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Flesh melting, yellowish white, except near the stone, where it is deeply stained with red, which at the apex reaches nearly through to the skin. Juice plentiful, sugary, and of a high vinous flavour. Stone small, deeply rugged. Ripe about the middle of September. This is not only one of the handsomest, but one of the best peaches in our collections, not excepting the Bellegarde, and cannot be too extensively known. The name appears to have originated with the late Mr. Lee of Hammer

smith. 50. SPRING GRove. Hort. Trans. Vol. ii. p.214. Pom. Mag. t. 97. Leaves crenate, with globose glands. Flowers large, pale blush. Fruit middle-sized, globular, broadest at the base, with a very shallow suture. Skin greenish yellow next the wall, but of a bright crimson on the sunny side. Flesh greenish yellow to the stone, from which it separates. Juice plentiful, rich, and highflavoured. Stone rather large, obovate, pointed. Ripe about the end of August. This peach was raised by Mr. Knight of Downton Castle, from a stone of Neil's Early Purple, and the pollen of the Red Nutmeg. It differs from its female parent in being a much rounder fruit. 51. SUPERB Roy AL. Forsyth, Ed. 3. 37. G. Linds. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 544. Royal Sovereign. Nurs. Catalogues. Leaves crenate, with globose glands. Flowers large, deep rose. Fruit middle-sized, somewhat globular, but a little narrowed at the apex, and a little more full on one side of the suture, than on the other. Skin pale greenish yellow next the wall, sprinkled with numerous red dots, but of a rather dull red, and marbled with a deeper colour on the sunny side. Flesh melting, pale greenish yellow, but tinged with red next the stone,

from which it separates. Juice plentiful, rich, and high-flavoured. Ripe the beginning of September. It is probable this peach may be sold under other names in the nurseries. Two trees were planted against a south wall in Mr. Lee's private garden at HammerSmith, under the above name, which proved to be one. and the same fruit. 52. Tito N DE VENUs. Hitt, p.323. Miller, 24. Duhamel, p. 32. t. 23. Bon Jard. 1827. p. 278, Jard. Fruitier, t. 22. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 546. Leaves deeply crenate, with globose glands, and somewhat puckered on each side of the midrib. Flowers small, pale rose, edged with carmine. Fruit large, a little more long than broad, divided by a wide and deep suture, extending from the base to the apex, where it is terminated by a broad, prominent, obtuse nipple, and having a wide cavity at the base. Skin pale greenish yellow next the wall; but of a lively red, and marbled with a deeper colour, on the sunny side. Flesh melting, greenish yellow, but red at the stone, from which it separates. Juice sugary, and of an excellent flavour. Ripe the end of September. I have examined the leaves of many trees of this kind in the nurseries in the Duke of Devonshire's garden, and also in the Horticultural Garden at Chiswick; and I have uniformly found them to be more deeply and more acutely crenate than those on any other glandular-leaved variety.

SECT. III. — Pavies, or Clingstones.

53. BRADDIck’s AMERICAN. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 553. Braddick's North American. Ib. American Clingstone. Nurs. Catalogues. T

Leaves crenate, with globose glands. Flowers small, pale blush. Fruit middle sized, somewhat narrower at

