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15. SULHAMSTEAD. Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 513. Leaves deeply serrated, without glands. Flowers large. Fruit large, somewhat globular, depressed at the apex, slightly cleft, with a corresponding depression on the opposite side. Skin covered with a fine short down, of a clear pale yellow next the wall; but of a pale red, and marbled with a darker colour on the sunny side. Flesh melting, pale yellow quite to the stone, from which it separates. Juice abundant, sweet, with a rich vinous flavour. Ripe the beginning and middle of September. This fine Peach, somewhat resembling, extermally, a Newington, was raised in the garden of Mrs. Thoytes, of Sulhamstead House, near Reading, in Berkshire, and was first exhibited at the Horticultural Society in 1819. 16. VANGUARD. G. Lindl, Plan of an Orchard, 1796. ib. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 540. : Leaves doubly serrated, without glands. Flowers large. Fruit large, nearly globular, and quite flat or depressed at the apex. Skin yellowish white next the wall, but marbled and streaked with a few dashes of much deeper colour on the sunny side. Flesh melting, and white to the stone, from which it separates. Juice rich and sugary. Stone somewhat ovate, rugged, and sharp pointed. Ripe the beginning of September. - It would be difficult, perhaps, to ascertain with whom the Vanguard Peach originated, or when it began to be first cultivated. I found it in Mr. Mackie's Nursery, at Norwich in 1789, and I inserted it in a list of Peaches, in my Plan of an Orchard, published in 1796, whence it found its way into Mr. Forsyth's Treatise on Fruit Trees, in 1802; but neither in that work, nor yet in any other, has any description of it, I believe, been hitherto published. Mr. Hooker, in his Pomona Londinensis, has given a tolerably good figure of it, under the name of Noblesse, which he had intended to

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represent, but from which it widely differs, as has been noticed under that head. 17. WHITE MAGDALEN. Miller, No. 5. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 540. Madeleine Blanche. Duhamel. 8. t. 6. Montagne Blanche. Knoop. Fruct. p. 79. Leaves doubly serrated, without glands. Flowers large, pale rose. Fruit below the middle size, somewhat globular, rather more broad than long, having a deeply marked suture, which extends from the base to the apex, where it is terminated by a small, slightly sunk nipple, and having a rather wide cavity at the base. Skin yellowish white next the wall, but on the sunny side tinged with red, and marbled with a deeper red colour. Flesh melting, of a yellowish white, with a slight tinge of red next the stone, from which it separates. Juice plentiful, but not of any high flavour. Stone small, obtuse, a little rugged. Ripe about the middle of August. Miller observes, that the pith of the young branches of this Peach is black: this can be only accidental, as happens also with others. 18. WHITE NUTMEG. Miller, No. 1. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 540. Avant Pêche blanche. Duhamel, No. 1. t. 1. Leaves small, doubly serrated, without glands. Flowers large, very pale blush. Fruit very small, the least of all the varieties, a little more long than broad, having a very conspicuous deeply marked suture, extending to the apex, on one side of which it oblongates into a very small acute nipple. Skin white, but when fully exposed it has a very pale blush tinge. Flesh white to the stone, from which it separates. Juice very sweet, of a musky and very agreeable flavour. Stone small, oval, mucurate, very slightly rugged. Ripe the middle of J uly. This very delicate Peach has not been successfully

s

cultivated in this country. I have never met with it in any part of England.

SECT. II. — Melting red or purple fruited.

19. Acton Scot. Hort. Trans. Vol. ii. p. 140. t. 10. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 552. Leaves crenate, with globose glands. Flowers large, pale rose. Fruit rather small, or below the middle size, somewhat narrowed at the apex, where it is usually very much depressed. Suture shallow, on one side of which it is fuller than on the other. Skin rather woolly, pale yellow, of a bright red on the sunny side, and marbled with a deeper colour. Flesh melting, yellowishwhite to the stone, from which it separates. Juice sugary, with a slight bitter, but flavour pretty good. Ripe the end of August and beginning of September. This was raised by Mr. Knight, of Downton Castle; the offspring of the Noblesse, impregnated with the Red Nutmeg, and was exhibited for the first time at the Horticultural Society in 1814. 20. BELLEGARDE. Duhamel. 28. t. 20. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 545. Pom. Mag. t. 26.

