Great Expectations, Том 1

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printed at the Riverside Press, 1868
 

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LibraryThing Review

Рецензія користувача  - HerbThomas - LibraryThing

Great Expectations was assigned reading when I was in ninth grade. I thought it was the most dreary thing I had ever read. Sensing that the memories from my youth might be mistaken, I tried again. I ... Читати огляд повністю

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Сторінка 5 - My father's family name being Pirrip, and my Christian name Philip, my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or more explicit than Pip. So, I called myself Pip, and came to be called Pip. I give Pirrip as my father's family name, on the authority of his tombstone and my sister — Mrs. Joe Gargery, who married the blacksmith. As I never saw my father or my mother, and never saw any likeness of either of them (for their days were long before the days of photographs), my first fancies...
Сторінка 6 - Roger, infant children of the aforesaid, were also dead and buried; and that the dark flat wilderness beyond the churchyard, intersected with dykes and mounds and gates, with scattered cattle feeding on it, was the marshes; and that the low leaden line beyond was the river; and that the distant savage lair from which the wind was rushing, was the sea; and that the small bundle of shivers growing afraid of it all and beginning to cry, was Pip. "Hold your noise!" cried a terrible voice, as a man started...
Сторінка 6 - Ours was the marsh country, down by the river, within, as the river wound, twenty miles of the sea. My first most vivid and broad impression of the identity of things, seems to me to have been gained on a memorable raw afternoon towards evening.
Сторінка 12 - Joe was a fair man, with curls of flaxen hair on each side of his smooth face, and with eyes of such a very undecided blue that they seemed to have somehow got mixed with their own whites. He was a mild, good-natured, sweet-tempered, easy-going, foolish, dear fellow — a sort of Hercules in strength, and also in weakness.
Сторінка 9 - I am a keeping that young man from harming of you at the present moment with great difficulty. I find it wery hard to hold that young man off of your inside. Now, what do you say ? " I said that I would get him the file, and I would get him what broken bits of food I could, and I would come to him at the Battery, early in the morning. " Say Lord strike you dead if you don't ! " said the man. I said so, and he took me down. "Now...
Сторінка 5 - Wife of the Above," I drew a childish conclusion that my mother was freckled and sickly. To five little stone lozenges, each about a foot and a half long, which were arranged in a neat row beside their grave, and were sacred to the memory of five little brothers of mine — who gave up trying to get a living exceedingly early in that universal struggle...
Сторінка 222 - London. We Britons had at that time particularly settled that it was treasonable to doubt our having and our being the best of everything ; otherwise, while I was scared by the immensity of London, I think I might have had some faint doubts whether it was not rather ugly, crooked, narrow, and dirty. Mr. Jaggers had duly sent me his address ; it was Little Britain ; and he had written after it on his card, " Just out of Smithfield, and close by the coach-office.
Сторінка 316 - She had adopted Estella, she had as good as adopted me, and it could not fail to be her intention to bring us together. She reserved it for me to restore the desolate house, admit the sunshine into the dark rooms, set the clocks a going and the cold hearths a blazing, tear down the cobwebs, destroy the vermin — in short, do all the shining deeds of the young Knight of romance, and marry the Princess.
Сторінка 6 - A fearful man, all in coarse grey, with a great iron on his leg. A man with no hat, and with broken shoes, and with an old rag tied round his head. A man who had been soaked in water, and smothered in mud, and lamed by stones, and cut by flints, and stung by nettles, and torn by briars ; who limped and shivered, and glared and growled; and whose teeth chattered in his head as he seized me by the chin. "O! Don't cut my throat, sir,
Сторінка 187 - You shall well and truly try, and true deliverance make, between our Sovereign Lord the King and the prisoner at the bar, whom you shall have in charge, and a true verdict give, according to the evidence. So help you God.

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