in the tremendous destruction of They will reverence my son." Luke's version of it Jerusalem, but personally, as unbelievers, in a more too (20. 13) is striking: "Then said the lord of the awful sense still. 45. And when the chief priests and vineyard. What shall I do? I will send my beloved Pharisees had heard his parables--referring to that of son; it may be they will reverence Him when they the Two Sons and this one of the Wicked Husbandsee Him." Who does not see that our Lord here men, they perceived that he spake of them. 46. But severs Himself, by the sharpest line of demarcation, when they sought to lay hands on him-which Luka from all merely human messengers, and claims for (20. 19) says they did "the same hour," hardly able Himsell Sonship in its loftiest sense ? (Cr, Hebrews, to restrain their rage, they feared the multitude 2.3-6.) The expression, “It may be they will reverence rather the multitudes'-because they took him for a my son," is designed to teach the almost unimagin. prophet-just as they feared to say John's baptism able guilt of not reverentially welcoming God's Son. was of men, because the masses took him for a 38. But when the hasbandmen saw the son, they said prophet (v. 26). Miserable creatures! So, for this among themselves-cf. Genesis, 37. 18-20: John, 11. 47-63, time, "they left Him and went their way" (Mark. This is the hour. Sublime expression this of the great 12. 12).

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