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Fruit large, roundish-oblong, tapering towards the stalk, with an extremely uneven knobby surface, usually measuring about three inches and a half each way, or four inches deep, and three inches and a half in diameter, but sometimes much larger. Eye deeply sunk in an irregular hollow. Stalk an inch long, stout, deeply inserted in an irregular cavity. Skin dull yellow, copiously and irregularly spotted with broad russet patches. Flesh rich, melting, very juicy, and highflavoured, with a most agreeable perfume. Ripe in October and November. This succeeds extremely well on the Quince, as well as the Pear. The Duchess of Angoulême, the very finest of the late autumn Pears, is said to have been found wild in a hedge of the Forest of Armaillé, near Angers. It arrives at a weight unusual in Pears that are fit for the dessert. Jersey specimens have been seen, which measured four inches and three quarters long, and four inches and a halfin diameter, weighing twenty-two ounces. The trees bear very early and certainly, especially if grafted upon the Quince stock, for which the sort is particularly well adapted. It is said to have derived its name from having been found in July, 1815, when the reigning family in France returned, for the second time, to the head of the government. 81. ENGLISH BEURRÉ, of some Collections. Hort. Trans. Vol. iii. p. 207. Beurré d’Angleterre. Duhamel, No. 76. t. 39. Fruit middle-sized, of an oval pyramidal figure, very regularly formed at the crown, and tapering to the stalk; about two inches and three quarters long, and two inches in diameter. Eye small, with a short connivent calyx, very little depressed. Stalk one inch and a quarter long, slender, inserted without any cavity. Skin smooth, of a greenish grey, a little tinged with red on the sunny side. Flesh white, very buttery, and replete with a sugary and very agreeable juice. Ripe the end of September and beginning of October. This succeeds only on the Pear, not on the Quince. It is clearly distinct from the Brown Beurré, as it does not succeed when grafted upon the Quince ; the other succeeds well on both. 82. FLEMISH BEAUTY. Pom. Mag. t. 128. Bouche Nouvelle. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 451. Brilliant. Ib. 157. Fondante de Bois. Ib. 270. Imperatrice de la France. Ib. 338. La Belle de Flandres. Ib. 40. according to the Pom. Mag. Fruit rather large, oblong, a little uneven in its outline, and somewhat elongated on the side opposite to the branch on which it grows; about three inches and a quarter long, and two inches and three quarters in diameter. Eye open, with a short calyx, prominently placed on a flat crown, or in a very slight depression. Stalk an inch long, inserted in a narrow oblique cavity. Skin pale yellow, the greater part of which is covered with a thin cinnamon russet, having a faint streak or two of pale brown appearing through on the sunny side. Flesh yellowish white, a little gritty, but becoming tender and mellow, and full of a rich, saccharine, slightly musky juice. Ripe the beginning of October, and will keep a month or longer. A very fine Flemish variety, grown in the Horticultural Garden at Chiswick, upon an open standard. It ought to be gathered before it is fully ripe, otherwise it loses much of its goodness. 83. FRANCHIPANNE. Duhamel, No. 85. t. 47. f. 2. Frangipane. Jard. Fruit. t. 41.

Fruit pretty large, of a pyramidal turbinate figure, compressed between the middle and the stalk; about two inches and three quarters long, and two inches and a quarter in diameter. Eye rather large, seated in a shallow plaited basin. Stalk an inch long, strong, bent, and obliquely inserted in a small cavity. Skin smooth, of a clear yellow or citron colour, but of a bright red on the sunny side. Flesh melting, with a sugary perfumed juice. Ripe the end of October and beginning of November. This succeeds on both the Pear and the Quince. 84. GENDESEIM. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 287. Fruit middle-sized, pyramidal, a little uneven in its outline, about three inches and a quarter deep, and two inches and a half in diameter. Eye small, rather open, in a narrow, shallow depression. Stalk an inch long, crooked, diagonally inserted, under a large, curved, elongated lip. Skin yellowish green, full of grey specks, and slightly covered with thin patches of grey russet. Flesh a little gritty, but mellow, and full of a saccharine, rich, and slightly musky juice. Ripe the end of September and beginning of October. This is another of the new Flemish Pears, which is grown in the Horticultural Garden at Chiswick, upon an open standard. 85. GREEN SUGAR. Miller, No. 42. Sucre-vert. Duhamel, No. 68. t. 34. Fruit middle-sized, somewhat oblong, but very regularly formed, a little in the manner of a Bergamotte, but narrower towards the stalk, about two inches and three quarters long, and two inches and a half in diameter. Eye small, open, with a diverging calyx, in a very slight, narrow depression. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, strong, slightly inserted in a small uneven cavity. Skin smooth, very green, which continues till it is ripe. Flesh

