Зображення сторінки
PDF

Dan of the Spirit

MATTHEW, IV.

upon the Baptized Redeemer. ar to full it all! Let the thoughtful reader Son of God-now and henceforward in His official und this Then he suffered him-with true humility, capacity-that was here visibly manifested. 17. And eins to higher authority than his own impressions lo a voice from heaven, saying, This is–Mark and Luke pe priety.

give it in the direct form, "Thou art"-my beloved *ent of the Spirit upon the Baptized Redeemer son, in whom I am well pleased. The verb is put in

16. And Jesus, when he was baptized, went up the aorist to express absolute complacency, once and magd! Tay out of-rather, 'from'-the water. Mark for ever felt towards Him. The English here, at least

out of the water." and-adds Luke (3. 21), to modern ears, is scarcely strong enough. 'I delight' riuile He wus praying;" a grand piece of informa- comes the nearest, perhaps, to that ineffable com

Can there be a doubt about the burden of that placency which is manifestly intended; and this is the raper: a prayer sent up, probably, while yet in the rather to be preferred, as it would immediately carry muter-Alis blessed head suffused with the baptismal the thoughts back to that sugust Messianic prophecy cabeat: a prayer continued likely as He stepped out to which the voice from heaven plainly alluded 4 the stream, and again stood upon the dry ground? (Isaiah, 42. 1), “Behold my Servant, whom I uphold: me tork before Him, the needed and expected Spirit mine Elect, IN WHOM MY SOUL DELIGHTETH." Nor

test upon Him for it, and the glory He would then are the words which follow to be overlooked." I have rapoa the Father that sent Him-would not these put my Spirit upon Him: He shall bring forth judg1 I breast, and find silent vent in such form as ment to the Gentiles.” (The LXX. pervert this, as 2-LoI come; I delight to do thy will, o God. they do most of the Messianic predictions, interpoFune, glorify thy name. Show me a token for good. lating the word “Jacob," and applying it to the Jews.) Let the spirit of the Lord God come upon me, and I was this voice heard by the by-standers? From v preach the Gospel to the poor, and heal the Matthew's form of it, one might suppose it so de

-bearted, and send forth judgment unto vic- signed: but it would appear that it was not, and prokry.' Whilst He was yet speaking-lo, the heavens bably John only heard and saw anything peculiar En and Mark says, sublimely. “He saw the about that great baptism. Accordingly, the words Buena deaving" and he saw the Spirit of God de "Hear ye Him" are not added, as at the TrapstiguIns-that is. He only, with the exception of His ration. pocial servadt, as he tells us himself, John. 1.

CHAPTER IV. **the bystanders apparently seeing nothing. like Ver 1-11. TEMPTATION OF CHRIST. (=Mark, 1. store, and ligbting upon him. Luke says, “in a bodily 12, 13; Luke, 4. 1-13.) 1. Then-an indefinite note of espe22; that is, the blessed Spirit, assuming the sequence. But Mark's word (1. 12) fixes what we

real form of a dove, descended thus upon His should have presumed was meant, that it was "immeacred bead. But why in this form! The Scripture diately" after His baptism; and with this agrees the * this emblem will be our best guide here. statement of Luke (4.1). was Jesus led up i.e., from Ni dore, my and filed is one," says the song (6.9. the low Jordan valley to some more elevated spot. he is ebasta purity. Again. Be ye harmless as of the Spirit-that blessed Spirit immediately before cita says Christ Himself (Matthew, 10. 16). This spoken of as descending upon Him at His baptism. * the same thing, in the form of inoffensiveness and abiding upon Him. Luke, connecting these two tuds men "A conscience void of offence toward scenes, as if the one were but the sequel of the other, 1 sad toward men" (Acts, 24. 16 expresses both. says, “Jesus, being full of the Holy Ghost, returned Hartber. when we read in the Song 2. 14), “O my from Jordan, and was led,” &c. Mark's expression dure, that art in the clefts of the rock, in the secret has a startling sharpness about it-" Immediately reas of the sairs see Isaiah, 6. 87. let me see thy the Spirit driveth Him." .putteth' or 'hurrieth. Elenance, let me hear thy voice; for sweet is thy Him forth,' or 'impelleth Him.' (See the same word Ince, and thy countenance is comely"- it is shrink- in Mark, 1. 43; 5. 40; Matthew, 9. 25; 13. 62: John, 10. 4.) andesty.meekness, gentleness, that is thus charm. The thought thus strongly expressed is the mighty

