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Ripe the middle and end of August. There is no doubt that this is the real Vermash Nectarine, which is very well figured by Mr. HookER in his Pomona Londinensis. The tree, from which the drawing published in that work was taken, was at Hampton Court, where I examined it in 1823. Mr. Padley, his Majesty's gardener at that time, informed me he had purchased it from Mr. Grimwood, of Chelsea, about 1783. Mr. Hooker's statement, that it was brought from France, appears to want confirmation, as the French books contain no account of a melting Nectarine of this description, with large flowers. The tree is tender, and requires to be planted against a south wall. • 19. VioleT HATIVE. G. Lindl. in Hort. TransVol. v. p. 552. Petite Violette Hative. Duhamel, 22. t. 16. f. 2. Violet. Pom. Mag. t. 68. Lord Selsey’s Elruge. Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 523. Large Scarlet. Of some Collections, according to the Pom. Mag. Leaves crenate, with reniform glands. Flowers small, bright red. Fruit middle-sized, somewhat broader at the base than at the apex; cavity of the stalk middle

sized ; the point which marks the base of the style sel

dom projects, but is generally in a shallow cleft, which runs across the apex. Skin, where exposed, dark purplish red, intermixed or mottled with pale brown dots ; next the wall pale yellowish green. Flesh whitish, a very pale yellowish green, tinged with red next the stone, from which it separates freely; melting, juicy, and rich, Stone middle-sized, roundish, obovate, its fissures not so deep nor so sharp as those of the Common Elruge; their ridges flattish, but rough, and of a red colour, by which it may be always distinguished from the fruit just mentioned, the stone of which is pale, with no rays of red passing from it into the flesh.

Ripe from the end of August to the middle of September.

This is a most excellent Nectarine, and ought to be found in every good collection of fruit.

The Piolet Hative, although of French origin, has long been known in this country under the name of Piolet simply. As the French find the necessity of this designation, it is adopted here, because there are other Piolette Nectarines which require appellations to distinguish them one from another; besides there appears no good reason for reducing a definitive name in this case, any more than there would be in those of the Avants, the Mignonnes, and the Madeleines among the peaches. All our practical gardeners write for the Violet Hative if they want this fruit.

SECT. III. Pavies, or Clingstones.

20. BLAck NEwingtoN. G. Lindl, plan of an Orchard, 1796. Ih. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 541. Leaves doubly serrated, without glands. Flowers large. Fruit large, almost globular, rather more broad than long. Skin pale green on the shaded side, but of a dark muddy red, or nearly black, where exposed to the sun. Flesh very firm, pale green, but deep red at the stone, to which it firmly adheres. Juice sugary, vinous, and perfumed. Stone large, rugged, almost round. Ripe the beginning and middle of September. The Newington Nectarine, as well as all others belonging to this section, is in its highest perfection when the skin begins to shrivel. 21. BRUGNoN Violet Musquí. Duhamel, 26. t. 18. Brugnon Musqué. Lelieur. Leaves cremate, with reniform glands. Flowers large. Fruit middle-sized, somewhat ovate, generally terminated by an acute nipple. Skin very smooth, of a pale

and almost transparent amber colour on the shaded side,
but where exposed to the sun, of a bright deep scarlet.
Flesh firm, yellowish white, but very red at the stone,
to which it firmly adheres. Juice sugary, vinous, and
well flavoured.
Ripe the beginning and middle of September.
This Nectarine is quoted by Mr. Aiton, in his Epi-
tome, as a synonyme of the Red Roman; had both sorts
come under his own observation, he would, however,
have been satisfied of their wide difference. The Red
Roman is nearly twice the size of this, very different in
both shape and colour, and of superior merit. The
Brugnon Violet Musqué appears not to have been known
to Miller; and the Red Roman was not known to the
French, at least it is not to be found in any of their
books.
22. EARLY NEwingtoN. Aiton’s Epitome.
Early Black Newington. Nurs. Catalogues.
Lucombe's Black. Forsyth.
Lucombe's Seedling. Nurs. Catalogues.
Leaves doubly serrated, without glands. Flowers
large. Fruit somewhat below the middle size, inclining
to ovate, a little compressed on one side of the suture;
fuller on the other, narrowed at the apex, and termi-
nating with an acute nipple. Skin pale green on the
shaded side, but of a bright red next the sun, marbled
and mottled with a much deeper colour, and curved with
a thin violet bloom. Flesh greenish white, but very
red at the stone, to which it closely adheres. Juice
sugary and well flavoured.
Ripe the end of August and beginning of Sep-
tember.
Several varieties of the Newington Nectarine, within
the last forty years, have been raised from seed in this
country, and have had different names assigned them,

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which has caused no small difficulty in the arrangement of their synonymes. The Early Newington and Early Black Newington have been ascertained, in Kensington Gardens, to be the same ; and Lucombe's Black and Lucombe's Seedling want characters to distinguish them from the Early Newington. 23. GoLDEN. Langley, t. 29. f. 5. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 551.. Miller, No. 8. Leaves cremate, with reniform glands. Flowers small. Fruit middle-sized, somewhat ovate, narrowed at the apex, and terminated by an acute nipple. Skin bright yellow next the wall, but on the sunny side of a bright scarlet, shaded with a few streaks of a darker colour. Flesh yellow, firm, but red at the stone, to which it closely adheres. Juice not abundant, but of pretty good flavour. Ripe the beginning and middle of September. This Nectarine ripened at Twickenham, in 1727, on a west wall, August 20. O.S., or August 31. N. S. Langley. . 24. ITALIAN. Langley, t. 29. f. 4. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 554. Brugnon, or Italian. Miller, No. 5. Leaves cremate, with reniform glands. Flowers small. Fruit large, somewhat globular. Skin greenish yellow next the wall, dark red next the sun, and marbled with a darker colour, interspersed with a little thin grey russet. Flesh firm, of a pale yellowish colour, but very red at the stone, to which it closely adheres. Juice abundant, rich, and excellent. Ripe the middle and end of August. 25, RED Roy AN. Forsyth. Roman. Langley, p. 102. t. 29. f. 2. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans, Vol. v. p. 548. Roman Red. Miller, No. 6.

Leaves crenate, with reniform glands. Flowers large. Fruit of the largest size, frequently measuring eight inches and a quarter in circumference, somewhat globular, and a little flattened at its apex. Skin greenish yellow next the wall, but where exposed to the sun of a deep muddy red or purple colour, somewhat scabrous, with brown russetty specks. Flesh firm, greenish yellow, but very red at the stone, to which it firmly adheres. Juice plentiful, sugary, of a very high and vinous flavour.

Ripe the beginning and middle of September.

This Nectarine ripened at Twickenham, in 1727, on a south wall, July 30. O. S., or August 10. N. S. Langley.

The Red Roman Nectarine has been cultivated in our gardens about two centuries, as appears by Parkinson's List in 1629, and is one of the largest and best in our present collections. How it should have been mistaken by practical men I am at a loss to conceive, as a melting fruit has been for years sold in many of our nurseries under this name, although all writers have described it as a Pavie, or Clingstone.

At present it is very difficult to be met with ; but steps have been taken to render it again plentiful, by furnishing cuttings from a tree I raised thirty years ago, to Mrs. Mackie of Norwich, of whom it may now be had with a degree of certainty.

26. SAINT OMER's. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 541.

Saint Omer's. Hanbury, No. 10.

Leaves doubly serrated, without glands. Flowers large. Fruit middle-sized, somewhat ovate, and generally terminated by an acute nipple. Skin bright red next the sun, and of a pale amber yellow on the shaded side. Flesh firm, yellowish white, but very red at the

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