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to the stone, from which it separates. Juice a little musky, but saccharine, and well flavoured. Ripe the middle of August. This peach ripened at Twickenham in 1727, on an east wall, July 10. O. S. or July 21. N. S.— Langley. It is said to have derived its name from the celebrated Anne Dunch, of Pudsey, in Berkshire. It is sold in some nurseries under the name of J77 ite Avant. 7. EARLY Downton. Hort. Trans. Vol. ii. p. 217. Leaves crenate, with globose glands. Flowers large, pale rose. Fruit rather small, narrowed at the apex, which is generally terminated by a small acute nipple; very hollow at the base. Skin pale yellowish white, sprinkled with red dots; but of a bright red on the sunny side. Flesh yellowish white to the stone, from which it separates. Juice rich, with a good flavour. Ripe the end of August and beginning of September. This beautiful little peach was raised by Mr. Knight, of Downton Castle, who sent an account of it, with two others, to the Horticultural Society, Aug. 21. 1815. 8. FLAT PEACH of CHINA. Hort. Trams. Vol. iv. p. 512. t. 19. G. Lind, in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 549. Java Peach. Ib. Leaves crenate, with reniform glands. Flowers large. The Fruit of this most singular peach is flatted, and completely concave at both the apex and the stalk. It is about two inches and a half in diameter, and scarcely three quarters of an inch thick, through the eye to the stalk, which thickness consists only of the stone and skin. The crown of the fruit looks like a broad and rather hollow eye, of an irregular five-angled shape, surrounded by the appearance of the remains of the segments of a calyx; the whole surface of this eye is roughly marked with small irregular warted lines, like

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the crown of a Medlar. The colour of the Skin is pale yellow, mottled or speckled with red on the part exposed to the sun. Flesh pale yellow, having a beautiful radiated circle of red surrounding the stone, and extending far into the fruit. The consistence and flavour of the flesh is that of a good melting peach, being sweet and juicy, with a little noyeau flavour. It first ripened its fruit in this country at Thames Ditton, and was sent to the Horticultural Society by John Braddick, Esq., in 1819. Hort. Trans. Vol. iv. p. 512. 9. Ford's SEEDLING. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 539. Leaves doubly serrated, without glands. Flourers large, of a beautiful pale rose colour. Fruit middle sized, a little narrowed at the apex, and having a slight suture. Skin yellowish green, marbled with bright red on the sunny side. Flesh yellowish green, quite to the stone, from which it separates. Juice plentiful, of a rich poignant flavour. Ripe the middle of September. 10. MALTA. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 539. Pom. Mag. t. 15. Pêche Malte. Duhamel, No. 15. Pêche de Malte. Lelieur. Malte de Normandie. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 91. Belle de Paris. Bon. Jard. 1827. p. 276. Italian Peach. Miller, No. 12. According to the Pom. Mag. Leaves doubly serrated, without glands. Flowers large, pale. Fruit middle sized, generally depressed at the apex, with a broad shallow suture on one side, and slight traces of one on the other. Skin, on the shaded side, pale dull greenish yellow ; next the sun, broadly marked with broken blotches of dull purplish red. Flesh greenish yellow, with a slight stain of purple next the stone, from which it separates. Juice plentiful, very rich, with an extremely agreeable vinous flavour. Stone middle sized, oval, pointed, rather rugged. Ripe the end of August and beginning of September. A very excellent and hardy peach, said to ripen its fruit well on an open standard in Normandy. It bears carriage remarkably well, and will keep longer when gathered than any other peach, except the clingstones. 11. NEw Nobless E. Nursery Catalogues. Leaves doubly serrated, without glands. Flowers large, pale rose. Fruit middle-sized, somewhat oval, with an obscure suture, quite even at the apex, but terminating with a small acute nipple. Skin pale greenish yellow on the shaded side; but next the sun of a pale red, and marbled with different shades of deeper colour. Flesh greenish yellow quite to the stone, from which it separates. Juice plentiful, rich, and of a most exquisite flavour. Ripe the beginning of September. This Peach has been sold for some time by Mr. Ronalds of Brentford, who says it was raised by a friend of his from seed; but when and where I have not been informed.