depictedIn a word – not to allude to the constraining impulse of the Spirit under which He hinal emblem of the dove that flew back to the went; while Matthew's more gentle expression, "was ai. bearing in its mouth the olive leaf of peace led up," intimates how purely voluntary on His own Beatos, & 11-when we read (Psalm 68. 13). "Ye part this action was into the wilderness-probably the Lalbe us the wings of a dove covered with silver, wild Judean desert. The particular spot which traad her leathers with yellow gold," it is beauteousness dition has fixed upon has hence got the name of that is thus held forth And was not guch that Quarantana or Quarantaria, from the forty days,* Haby, barulass. undefiled One," the “Separate from 'an almost perpendicular wall of rock twelve or uzers" "Thon art fairer than the children of fifteen hundred feet above the plain.' (ROBINSON'S 28;nce is poored into Thy lips; therefore God Palestine.) The supposition of those who incline to La bussed Thee for ever!" But the fourth Gospel place the Temptation amongst the mountains of Ses as oge more piece of information here, on the Moab is, we think, very improbable. to be temptedherity of one who saw and testified of it: “John The Greek word (peirazein) means simply to try or ha reord, saying, I saw the Spirit descending from make proof of; and when ascribed to God in His keara lite a dove, and IT ABODE UPON HIM.” And dealings with men, it means, and can mean no more

hould think that this was an accidental thing. than this. Thus, Genesis, 22. 1, “ It came to pass that he adds that this last particular was expressly given God did tempt Abraham," or put his faith to a severe

part of the sin by which he was to recognise proof. (See Deuteronomy, 8. 2.) But for the most stratify Him as the son of God: “And I knew part in Scripture the word is used in a bad sense, and Esa zat: bat He that sent me to baptize with water, means to entice, solicit, or provoke to sin. Hence the

come maid unto me. Upon whom thou shalt sce name here given to the wicked one-"the tempter" i rant descending AND REMAINING ON Him, the (v. 3). Accordingly, "to be tempted" here is to be

la He which baptizeth with the Holy Ghost. understood both ways. The Spirit conducted Him I sw, and bare record that this is the Son of into the wilderness simply to have His faith tried; " Jobs, 1 32-34. And when

with this we compare but as the agent in this trial was to be the wicked predicted descent of the Spirit upon Messiah one, whose whole object would be to seduce Him web. IL 4, “And the Spirit of the Lord shall rest from His allegiance

to God, it was a templation in the **** buss, " we cannot doubt that it was this perma- bad sense of the term. The unworthy inference Reas and perfect resting of the Holy Ghost upon the which some would draw from this is energetically

The Baptism of Water

MATTHEW, III.

and of the Holy Ghost, remove impressions derogatory to his blessed Master, , up John in prison." This imprisonment of John, which he knew to be taking hold of the popular however, did not take place for some time after mind-" saying unto them all”-in solemn protesta- this; and it is here recorded merely because the tion: (We now return to the First Gospel.) 11. I Evangelist did not intend to recur to his history till indeed baptize you with water unto repentance (see on he had occasion to relate the message which he sent 0. 6): but he that cometh after me is mightier than I. to Christ from his prison at Machærus (Luke, 7. In Mark and Luke this is more emphatic-"But 18, &c.). there cometh the Mightier than I," whose shoes, or 13-17. BAPTISM OF CHRIST, AND DESCENT OF THE *sandals,' I am not worthy to bear. The sandals were SPIRIT UPON HIM IMMEDIATELY THEREAFTER. tied and untied, and borne about by the meanest Mark, 1. 9-11: Luke, 3. 21, 22; John, 1. 31-34.) Bapservants. he shall baptize you - the emphatic "He;" tism of Christ (r. 13-15). 13. Then cometh Jesus from