a little gritty, but very buttery. Juice abundant, highly sugary, and of a very agreeable musky flavour. Ripe the middle and end of October. This succeeds on both the Pear and the Quince. *85. HA con’s INcompar ABLE. Fruit middle-sized, somewhat turbinate, and a little irregular in its outline, occasioned by one or two slightly protuberant angles near its crown; about two inches and a half deep, and three inches in diameter. Eye small, open ; segments of the calyx short and narrow, slightly sunk in a rather wide uneven depression. Stalk an inch long, rather stout, inserted in a somewhat lipped and rather deep cavity. Skin rugose, pale yellow, or yellowish white, a good deal mixed with green, and partially covered with a greyish orange russet, particularly round the stalk. Flesh yellowish white, slightly gritty, but very buttery and melting. Juice abundant, very saccharine, extremely rich, and possessing a high, musky, and perfumed flavour. In perfection in November and December. This very valuable and excellent Pear was raised by Mr. James Gent Hacon, of Downham Market, in Norfolk, from a seed of what is called in that neighbourhood Rayner's Norfolk Seedling. The tree is an open standard, about sixteen years old, and sixteen feet high, with pendulous branches, which reach nearly to the ground. It bears most abundantly, and may be justly considered one of the best Pears ever raised in this country. It was exhibited at the meeting of the Horticultural Society in Norwich on the 17th November, 1830, when it obtained the silver medal as a prize. 86. HAzEL PEAR. Hort. Trans. Vol. vii. p. 310. Fruit rather small, oval, somewhat turbinate, about

* No. 85. is inserted twice, in consequence of Hacon's Incomparable having been sent me after the numerical arrangement had been completed.

two inches long, and one inch and a half in diameter. Eye small, with a very short acute calyx, placed in a rather shallow basin. Stalk an inch long, obliquely inserted. Skin yellowish, very much freckled. Flesh nearly white, with a very pleasant and agreeable juice. Ripe the end of October, and will keep a few weeks only. It is uncertain where this Pear originated. It is now extensively cultivated by the Scotch nurserymen; and for its early bearing, and abundant produce, it is by them highly esteemed. 87 . HENRY THE FourTH. Henri Quatre. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 324. Fruit below the middle size, pyramidal, and somewhat oblique at the crown, about three inches long, and two inches and a quarter broad. Eye small, open, with a short slender calyx, slightly sunk in a narrow, shallow, oblique depression. Stalk an inch long, crooked, curved, obliquely inserted under a small elongated lip. Skin pale yellow, mixed with green ; on the sunny side of an orange-brown, and full of small, grey, russetty specks, which are the more numerous as they approach the crown. Flesh pale yellow, a little gritty, but very tender and melting. Juice abundant, highly saccharine, with a slight musky perfume. Ripe the end of September, and will keep a few weeks only. This is a very excellent dessert Pear, and is grown in the Horticultural Garden at Chiswick upon an open

standard. 88. INcom MUN1cABLE. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 340.

L’Incommunicable. Hort. Trans. Vol. v. App. ii. p. 6. Fruit above the middle size, pyramidal, and compressed towards the stalk, about three inches and a half long, and two inches and a half in diameter. Eye small, closed by a very short slender calyx, and placed in a very

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