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been called the Early Admirable in the time of Miller, a name which cannot now be abandoned, because we have another peach called the Late Admirable. M. NoiseTTE, in the Bon. Jard., makes his Belle de Vitry a synonym of it; but in this he is not sanctioned by Duhamel, who has always been considered as of unquestionable authority. 25. EARLY WINEYARD. Aiton’s Epitome. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 543. Leaves cremate, with globose glands. Flowers large, pale rose. Fruit middle sized, somewhat globular, and a little depressed at the apex, swelled a little more on one side of the suture than on the other, and very hollow at the base. Skin yellowish white next the wall, and sprinkled with red dots; but of a dull red, and marked with a deeper colour on the sunny side. Flesh yellowish white, except at the stone, where it is tinged with red, and from which it separates. Juice sugary, very rich, and high flavoured. Ripe the end of August or the beginning of September. The name of this peach originated with the late Mr. Lee of Hammersmith, whose nursery, at the early part of its establishment by his father, was called the Vineyard. It has somewhat the appearance of the Grosse Mignonne, but it is not so large nor of so dark a colour, and Mr. Lee assured me it always ripened on his wall a week or ten days earlier: had the two peaches been alike, it could not have escaped the notice of that very distinguished cultivator. For this reason, and from my own observation, I have determined not to abandon the name to a mere synonym. On the other hand, I am quite satisfied that plants may be purchased from murseries, under this name, that may prove to be the Grosse Mignonne. S

26. GEoRGE THE FourTH. Hort. Trans. Vol. vi. p. 413. Pom. Mag. t. 105.

Leaves large, acutely crenate, with globose glands. Flowers small, dull red. Fruit middle-sized, globular, deeply lobed at the summit, with a deep cavity for the footstalks, projecting more on one side of the suture than on the other. Skin moderately downy, of a uniform dark red next the sun, and of a fine pale yellow on the shaded part, mottled with bright red at the junction of the two colours. Flesh pale yellow, rayed with red at the stone, from which it parts freely. Stone very small, bluntly oval, not particularly rugged. Flavour good when upon an open wall, excellent when forced. It is said in the Pom. Mag, to be between a Clingstone and a Melter.

Ripe about the middle of September.

An American variety of considerable importance, not so much for its good quality as a hardy kind, as for being a forcing peach of great merit.

Mr. Michael Floy, of New York, in his letter of November 5, 1823, says, “This is one of the finest peaches I have seen, and the richest I have tasted: it originated in the garden of Mr. Gill, in Broad Street, in this city. This is the second year of its fruiting. The original tree is remarkable thrifty and bore a very full crop this season.”

27. GRossE MIGNONNE. Duhamel, 14. t. 10. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 543.

Mignonne. Ib.

Veloutée de Merlet. Ib.

Grimwood's Royal George. Hooker’s Pom. Lond. 41.

- *c Ns o New Royal George, of the English I'en C ignonne, Nurseries.

Large French Mignonne,

Vinense. Lelieur. Leaves crenate, with globose glands. Flowers large,

deep rose. Fruit large, depressed, hollowed at the
summit, with a moderately deep suture, and swelled
considerably on one of its sides, and a wide cavity at
the base; the side marked by the suture is shorter than
the opposite one. Skin rather thinly clad with down,
of a rich, very deep red, next the sun, thickly mottled
on a yellowish ground next the wall. Flesh pale yellow,
rayed with red at the stone, from which it freely sepa-
rates; melting, juicy, with a rich vinous flavour. Stone
small for the size of the fruit, ovate, very rugged.
Ripe the beginning and middle of September. The
synonyms above quoted may be safely relied upon as
belonging to the Grosse Mignonne of Miller, Duhamel,
and Noisette. The figure in Duhamel is a perfect re-
presentation of the fruit.
The name of Grimwood's Royal George was given
by MR. GRIM wood, to plants which he propagated
from the Grosse Mignonne, in the early part of the
reign of George the Third; by which he derived a
profit beyond what he would have done had he sold
them under what he knew to be their proper name.
See Hooker's Pomona, t. 41. It is said the name of
Mignonne originated with one of the kings of France,
on account of its excellence. -
38. HEMSKIRKE. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 69.
Hemskirk. Langley’s Pom. t. 31. f. 4. G. Lindl.
in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 539.
Leaves doubly serrated, without glands. Flowers
large, fine pale rose. Fruit below the middle size,
more broad than long, but somewhat narrowed at the
apex. Skin greenish yellow, with numerous red dots,
and pearl-coloured specks interspersed; but next the
sun of a bright red, and marbled with a deeper colour.
Flesh melting, of a greenish yellow quite to the stone,
from which it separates. Juice plentiful, sugary and
vinous. Stone small, almost round, and nearly smooth.