He it is,' to the exclusion of all others that shall Galilee to Jordan uunto John, to be baptized of him. baptize you.' with the Holy Ghost. "So far from Moses rashly anticipated the Divine call to deliver entertaining such a thought as laying claim to the his people, and for this was fain to flee the house honours of Messiahship, the meanest services I can of bondage, and wait in obscurity for forty years more render to that "Mightier than I that is coming after (Exodus, 2. 11, &c.). Not so this Greater than Moses. me” are too high an honour for me: I am but the All but thirty years had He now spent in privacy at servant, but the Master is coming; I administer but Nazareth, gradually ripening for His public work, the outward symbol of purification ; His it is, as His and calmly awaiting the time appointed of the Father. sole prerogative, to dispense the inward reality.' Now it had arrived; and this movement from Galilee Beautiful spirit, distinguishing this servant of Christ to Jordan is the step, doubtless, of deepest interthroughout! and with fire. To take this as a distinct est to all heaven since that first one which brought baptism from that of the Spirit-& baptism of the Him into the world. Luke (3. 21) has this important impenitent with hell-fire-is exceedingly unnatural. addition-"Now when all the people were baptized, it Yet this was the view of ORIGEN among the Fathers; came to pass, that Jesus being baptized," &c.-imand among moderns, of NEANDER, MEYER, DE plying that Jesus waited till all other applicants for WETTE, and LANGE. Nor is it much better to refer baptism that day had been disposed of, ere be it to the fire of the great day, by which the earth and stepped forward, that He might not seem to be merely the works that are therein shall be burned up. Clearly, one of the crowd. Thus, as He rode into Jerusalem as we think, it is but the fiery character of the upon an ass "whereon yet never man sat" (Luke, Spirit's operations upon the soul-searching, consum 19. 30), and lay in a sepulchre "wherein was never ing, refining, sublimating--as nearly all good inter-man yet laid" (John, 19. 41), so in His baptism too He preters understand the words. And thus, in two suc- would be "separate from sinners." 14. But John for cessive clauses, the two most familiar emblems-water bade him-rather, 'was (in the act of] hindering him,' and fire-are employed to set forth the same purify- or 'attempting to hinder him'-saying, I have need to ing operations of the Holy Ghost upon the soul. 12. be baptized of thee, and comest thou to me! (How John Whose (winnowing) fan is in his hand-ready for use. came to recognise Him, when he says he knew Him This is no other than the preaching of the gospel, not, see on John, 1. 31-34.) The emphasis of this most even now beginning, the effect of which would be to remarkable speech lies all in the pronouns: 'What! separate the solid from the spiritually worthless, as Shall the Master come for baptism to the servant wheat, by the winnowing fan, from the chaff. (Cf. 1 the sinless Saviour to a sinner That thus much is the similar representation in Malachi, 3. 1-3.) and in the Baptist's words will be clearly seen if it be he will throughly purge his (threshing) floor-that is, observed that he evidently regarded Jesus as Himself the visible church and gather his wheat-His true-needing no purification, but rather qualified to impart hearted saints : so called for their solid worth (cf. it to those who did. And do not all his other testiAmos. 9. 9; Luke, 22. 31). into the garner-"the king- monies to Christ fully bear out this sense of the words? dom of their Father," as this "garner" or "barn" is But it were a pity if, in the glory of this testimony beantifully explained by our Lord in the parable of l to Christ, we should miss the beautiful spirit in which the Wheat and the Tares (ch. 13. 30, 43). but he will it was borne-'Lord, must I baptize Theet Can I burn up the chaff-empty, worthless professors of re- bring myself to do such a thing!-reminding us of ligion, void of all solid religious principle and char. Peter's exclamation at the supper-table, "Lord, dost acter (see Psalm 1. 4). with unquenchable fire. Singu- Thou wash my feet while it has nothing of the lar is the strength of this apparent contradiction of false humility and presumption which dictated figures to be burnt up, but with a fire that is un. Peter's next speech, " Thou shalt never wash my quenchable; the one expressing the utter destruction feet" (John, 13. 6, 8). 15. And Jesus answering said of all that constitutes one's true life, the other the unto him, Suffer it to be so now-'Let it pass for the continued consciousness of existence in that awful con- present;' q.d., Thou recoilest, and no wonder, for dition. Luke adds the following important particu- | the seeming incongruity is startling; but in the preslars, 3. 18-20 : Ver. 18. “And many other things in lent case do as thou art bidden.' for thus it becometh his exhortation preached he unto the people," show-us-"us," not in the sense of me and thee,' or 'men ing that we have here but an abstract of his teach- / in general,' but as in John, 3. 11. to fulfil all righteousing. Besides what we read in John, 1. 29, 33, 34; 3. | mers. If this be rendered, with SCRIVENER, 'every 27-36; the incidental allusion to his having taught his ordinance,' or, with CAMPBELL, 'every institution,' disciples to pray (Luke, 11. 1)-of which not a word the meaning is obvious enough: and the same sense is is said elsewhere-shows how varied his teaching was. brought out by "all righteousness," or compliance Ver. 19. “But Herod the tetrarch, being reproved by with everything enjoined, baptism included. Inhim for Herodias his brother Philip's wife, and for deed, if this be the meaning, our version perhaps all the evils which Herod had done." In this last best brings out the force of the opening word "Thus." clause we have an important fact, here only men- But we incline to think that our Lord meant more tioned, sbowing how thorough-going was the fidelity of than this. The import of Circumcision and of Bapthe Baptist to his royal hearer, and how strong must tism seems to be radically the same. And if our rehave been the workings of conscience in that slave marks on the circumcision of our Lord (on Luke, 2. of passion when, notwithstanding such plainness, he | 21-24) are well founded, He would seem to have said. * did many things, and heard John gladly" (Mark. Thus do I impledge myself to the whole righteous. 6. 20). Ver. 20. "Added yet this above all, that he shutness of the Law-thus symbolically do enter on and