Galande. according to the Pom. Mag. of the Early Galande. } English Nurseries.

Violette Hàtive.

Noire de Montreuil, of the French Nurseries.

Leaves cremate, with globose glands. Flowers small, bright reddish pink. Fruit pretty large, globular, of a very regular figure, with a shallow suture, and a slightly hollowed apex, with a little projecting point in its centre. Skin, on the exposed side, rich deep red, with dark purple or violet streaks; on the shaded side, pale green faintly tinged with yellow, Flesh pale yellow, slightly rayed with red at the stone, very melting, juicy, and

rich, and from which it separates. Stone rather large, slightly pointed. 21. BARRINGTON. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 548. Pom. Mag. t. 147. Buckingham Mignonne, according to the Pom. Mag. Fruit rather large and handsome, roundish, somewhat elongated, and rather pointed at the summit. Suture moderately deep along one side. Skin pale yellowish green next the wall, deep red next the sun, marbled with a darker colour. Flesh yellowish white, slightly rayed with crimson tints next the stone, from which it parts freely ; melting, juicy, and very rich. Stone middle sized, ovate, with a lengthened sharp point, very rugged, and of a dark brown colour. Ripe the middle and latter end of September. This very handsome and valuable Peach was raised above twenty years ago by a Mr. Barrington, of Burwood, in Surrey. I purchased it some years ago from the late Mr. Lee, of Hammersmith, under the name of Buckingham Mignonne. 22. CHANCELLoR. Miller, No. 14. Pom. Mag. t. 61. G. Lind, in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 550. Chancellière. Duhamel, Vol. ii. p. 24. Leaves crenate, with reniform glands. Flowers small, reddish. Fruit large, oval, with a very distinct suture, having a rather small cavity at the base. Skin not very downy, dark crimson next the sun, pale yellow next the wall, finely mottled towards the union of the two colours. Flesh pale yellow, but of a very deep red next the stone, from which it separates. Juice rich, and of a vinous flavour. Stone oblong, tapering to the base, and pointed at the summit. Ripe the middle of September. This is not the l’éritable Chancellière of Duhamel, which has large flowers, and must be considered as the true Chancellor; but appears to be mentioned by him at the conclusion of his description of that fruit. The Chancellor Peach is said to have been raised from a seed of the Chevreux, in the garden of M. de Seguier, Chancellor of France. 23. Double Swalls H. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 550. Swalze or Swolze. Langley, p. 105. t. 32. fig. 1. Leaves crenate, with reniform glands. Flowers small, dark red. Fruit middle sized, somewhat ovate, and mostly terminated by a small nipple. Suture deep, on one side of which it is considerably more swelled than on the other. Skin pale yellow next the wall, but of a bright and deep red on the sunny side. Flesh soft, melting and white, but pale red at the stone, from which it separates. Juice plentiful and well flavoured. Ripe the beginning and middle of September. This Peach ripened at Twickenham, in 1727, on a west wall, August 1st, O.S., or August 12th, N. S. — Langley. Langley says, the Double Swalsh Peach was brought into England by Lord Peterborough before 1729. 24. EARLY ADMIRABLE. Langley, p. 103. t. 30. fig. 2. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 545. Admirable. Duhamel, 29. t. 21. Miller, No. 19. Belle de Vitry. Bon. Jard. 1827. p. 277. Leaves crenate, with globose glands. Flowers middlesized, pale red. Fruit above the middle size, somewhat globular. Skin yellowish white next the wall, but of a beautiful red on the side next the sun. Flesh white, but red at the stone, from which it separates. Juice plentiful, vinous, and well flavoured. Ripe the middle of September. The Early Admirable Peach ripened at Twickenham, in 1727, on a south-east wall, August 8d, O.S., or

August 14th, N. S. Langley.
This Peach, although by no means an early one, has

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