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Ripe the end of August and beginning of September. A very beautiful early fruit, from the Royal Gardens at Kensington some years ago. 29. LATE ADMIRABLE. Langley, p. 106. t. 32. f. 5. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 545. Royale. Duhamel, 33. t. 24. Jard. Fruit. t. 23. Bon. Jard. 1827. p. 278. Royal. Pom. Mag. t. 73. Miller. 7. Leaves crenate, with globose glands. Flowers small, pale red. Fruit large, 10 or 11 inches in circumference, of a roundish figure, rather inclining to oval. Suture deep, having the flesh swelled boldly and equally on both sides, with a slight depression on the summit, where there is usually a small, pointed nipple. Skin pale green or yellowish next the wall; but of a pale red, marbled and streaked with darker shades on the sunny side, cavity of the base rather small. Flesh delicate, melting, of a greenish white, but red at the stone, from which it separates. Juice plentiful, and, in a warm season, highly flavoured. Ripe the end of September. The Late Admirable Peach ripened at Twickenham, in 1727, on a south wall, August, 24. O.S.; or September 4. N. S. Langley. This is a most excellent and extremely hardy peach, well deserving of cultivation. It ought invariably to be planted against either a south or south-east wall, as on colder aspects there is little chance of growing it in perfection. M. BUTRET, a French writer, it seems, has been alluded to, as authority for considering this peach, the Bourdine, and Téton de l'énus, as absolutely one and the same fruit, declaring the pretended differences between them are only “un charlatanisme des pépiniéristes.” If by this he means to allude to his own countrymen, I have nothing further to say, than that an illiberal idea does not usually arise in a liberal mind. I must leave it to M. NoiseTTE, who is now living, to defend himself in the publication of the Bon Jardinier and Jardinier Fruitier, in which he has to the present day kept them distinct. DUHAMEL I need not, on this point mention again. To writers of our own country, I would suggest the propriety of their trying to propagate any two or three sorts of peaches, which they may consider alike, upon the Muscle stock, and ascertain the result, before they declare them to be absolutely one and the same fruit. 30. LockyER’s MIGNoNNE. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. 5. p. 542. Lockyer's Peach. Forsyth, Ed. 3. No. 40. Leaves doubly serrated, without glands. Flowers small. Fruit middle-sized, nearly globular. Skin greenish yellow next the wall, sprinkled with numerous red dots; but of a dull red, and marbled with a darker colour on the sunny side. Flesh greenish yellow, slightly coloured with red next the stone, from which it separates. Juice plentiful and good in flavour. Ripe the middle of September. 31. LoRD FAUco NBERG’s MIGNONNE. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 542. Lord Falconbridge's. Hanbury. Leaves doubly serrated, without glands. Flowers small. Fruit above the middle size, somewhat ovate, being broader at the base than at the apex. Suture rather deep. Skin pale yellow next the wall, sprinkled with numerous red dots; but of a dull red, marked with several broad spots or patches of a deeper colour on the sunny side. Flesh yellowish white, but red at the stone, from which it separates. Juice plentiful and rich. Stone rather flat. Ripe the middle of September. This very fine and handsome Peach has been many

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