Dezut of the Spirit

MATTHEW, IV.

upon the Baptized Redeemet. s e to fulfl it all! Let the thoughtful reader Son of God-now and henceforward in His official wetch this. Then he suffered him-with true humility, I capacity-that was here visibly manifested. 17. And vieiding to higher authority than his own impressions lo a voice from heaven, saying. This is-Mark and Luke of propriety.

give it in the direct form, “Thou art"-my beloved Inscent of the Spirit upon the Baptized Redeemer Son, in whom I am well pleased. The verb is put in tr. 16, 17). 16. And Jesus, when he was baptized, went up the aorist to express absolute complacency, once and straightway out of-rather, 'from'--the water. Mark | for ever felt towards Him. The English here, at least tas out of the water," and-adds Luke (3. 21), I to modern ears, is scarcely strong enough. 'I delight' * while he was praying;" a grand piece of informa- comes the nearest, perhaps, to that ineffable comtion Can there be a doubt about the burden of that placenow which is manifestly intendedand this is the prayer : & prayer sent up, probably, while yet in the rather to be preferred, as it would immediately carry Water-His blessed head suffused with the baptismal the thoughts back to that sugust Messianic prophecy element: & prayer continued likely as He stepped out to which the voice from heaven plainly alluded of the stream, and again stood upon the dry ground? (Isaiah, 42. 1), “Behold my Servant, whom I uphold; The work before Him, the needed and expected Spirit | mine Elect, IN WHOM MY SOUL DELIGHTETH." Nor to rext upon Him for it, and the glory He would then are the words which follow to be overlooked." I have pat upon the Father that sent Him-would not these I put my Spirit upon Him; He shall bring forth judg. fin His breast, and find silent vent in such form as ment to the Gentiles." (The LXX. pervert this, as this l_ Lo, I come; I delight to do thy will, O God. | they do most of the Messianic predictions, interpoFather, glorify thy name. Show me a token for good. lating the word “Jacob," and applying it to the Jews. Let the Spirit of the Lord God come upon me, and I was this voice heard by the by-standers? From will preach the Gospel to the poor, and heal the Matthew's form of it, one might suppose it so debroken-hearted, and send forth judgment unto vic signed: but it would appear that it was not, and protory. Whilst He was yet speaking-lo, the heavens bably John only heard and saw anything peculiar

an opened Mark says, sublimely, “He saw the about that great baptism. Accordingly, the words Pararens cleaving,” and he saw the Spirit of God de "Hear ye Him" are not added, as at the TransfiguAonding-that is, He only, with the exception of His ration. honoured servant, as he tells us himself, John, 1.

