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whitish; but deeply rayed with red next the stone, from which it separates very freely. Juice plentiful, rich, and high-flavoured. Stone oval, pointed, and very rugged. Ripe the end of September. This is an American Peach of great merit, lately introduced into this country. As it ripens late, it requires to be planted against a. south wall, and care must be taken that it is perfectly ripe before being gathered. 42. PURPLE ALBERGE. Langley, p. 104. t. 30. fig. 5. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 546. Miller, No. 18. Red Alberge. Ib. Alberge Jaune. Duhamel, 5. t. 5. Pêche Jaune. Ib. Leaves crenate, with globose glands, Flowers small, bright pale crimson. Fruit middle-sized, nearly globular, having a pretty deep suture extending from the base to the apex. Stalk inserted in a rather deep cavity. Skin yellow next the wall; but on the sunny side of a deep red or purple colour, which extends nearly round the fruit. Flesh deep yellow, but of a soft red next the stone, from which it separates. Juice plentiful and highly flavoured. Ripe the beginning of September. The Purple Alberge ripened at Twickenham, in 1727, on an east wall, August 3. O. S., or August 14. N. S. A very neat and hardy little peach, well deserving of cultivation. It has for several years ripened perfectly well upon an open standard in the front of Mr. Kirke's house, in his nursery at Brompton. Hort. Trans. Vol. iv. p. 518. MILLER has made his Purple or Red Alberge a synonym of the Rossanna, which, however, does not belong to the same Division ; the great similarity be. tween the two fruits has led many gardeners to confound them. The advantage of a sinoptical arrangement of these fruits, in which the glands are made a foundation of the Divisions, is clearly manifest; for, without consulting the simple character, the difference between the Alberge and the Rossanna would, even now, have been left in a state of uncertainty. 43. RAMBOUILLET. Langley, t. 33. f. 3. Miller, No. 21. Rambullion. Ib. Leaves crenate. Flowers large. Fruit middle-sized, rather more long than broad, and divided by a deep suture. Skin pale yellow next the wall, but of a fine red colour on the sunny side. Flesh bright yellow, but deep red at the stone, from which it separates. Juice rich, of a vinous flavour. Ripe the middle of September. This peach appears not to be known by any of our modern cultivators; yet, should it fall in their way, the above description, although defective, will enable them to distinguish it from any other sort. 44. RED MAGDALEN. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 542. Aiton's Epitome. Leaves doubly serrated, without glands. Flowers small, dark dull red. Fruit middle-sized, rather more broad than long. Suture deep, extending nearly half an inch beyond the centre of the apex; swelled much more on one side of it than on the other, and having a wide cavity at the base. Skin pale yellowish white next the wall, but of a very deep red, interspersed with a few ash-coloured and dark specks on the sunny side. Flesh melting and white, but red at the stone, from which it separates. Juice plentiful, and of a very good flavour. Stone oblong and thick. Ripe the beginning of September.

This is a good peach, but apt to be mildewed when planted upon a cold soil.

I have not quoted any synonyms under this head; for, although it may have been sold under different names by different nurserymen, it does not follow that these names should be considered as synonymous.

45. Ross ANNA. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 551. Miller, No. 18.

Rossanne. Duhamel, No. 6.

Alberge Jaune. Bon. Jard. 1827, p. 277.

Pêche Jaune. Ib.

St. Laurent Jaune. Ib.

Petite Roussanne. Ib.

Leaves cremate, with reniform glands. Flowers small, pale dull red. Fruit middle-sized, something larger than the Purple Alberge, and generally a little more flattened ; but it has a similar suture, extending to the apex, where is implanted a small sharp pointed nipple. Skin yellow next the wall, but on the sunny side of a deep red or purple colour, which extends nearly round the fruit. Flesh deep yellow, but red at the stone, from which it separates. Juice plentiful, and of a good flavour.

Ripe about the middle of September.

The glands on the leaves form an unerring character, and, indeed, the only one by which this peach and the Purple Alberge can be distinguished. Had DUHAMEL been aware of the importance of this character, his Traité des Arbres Fruitiers, as far as regards Peaches and Nectarines, would have been invaluable, and the discrepancies between him and modern authors avoided. In the Bon Jardinier, the Roussanne and Alberge Jaune are made the same ; but that they are distinct the glands are evidence; and that the Purple Alberge, and the Rossanna, described by me, are those intended by DUHAMEL, is clear, not only from his description of both, but by his Ordre de Maturité. 46. Roy AL GEorge. Miller, Ed. 2. No. 14. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 542. Pom. Mag. t. 119. Leaves doubly serrated, without glands. Flowers small. Fruit above the middle size, nearly globular. Suture deep, especially at the apex, where it extends almost two thirds across. Skin of a yellowish white next the wall, sprinkled with numerous red dots; but of a deep red, and slightly marbled with a deeper colour on the side next the sun. Flesh melting, yellowish white, but very red at the stone, from which it separates. Juice plentiful, rich, and high-flavoured. Stone ovate, slightly furrowed. Ripe about the middle of September. There is very little doubt but that this is the Royal George of both HITT and MILLER, although evidently not the Royal George of SwitzER, and may therefore be considered as the original Royal George. It is a most excellent peach, and a very beautiful figure of it is given in the Pomological Magazine. There are, it is true, several peaches sold in the nurseries under this name; but this is the sort most generally allowed the right one. 47. Roy AL GEoRGE MIGNONNE. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 542. Leaves doubly serrated, without glands. Flowers small, dark dull red. Fruit middle-sized, a little ovate, mostly narrowed at the apex, and terminated by a small nipple. Skin pale yellowish white, sprinkled with numerous red dots next the wall; but of a very bright red, and marbled with a deeper colour, on the sunny side. Flesh yellowish white, but of a pale red at the stone, from which it separates. Juice sugary and rich. Ripe the beginning and middle of September.

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This very handsome Peach has been sold by Mr. Ronalds, of Brentford, who informs me it was raised from seed by a friend of his, but when and where he did not mention. 48. Roy AL KENSINGTON. Forsyth, Ed. 3. No. 7. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 544. Leaves crenate, with globose glands. Flowers large, pale rose. Fruit middle-sized, somewhat flattened at the apex, and swelled a little more on one side of the suture than on the other. Skin pale greenish yellow next the wall, sprinkled with numerous red dots, but of a fine dark red, and marbled with a deeper colour on the sunny side. Flesh pale greenish yellow, with a few red streaks near the stone, from which it separates. Juice rich, and of a very highly vinous flavour. Ripe the end of August and beginning of September. The name of this very beautiful and excellent Peach originated with Mr. Forsyth. He says it was sent from France to her Majesty Queen Charlotte, about the year 1783, and planted in the Royal Gardens at Kensington, where he found it in 1784, and mentioned in the catalogue of the gardens as a new Peach from France. This tree was planted next to what was then called Grimwood's Royal George, with which its characters, as respects its flowers and leaves, corresponded. It bears a strong resemblance to this (the Grosse Mignonne), but it appears to me to be a smaller fruit, and certainly in its propagation I have found it the most hardy of the two. 49. SMooth-LEAVED Roy AL GEoRGE. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 544. Forsyth. Leaves crenate, with globose glands. Flowers large, fine deep rose. Fruit" above the middle size, nearly globular, but a little depressed at the apex, and the suture almost obscure. Skin yellowish white next the wall, sprinkled with numerous minute red dots, but of a beautiful red or carmine colour on the sunny side.

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