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It is the largest and best of our melting Nectarines, and ought to be in every good collection of fruit. 9. CLAREMONT. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 551. Leaves crenate, with reniform glands. Flowers small. Fruit middle-sized, slightly ovate. Skin pale green next the wall, but of a deep muddy red next the sun, intermixed with a little dark brown russet: as it ripens the skin shrivels like that of the Newington. Flesh pale greenish white to the stone, where it is slightly tinged with red, and from which it separates. Juice plentiful, and excellently well flavoured. Stone rather large, oblong, thick, deeply rugged. Ripe the beginning and middle of September. This Nectarine was raised at Esher, in Surrey, about the year 1750, by John Greening, gardener to the Duke of Newcastle, who then lived at Claremont. In 1759 it produced its first fruit, against a south wall, in the Great Tool-house quarter at Hampton Court. The above description was taken from fruit produced upon a tree at Heydon Hall, in Norfolk, thirty years ago, which had been purchased of Robert Lowe, a nurseryman at Hampton Wick, in 1766, who had propagated his stock from the tree in the royal gardens, where he had been foreman for several years. It is frequently sold in the nurseries under the name of Elruge. 10. CoMMON ELRUGE. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 551. Pom. Mag. t. 49. Leaves crenate, with reniform glands. Flowers small, pale dull red. Fruit middle-sized, inclining to oval; channel shallow at the base, gradually deeper towards the apex. Skin deep violet or blood colour, when exposed, with minute brownish specks; paler in the shade. Flesh whitish, melting, very juicy, rich, and high-flavoured; a little stained with red next the stone, from which it parts freely. Stone middle-sized,

oval, slightly pointed, pale, in which it differs from the .

Violet Hàtive, the stone of which is deep red. Ripe the end of August and beginning of September. It is difficult to explain why the name of Elruge should have been given to this nectarine. The true Elruge has been so well described by Miller, that it appears marvellous the misapplication of its name should not have been discovered many years ago; and, what is still more surprising, the original fruit is, perhaps, no where now to be found. It will be described under the name of Miller's Elruge. 11. DUC DU TELLIER’s. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 551. Du Tellier's. Aiton's Epitome. 5. Tello, } Nurserymen's Catalogues. Leaves crenate, with reniform glands. Flowers small, bright pale crimson. Fruit above the middle size, somewhat oblong, compressed near the suture, and having a few obscure angles near the base, and a little narrowed at the apex. Skin pale green next the wall, marbled with deep red or purple next the sun, on a somewhat tawny ground. Flesh greenish white, melting, of a faint red next the stone, from which it separates. Juice sweet and very well flavoured. Stone obtuse, thick. Ripe the end of August and beginning of September. This requires to be budded upon the Pear Plum. 12. MILLER's ELRUGE. G. Lindl. Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 541. Elruge. Langley, p. 102. t. 29. f. 8. Miller, Ed. 8. No. 2. Elrouge. Switzer, p. 92. Leaves doubly serrated, without glands. Flower" small. Fruit middle-sized, rather more long than

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broad. Skin greenish yellow on the shaded side; but
when exposed to the sun, of a dark red or purple
colour. Flesh greenish yellow, melting and juicy, of
a very excellent flavour, and separates from the stone.
Ripe the beginning and middle of August.
This nectarine ripened at Twickenham, in 1727, on
a south wall, July 30. O.S., or August 10. N. S.
Langley.
The Elruge nectarine, like the red Roman, has been
widely mistaken by gardeners, although, till the intro-
duction of Hunt's small Tawny, there was not any
nectarine in this country, if elsewhere, which could be
arranged in the same class, division, subdivision, and
section, with the Elruge of Miller. When the classifi-
cation of peaches and nectarines was published in the
Hort. Trans, in 1824, I expressed my doubts of the
sort being then in existence: this impression is not
removed; for notwithstanding the circulation of that
paper by the Society throughout every part of Great
Britain, it has not to this day been received into the
Chiswick Garden. If any spirited nurseryman would
offer a hundred guineas for its recovery, he would
amply repay himself by its sale.
Elruge, or Elrouge, is a sort of lame anagram of
Gurle or Gourle, the name of a nurseryman at Hoddes-
don, in Hertfordshire, in the reign of Charles the
Second, who is said to have raised this nectarine.
18. MURRY. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v.
p. 552. Miller, No. 7.
Murrey. Ray, 7.
Leaves crenate, with reniform glands. Flowers small.
Fruit middle-sized, rather more long than broad, nar-
row at the apex, with a little more fulness on one side
of the suture than on the other. Skin dark red or
purple, pale green next the wall. Flesh pale greenish
white, melting, and separates from the stone. Juice
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sweet, and well flavoured. Stone oblong, obtuse, and almost smooth. Ripe the middle and end of August. 14. ÖRD’s NEC TARINE. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 554. Leaves crenate, with reniform glands. Flowers small, dark brown. Fruit somewhat below the middle size, rather ovate, and swelled a little more on one side of the suture than the other. Skin greenish yellow, on the side next the wall, but of a deep purple where exposed to the sun. Flesh melting, greenish yellow, with a little red at the stone, from which it separates. Juice plentiful, of a very excellent flavour. Ripe the beginning and middle of September. 15. PITMASTon ORANGE. Hort. Trans. Vol. iv. p. 232. t. 6. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 544.

Leaves crenate, with globose glands. Flowers large,

of a beautiful bright rose colour. Fruit of a good size, wide at the base, almost heart-shaped, the summit being elongated, and terminating in an acute nipple. Skin smooth, of a dark brownish red on the side exposed to the sun, and of a rich yellow on the other side : at the junction of the columns, the red is blended with the yellow, in streaks and dots, and on the darkest part are a few streaks of an almost black purple hue. Flesh melting, deep yellow or orange colour, with a narrow radiated circle of bright crimson round the stone, from which it separates. Juice plentiful, high flavoured, and saccharine. Stone rather small, narrow, sharp pointed and rugged. Ripe the middle of August to the beginning of September. This very valuable nectarine was raised by John Williams, Esq. of Pitmaston, near Worcester, from a seed of the common Elruge, which ripened in 1815.

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It is, at present, the only nectarine in the fourth section of the second class, in the synoptical arrangement, which see, at the end of this article. 16. SCARLET. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. 5. p. 552. Miller, No. 4. Leaves crenate, with reniform glands. Flowers small. Fruit middle-sized, somewhat ovate, generally terminating in a small acute nipple. Skin bright deep scarlet, tinged with violet on the sunny side: pale green next the wall. Flesh greenish white, but red at the stone, from which it separates. Juice sugary and well flavoured. Stone oval, acute pointed, almost smooth. Ripe the end of August and beginning of September. 17. TEMPLE. Langley, Pom. t. 30. f. 1. Temple's. Miller, No. 9. Leaves crenate, with reniform glands. Flowers small, pale. Fruit below the middle size, somewhat ovate, with a slight suture. Skin greenish yellow on the shaded side, but of a carnation red next the sun. Flesh pale yellow to the stone, from which it separates. Juice very well flavoured. Ripe the beginning and middle of September. This nectarine ripened at Twickenham in 1727, on a west wall, September 4. O.S., or September 15. N. S. Langley. 18. VERMASH. Hooker, Pom. Lond, t. 29. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 548. Leaves crenate, with reniform glands, Flowers large, deep rose colour. Fruit small, roundish, tapering a little towards the apex. Skin very smooth, of an intense red colour on the side next the sun; greenish on the other side. Flesh white, with a radiated circle of very fine red next the stone, from which it separates, of high flavour, melting, juicy, and sweet, relieved by an agreeable acid. Stone small.

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