CHAPTER IV. 384. tbe by-standers apparently seeing nothing like Ver 1-11. TEMPTATION OF CHRIST. (=Mark, 1. a dore, and lighting apon him. Luke says, “in a bodily | 12, 13; Luke, 4. 1-13.) 1. Then--an indefinite note of shape (322; that is, the blessed Spirit, assuming the sequence. But Mark's word (1. 12) fixes what we corporeal form of a dove, descended thus upon His should have presumed was meant, that it was "imme

d head. But why in this form? The Scripture diately" after His baptism; and with this agrees the pse of this emblem will be our best guide here. I statement of Luke (4. I). was Jesus led up-i.e., from “My dove, my unde filed is one," says the song (6.0). the low Jordan valley to some more elevated spot. This is chaste purity. Again, “Be ye harmless as of the Spirit-that blessed Spirit immediately before dores," says Christ Himself (Matthew, 10. 16). This spoken of as descending upon Him at His baptism, is the same thing, in the form of inoffensiveness and abiding upon Him. Luke, connecting these two towards men. "A conscience void of offence toward scenes, as if the one were but the sequel of the other, God and toward men" (Acts, 24. 16) expresses both says, "Jesus, being full of the Holy Ghost, returned Further, when we read in the Song (2. 14), “O my from Jordan, and was led.” &c. Mark's expression dure, that art in the clefts of the rock, in the secret has a startling sharpness about it-" Immediately place of the stairs (see Isaiah, 60. 8), let me see thy the Spirit driveth Him." 'putteth,' or 'hurrieth, countenance, let me hear thy voice; for sweet is thy Him forth,' or 'impelleth Him.' (See the same word voice, and thy countenance is comely"-it is shrink- in Mark, 1. 43; 6. 40; Matthew, 9. 25; 13. 62: John, 10. 4.) iprinodesty.meekness, gentleness, that is thus charm- The thought thus strongly expressed is the mighty Lastly depicted. In a word - not to allude to the I constraining impnlse of the Spirit under which He Lusterical einblen of the dove that flew back to the went; while Matthew's more gentle expression, "was vk, bearing in its mouth the olive leaf of peace led up," intimates how purely voluntary on His own Generis, & 11)-when we read (Psalın 68. 13), "Ye part this action was into the wilderness-probably the

ll be the wings of a dove covered with silver, I wild Judean desert. The particular spot which traand her feathers with yellow gold," it is beauteousness dition has fixed upon has hence got the name of that is thus held forth. And was not such that Quarantana or Quarantaria, from the forty days.Holy, harmless, undefled One," the “Separate from an almost perpendicular wall of rock twelve or npera." Thon art fairer than the children of fifteen hundred feet above the plain.' (ROBINSON'S

: race ia poured into Thy lips: therefore God Palestine.) The supposition of those who incline to bath blessed Thee for ever!” But the fourth Gospel place the Temptation amongst the mountains of

us one more piece of information here, on the Moab is, we think, very improbable. to be temptedauthority of one who saw and testified of it: "John The Greek word (peirazein) means simply to try or bus record, saying, I saw the Spirit descending from I make proof of: and when ascribed to God in His tearen like a dove, and IT ABODE UPON HIM." And dealings with men, it means, and can mean no more

we should think that this was an accidental thing.than this. Thus, Genesis, 22. 1, "It came to pass that bents that this last particular was expressly given God did tempt Abraham," or put his faith to a severe

w part of the dion by which he was to recognise proof. (See Deuteronomy, 8. 2) But for the most and indentify Him as the Son of God: “And I knew part in Scripture the word is used in a bad sense, and Hum not: but He that sent me to baptize with water, means to entice, solicit, or provoke to sin. Hence the the name wid unto me, Upon whom thou shalt see name here given to the wicked one-- the tempter" the prit descending AND REMAINING ON HIM, the (v. 3). Accordingly, "to be tempted" here is to be

o He which baptizeth with the Holy Ghost. understood both ways. The Spirit conducted Him All I saw, and bare record that this is the Son of into the wilderness simply to have His faith tried; Go (John L 32-34). And when with this we compare but as the agent in this trial was to be the wicked the tredieted descent of the Spirit upon Messiah one, whose whole object would be to seduce Him (Latau 9. And the Spirit of the Lord shall rest from His allexiance to God, it was a temptation in the

shara," we cannot doubt that it was this perma- bad sense of the term. The unworthy inference Dent and perfect resting of the Holy Ghost upon the I which some would draw from this is energetically

Jesus is Tempted
MATTHEW, IV.