12. NoblessE. Langley, p. 101. t. 28. fig. 3. G. Lindl.

in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 539. Pom. Mag. t. 95. and of all English JPriters beginning with Switzer, in 1724. Mellish's Favourite. Of the Nurseries. Leaves doubly serrated, without glands. Flowers large, pale blush. Fruit large, for the most part roundish oblong, a little narrowed at the apex, and terminated by an acute nipple. Skin slightly downy, pale yellowish green next the wall ; but of a marbled dull red, marked with broken streaks and blotches of a darker colour on the sunny side. Flesh melting, pale yellowish white to the stone, from which it separates. Juice plentiful, rich, and highly flavoured. Stone large, obovate, pointed. Ripe the end of August and beginning of September. The Noblesse Peach ripened at Twickenham, in 1727, on a south wall, July 20th, O.S., or Aug. 31st, N. S. Langley. This is one of our very best hardy peaches, and perhaps one of the most common; but it is often confounded with another, well known, the Vanguard, which is somewhat similar in appearance and in its general characters. It is, however, distinguished by its fruit being, for the most part, oblong, narrowed, and plump at the apex, with a pointed nipple: in the Vanguard the fruit is equally large, or even more so, always globular, rather than oblong, and its crown or apex flat and often depressed. Nurserymen need not to be at any loss to distinguish the two sorts when maiden plants in the nursery; the lateral shoots of the Noblesse being nearly as long as the main leader; those of the Vanguard being

less numerous, and exceeded considerably by the main

shoot; besides, the plants of the Vanguard are of a taller growth than those of the Noblesse. Indeed, so obvious and invariable have I found these characters, that should the two kinds become inadvertently intermixed in the nursery rows, the most inexperienced foreman would be enabled to separate them, without any fear of mistake. In the Hort. Trans. above quoted, I stated that Mellish's Favourite and the Noblesse were the same. I have this year again been favoured by Mrs. Gurdon, of Letton, with specimens of both, and I find them identically one and the same. 13. OLD Roy AL CHARLoTTE. G. Linds. in Horf. Trans. Vol. v. p. 540. Leaves doubly serrated, without glands. Flowers large, pale blush. Fruit middle-sized, nearly globular,

but a little narrowed at the apex, where it is generally terminated by a small nipple. Skin pale greenish yellow next the wall; but tinged with blush, and marbled with a deeper colour on the sunny side. Flesh soft, melting, and white to the stone, from which it separates. Juice sugary and vinous. Stone obtuse, a little rugged. Ripe the middle and end of August. This is undoubtedly the first Royal Charlotte ever known in our gardens. It was first sold by Robert Lowe, a nurseryman at Hampton Wick, about the year 1760. It has much the appearance of a Noblesse, but is smaller, and on the same aspect ripens ten days or a fortnight before it. The specimen from which this description was written, was from a tree growing at Heydon Hall, in Norfolk, in 1792. It had been purchased from Mr. Lowe, and planted there in 1766. 14. RED NUTMEG. Miller, No. 2. G. Lindl. in Hort. Trans. Vol. v. p. 547. Nutmeg. Parkinson, No. 21. Brown Nutmeg. Of some Collections. Avant Pêche rouge. Duhamel, No. 2. t. 3. Leaves small, crenate, with reniform glands. Flowers large. Fruit small, but larger than those of the White Nutmeg, of a somewhat globular figure, having a well marked suture extending from the base to the apex, terminated by a small, round, obtuse nipple. Skin pale yellow next the wall; but of a bright scarlet or vermillion, and slightly marbled with a deeper colour on the sunny side. Flesh yellowish white, but red at the stone, from which it separates. Juice sweet and a little musky. Ripe the end of July. This is the earliest hardy Peach cultivated in this country, and is very good when just ripe, but in a short time it becomes doughy.

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