, the apex than at the base, with a considerable fulness

on one side of the suture, which is rather deeply marked. Skin pale yellow, tinged with red on the sunny side. Flesh pale yellow, quite to the stone, to which it firmly adheres. Juice plentiful, pretty good. Ripe the middle of September. This is not Braddick’s American Peach of the Hort. Trans. Vol. ii. p. 205. t. 18., which appears to be a melting peach. Some description ought to have accompanied that plate. 54. CATHARINE. Langley, Pom. t.33. f.6. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 549. Pom. Mag. t. 9. Leaves crenate, with reniform glands, narrower than in many others, and puckered on each side of the midrib. Flowers small, reddish. Fruit above the middle size, rather more long than broad, generally more swelled on one side of the suture than on the other, and terminated by a small nipple, very uneven at the base. Skin pale yellowish green on the side next the wall, and thickly sprinkled with red dots; but on the sunny side it is of a beautiful red, marked and streaked with a darker colour. Flesh firm, yellowish white, but very red at the stone, to which it closely adheres. Juice plentiful, and, if thoroughly ripened, in a fine warm season it is richly flavoured. Stone middle-sized, roundish oval, very slightly pointed. Ripe the end of September and beginning of October. The Catherine Peach ripened at Twickenham, in 1727, on a south wall, September 15th, O.S., or September 26th, N. S. Langley. This tree should always be planted against a south wall, in order to give it every advantage in ripening; and, to be eaten in perfection, it should have been gathered a few days. There is no doubt as to this being an English peach; but it appears from an old catalogue of the Chartreux Garden, that it was long since sent to France under the name of La Belle Catherine, although no trace of it is to be found in the great French works on Pomology. 55. INcoMPARABLE. Aiton’s Epitome. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 549. Pavie Admirable. Ib. 553. Leaves crenate, with reniform glands. Flowers small, pale. Fruit large, of a roundish figure, swelling a little more on one side of the suture than on the other. Skin pale yellow next the wall; but of a pale red, shaded with light scarlet or deep crimson, on the sunny side. Flesh pale yellow, but red at the stone, to which it closely adheres. Juice sugary, and well flavoured. Stone roundish, and almost smooth. Ripe the end of September and beginning of October. The Pavie Admirable is now, for the first time, made a synonyme of the Incomparable, the latter having been established in Mr. Aiton's Epitome. The name of Pavie Admirable is no where to be found, I believe, previously to its insertion in my Plan of an Orchard, published in 1796, whence it was copied into Mr. Forsyth's book, in 1802. 56. MonstroUs PAVIE of Pom Pon NE. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 546. Monstrous Pavy of Pomponne. Miller, No. 29. Pavie Rouge de Pomponne. Duhamel, p. 35. t. 26. Pavie de Pomponne. Lelieur. Pavie Cornu, Pavie Rouge, }* Vol. ii. p. 37. Pavie Monstrueux, Gros Mélecoton, Gros Persique Rouge, }Bon Jard. 1827. p. 279. Leaves crenate, with reniform glands. Flowers large, and crumpled at their margins. Fruit very large, sometimes measuring fourteen inches in circumference, somewhat oval, with a well defined suture extending from the base to the apex, which narrowed, and terminates with an obtuse nipple. Skin yellowish white next the wall; but on the exposed side of a deep intense red, a lighter part of which reaches nearly round the fruit. Flesh firm, yellowish white, but very red at the stone, to which it closely adheres. Stone small in proportion to the size of the fruit. Ripe in a warm and dry season the middle or towards the end of October, when the flavour is pretty good; but in cold seasons it will not ripen abroad in this country. DUHAMEL says, they have in France “a Red Pavie, but which differs so little from the preceding one, that it can scarcely be considered as a variety; nevertheless it ripens earlier, and is not so large. It is flattened at the apex, where the extremity of the suture forms a hollow, no nipple being perceptible. It is very round at the stalk, which is placed in an oval hollow, not very wide, but very deep.” The colour appears to be similar to the other, and probably no real difference exists when both are budded upon the same sort of stock, and grown upon the same wall. This, in all cases, is the only certain test, and on which reliance can be safely placed. 57. OLD NEwingtoN. Langley, Pom. t. 31. f. 1. Miller, No. 20. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trams. Vol. v. p. 538. Newington. Parkinson, No. 8. Leaves doubly serrated, without glands. Flowers large, pale rose. Fruit large, somewhat globular. Skin pale yellowish white on the side next the wall, but of a beautiful red marbled with dashes and streaks of a deeper colour where fully exposed to the sun. Plesh yellowish white, but very red at the stone, to

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