in the Wilderness. repelled by an apostle (James, 1. 13-17). of the devil.sensation of hunger, unfelt during all the forty days, The word signifies a slanderer-one who casts imputa. seems now to have come on in all its keenness-DO tions upon another. Hence that other name given doubt to open a door to the tempter, of which he is him (Revelation, 12. 10). "The accuser of the brethren, not slow to avail himself: 9.d.. Thon still clingest to who accuseth them before our God day and night." that vainglorious confidence, that thou art the Son of Mark (1. 13) says, “He was forty days tempted of God, carried away by those illusory scenes at the JorSatan," a word signifying an adrersary, one who lies dan. Thou wast born in a stable--but thou art tho in wait for, or sets himself in opposition to another. Son of God! hurried off to Egypt for fear of Herod's These and other names of the same fallen spirit wrath-but thou art the Son of God! a carpenter's roof point to different features in his character or opera- supplied thee with a home, and in the obscurity of & tions. What was the high design of this? First, as despicable town of Galilee thou hast spent thirty we judge, to give our Lord a taste of what lay before yearg-yet still thou art the Son of God, and a voice Him in the work He had undertaken; next, to make from heaven, it seems, proclaimed it in thine ears at trial of the glorious furniture for it which He had just the Jordan! Be it so: but after that, surely thy days received; further, to give Him encouragement, by the of obscurity and trial should have an end. Why victory now to be won, to go forward spoiling prin- linger for weeks in this desert, wandering among the cipalities and powers, until at length He should make wild beasts and craggy rocks, unhonoured, unata show of them openly, triumphing over them in tended, unpitied, ready to starve for want of the His Cross; that the tempter, too, might get a taste, at necessaries of life? Is this befitting "the Son of God! the very outset, of the new kind of material in Man At the bidding of "the Son of God" sure those stones which he would find he had here to deal with; shall all be turned into loaves, and in a moment finally, that He might acquire experimental ability present an abundant repast? 4. But he answered and "to succour them that are tempted" (Hebrews, 2. 18). said, It is written (Deuteronomy, 8. 3), Man shall not The temptation evidently embraced two stages: the live by bread alone--more emphatically, as in the Greek, one continuing throughout the forty days' fast: the 'Not by bread alone shall man live' - but by every other, at the conclusion of that period. FIRST STAGE:word that proceedeth out of the mouth of God. Of all 2. And when he had fasted forty days and forty nights. passages in Old Testament scripture, none could Luke says, “When they were quite ended." he was have been pitched upon more apposite, perhaps not afterward an hungered-evidently implying that the one so apposite, to our Lord's purpose. "The Lord sensation of hunger was unfelt during all the forty | led thee (said Moses to Israel, at the close of their days; coming on only at their close. So it was ap- journeyings) these forty years in the wilderness, to parently with Moses (Exodus, 34. 28) and Elijah humble thee, and to prove thee, to know what was (1 Kings, 19. 8) for the same period. A supernatural in thine heart, whether thou wouldest keep his com. power of endurance was of course imparted to the mandments, or no. And he humbled thee, and suf. body, but this probably operated through a natural fered thee to hunger, and fed thee with manna, law-the absorption of the Redeemer's spirit in the which thou knewest not, neither did thy fathers know: dread conflict with the tempter. (See on Acts, 0. 9.) that he might make thee know that man doth not Had we only this Gospel, we should suppose the live by bread only." &c. 'Now, if Israel spent, not temptation did not begin till after this. But it is forty days, but forty years in a waste, howling wilderclear, from Mark's statement that "He was in the ness, where there were no means of human subsistwilderness forty days tempted of Satan," and Luke's ence, not starving, but divinely provided for, on * being forty days tempted of the devil," that there purpose to prove to every age that human support

forty days' temptation before the three specific depends not upon bread, but upon God's unfailing temptations afterwards recorded. And this is what word of promise and pledge of all needful providen. we have called the First Stage. What the precise tial care, am I, distrusting this word of God, and nature and object of the forty days' temptation was despairing of relief, to take the law into my own is not recorded. But two things seem plain enough. hand? True, the Son of God is able enough to turn First, the tempter had utterly failed of his object, stones into bread: but what the Son of God is able to else it had not been renewed; and the terms in which do is not the present question, but what is Man's he opens his second attack imply as much. But duty under want of the necessaries of life. And as further, the tempter's whole object during the forty Israel's condition in the wilderness did not justify days evidently was to get Him to distrust the heavenly | their unbelieving murmurings and frequent desperatestimony borne to Him at His baptism as THE Son tion, so neither would mine warrant the exercise of OF GOD - to persuade Him to regard it as but a the power of the Son of God in snatching despairingly splendid illusion - and, generally, to dislodge from I at unwarranted relief. As man, therefore, I will His breast the consciousness of His Sonship. With await divine supply, nothing doubting that at the fitwhat plausibility the events of His previous history ting time it will arrive.' The second temptation in from the beginning would be urged upon Him in sup. this Gospel is in Luke's the third That Matthew's port of this temptation it is easy to imagine. And it order is the right one will appear, we think, pretty makes much in support of this view of the forty days clearly in the sequel. 5. Then the devil taketh him up temptation, that the particulars of it are not recorded: -rather, 'conducteth him'- into the holy city - SO for how the details of such a purely internal struggle called (as in Isaiah, 48. 2; Nehemiah, 11. 1) from its could be recorded it is hard to see. If this be correct. being "the city of the Great King." the seat of tho how naturally does the SECOND STAGE of the tempta- temple, the metropolis of all Jewish worship. and tion open! In Mark's brief notice of the temptation setteth him on a pinnacle - rather, 'the pinnacle-of there is one expressive particular not given either by the temple-a certain well-known projection. Whether Matthew or by Luke-that "He was with the wild this refer to the highest summit of the temple, whicha beasts," no doubt to add terror to solitude, and ag- bristled with golden spikes (JOSEPHUS Antiquities, gravate the horrors of the whole scene. 3. And when 6. 5. 6); or whether it refer to another peak, on Herode the tempter came to him. Evidently we have here a royal portico, overhanging the ravine of Kedron, at new scene. he said, If thou be the Son of God, command the valley of Hinnom--an immense tower built on the that these stones be made bread - rather, 'loaves,' an- very edge of this precipice, from the top of which swering to "stones" in the plural; whereas Luke, dizzy height Josephus says one could not look to the having said, "Command this stone," in the singular, bottom (Antiquitues, 16. 11, 6)-is not certain; but the adds, "that it be made bread." in the singular. The latter is probably meant. 6. And saith unto him. If thom

Jesw is Templed
MATTHEW, IV.

of the Devil be the Son of God. As this temptation starts with the and still further, is it not said that Christ came to sune point as the first-our Lord's determination not destroy by His death him that hath the power of to be disputed out of His Sonship-it seems to us death, that is, the devil?" (Hebrews, 2. 14.) No doubt clear that the one came directly after the other; and these passages only express men's voluntary subjecas the remaining temptation shows that the hope of tion to the rule of the wicked one while they live, carrying that point was abandoned, and all was staked and his power to surround death to them, when it upon a desperate venture, we think that remaining comes, with all the terrors of the wages of sin. But temptation is thus shown to be the last: as will appear as this is a real and terrible sway, so all Scripture restill more when we come to it. cast thyself down presents men as righteously sold under it. In this ** from hence," Luke, 4 9: for it is written (Psalm 91. sense he speaks what is not devoid of truth, when 11. 12). But what is this I see?' exclaims stately he says. "All this is delivered unto me." But how BISHOP HALL, Satan himself with a Bible under does he deliver this "to whomsoever he will" As hus arm and a text in his mouth!" Doubtless the employing whomsoever he pleases of his willing sub tempter. having felt the power of God's word in the jects in keeping men under his power. In this case former temptation, was eager to try the effect of it his offer to our Lord was that of a deputed supremacy from bis own mouth (2 Corinthians, 11. 14). He shall commensurate with his own, though as his gift and give his angels charge concerning thee; and in-rather, | for his ends. if thou wilt fall down and worship me. *on'-their hands they shall bear thee up, lest at any time | This was the sole, but monstrous condition. No thou dash thy foot against a stone. The quotation is Scripture, it will be observed, is quoted now, because precisely as it stands in the Hebrew and LXX., save none could be found to support so blasphemous a that after the first clause the words, "to keep thee claim. In fact, he has ceased now to present his in all thy ways," is here omitted. Not a few good temptations under the mask of piety, and stands out expositors have thought that this omission was in- unblushingly as the rival of God Himself in his claims tentional, to conceal the fact that this would not on the homage of men. Despairing of success as an have been one of " His ways," i.e., of duty. But as angel of light, he throws off all disguise, and with a our Lord's reply makes no allusion to this, but seizes splendid bribe solicits divine honour. This again on the great principle involved in the promise quoted: shows that we are now at the last of the temptations, so when we look at the promise itself, it is plain that and that Matthew's order is the true one. 10. Then the sense of it is precisely the same whether the saith Jesus unto him, Get thee hence, Satan. Since the clause in question be inserted or not. 7. Jesus said tempter has now thrown off the mask, and stands Ento him, It is written again (Deuteronomy, 6. 16-9.d., forth in his true character, our Lord no longer deals * True, it is so written, and on that promise I im. with him as a pretended friend and pious counsellor, plictly rely; but in using it there is another scripture but calls him by his right name-His knowledge of which must not be forgotten, Thou shalt not tempt the which from the outset He had carefully concealed till Lord thy God Preservation in danger is divinely | now-and orders him off. This is the final and conpledged: shall I then create danger, either to put the clusive evidence, as we think, that Matthew's must promised security sceptically to the proof, or wantonly be the right order of the temptations. For who to demand display of it? That were to "tempt the I can well conceive of the tempter's returning to the Lord my God," which, being expressly forbidden, | assault after this, in the pious character again, and would forfeit the right to expect preservation.' 8. hoping still to cislodge the consciousness of His SonAgain, the devil taketh him up-' conducteth him,' as ship; while our Lord must in that case be supposed to before-into, or 'unto,' an exceeding high mountain, and quote Scripture to one He had called the Devil to eboweth him all the kingdoms of the world, and the glory his face-thus throwing His pearls before worse than of them. Luke 14. 6) adds the important clause, "in & | swine? for it is written (Deuteronomy, 6. 13): Thus moment of time;" a clause which seems to furnish does our Lord part with Satan on the rock of Scripa key to the true meaning. That a scene was pre I ture, Thou shalt worship. In the Hebrew and LXX. sented to our Lord's natural eye seems plainly ex I it is, "Thou shalt fear.” but as the sense is the same, pressed But to limit this to the most extensive scene so "worship" is here used to show emphatically that which the natural eye conld take in, is to give a what the tempter claimed was precisely what God sense to the expression, "all the kingdoms of the had forbidden. the Lord thy God, and him only shalt world," quite violent. It remains, then, to gather thou serve. The word "serve" in the second clanse, is from the expression, "in a moment of time"-which one never used by the LXX. of any but religious sermanifestly is intended to intimate some superna | vice; and in this sense exclusively is it used in the tural operation that it was permitted to the tempter | New Testament, as we find it here. Once more tho to extend preternaturally for a moment our Lord's | word "only," in the second clause-not expressed in range of vision, and throw a "glory" or glitter over the Hebrew and LXX.-is here added to bring out the scene of vision; a thing not inconsistent with the emphatically the negative and prohibitory feature of uslogs of other scriptural statements regarding the the command. (See Galatians, 3. 10 for a similar Dermitted operations of the wicked one. In this | supplement of the word "all" in & quotation from cee, the "exceeding height of the "mountain" from Deuteronomy, 27. 26.) 11. Then the devil leaveth him which this right was beheld would favour the effect | Luke says, “And when the devil had exhausted"latended to be produced. 9. And saith unto him. Allor, quite ended,' as in Luke, 4. 2-"every modo these things will I give thee-"and the glory of them," of] temptation, he departed from him till a season." adds Lake. But Matthew having already said that | The definite "season" here indicated is expressly rethis was "showed Him," did not need to repeat it ferred to by our Lord in John, 14. 30, and Luke, 22. Late Lake (4. 6 adds these other very important 62, 63. and, behold, angels came and ministered unto him causes, here omitted-" for that is," or 'has been, -or supplied Him with food, as the same expression "delivered unto me, and to whomsoever I will I give means in Mark, 1. 31, and Luke, 8. 3. Thus did IL" Was this wholly false? That were not like | angels to Elijah (1 Kings, 19. 6-8). Excellent critics Satan's usual policy, which is to insinuate his lies think that they ministered, not food only, but superunder cover of some truth. What truth, then, is | natural support and cheer also. But this would be there here? We answer. Is not Satan thrice called the natural effect rather than the direct object of the by our Lord Himself, the prince of this world?" visit, which was plainly what we have expressed. Wohn, 12 31:14. 30: 16. 11: does not the apostle call | And after having refused to claim the illegitimate

"the god of this world (2 Corinthians, 4. A:) | ministration of angels in His behall, O with what deep

« НазадПродовжити »