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to the ladies that you was returned quite unhurt from the Havannah.

Tam. Did that coxcomb betray me? That accounts for all Emily's behaviour-Oh, Major, I am ruined past redemption-I have behaved most extravagantly, both to your lady and Emily. I hall never be able to look them in the face again.

Belf. Ay, ay, I foretaw this. Did not I tell you that you would expofe yourself confoundedly? However, I'll be an advocate for you.my Florival shall be an advocate for you ; and I make no doubt but you will be taken into favour again.

Em. Does he deserte it, Major ?

Belf. Why, Madam, I can't say much for him-or myself either, faith-We must rely entirely on your goodness.

Flo. He's a true penitent, I fee, Madam; and I'll answer for it, he loves you to excess.-Nay, look on him.

Em. Was it well done, Colonel, to cherish a mean diftruft of me? to trifle with the partiality I had shown to you; and to endeavour to give me pain, merely to.. fecure a poor triumph over my weakness to yourself?

Tam. I am ashamed to answer you.
Bell. Afhamed! and so you well may indeed.

Tam. I fee my absurdity-all I wish is to be laughed: at, and forgiven.

Belf. A very reafonable request.--Come, Madam, pity the poor fellow, and admit him to your good gra.. ces again.

Flo. Let us prevail on you, dear Madam...

Em. Well--now. I see. he is inot heartily mortified, 1 half inclined ta pity him.

Tam. Generous Emily!

Bell. Go, you provoking wretch! 'tis more than you » deferve.

[T. Tamper. Tam. It shall be the future ftudy of my life to de-ferve this pardon--[Kifing her hand.)—Belford, I give. you joy-Madam-[to Florival] I have behaved fo ill! to you, I scarce know how to give you joy as I ought.

Belf. Come, come, no more of this at present-Now we have on all sides ratified the preliminaries, let us settle :

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the definitive treaty as foon as we can- -We have been two lucky fellows, Tamper-I have been fortunate in finding my mistress, and you as fortunate in not losing your's.

Tam. So we have, Belford: and I wish every brave officer in his Majesty's service had secured to himself such comfortable winter-quarters as we have, after a glorious campaign.

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PEEP INTO THE SERAGLIO.

IN TWO ACTS.

DRAMATIS PERSONE.

MLN.

Dublin. Edinburgb, 1782. Solyman the Greal, Emperor} Dr Achmet. Mr Williamson.

the Turks, Ofmyn, chicf of the Eunuchs, Mr Wilder. Mr Hollingsworth.

WOMEN.

Miss Scrace. Mrs Mountford. Ifmena,

Mrs Johnson. Miss Kirby, Roxalana, an English Slave, Mrs Daly. Mrs Bulkley.

Elmira,

A C T I. SCENE, An apartment in the Seraglio, a Throne in

manner of a Couch, with a Canopy; on the front of
which is an Escutcheon fixed, with the Ottoman Arnis
crowned with Feathers ; in the Back scene, the Sultan's
Door covered with a Curtain.
Enter Osmyn and ELMIRA.

OSMYN.
ELL me, what right have you to be discon-

tented ? El. When first I came within these walls, I found

mysel £

T tested?

myself a llave; and the thoughts of being shut up for ever here, terrified me to death : my tears flowed incesfantly ; Solyman was moved with them, and folemnly promised to restore me to my liberty, my parents, and my country.

of. And yet when the Sultan agreed to send you back to Georgia, you did not avail yourself of his generosity.

El. True ; but his munificence, and above all the tenderness and love he expressed to me fince, have reconciled me to this place, and I vainly thought my charms could have attach'd him to me.

f. Why then complain? You still poffess his heart. Already you have been twice honour'd with the impe. rial handkerchief.

El. His heart! does not this place contain a hundred beauties who equally share his love? Tell the Sultan I'm determin'd, and ready to accept the first opportunity of returning to my friends and country,

of. I shall procure you an answer this morning But, hark! the Sultan approaches.

[Exit Elmira. [The Curtain is drawn, and the Sultan enters, prece

ded by Mutes, &c. A grand March played. Sul. Osmyn. f. The humblest of your Naves attends.

[Bors to the ground. Sul. My friend, quit this style of servitude; I am

weary of it.

os. And of the seraglio too, Sir ?

Sul. It even is so-and yet, upon reflection, I cannot tell why, unless that, having been accustom’d to the noise of camps and the business of war, I know not how to relish pleasures, which, though varied, appear insipid, through the ease and tranquillity with which they are attained.--Your voice used to charm me.

Osmyn fings.
Behold yonder zephyr how lightly it blows,
And copying of lovers it ne'er seeks repose,
But lies to the pink, to the lily, the rose,

Careffing each flower of the garden and grove.
Then fill let your pleasure variety crown,

*Mongo 'Mongst the different beauties that rove up and down, Court the charms of the fair, of the black, of the brown,

They're the flowers that embellish the garden of love. Sul. I have often told you I am not touch'd with mere carefsing machines, who are taught to love or fear by interest.

Of. And yet your highness must confess, your fervant has neglected nothing perfectly to content, particularly in one object he procur’d you.

Sul. Who is that?
Of. The Circassian beauty—the Sultana Elmira.

Sul. And truly she poffesfes all the charms that can adorn her sex.

Of. You thought so once.
Sul. Once! I think so still.
Of. Indeed !
Sul. Pofitively-why should you doubt it?

Of Your word is my law. But, Sir, there is a mat. ter I must acquaint you with : I cannot manage the feraglio; and, by the beard of Heli, I would rather quit the helm I can no longer guide. That English slave lately brought here is quite ungovernable ; she is sure to do every thing she is forbid; The makes a joke of our threats, and answers our most serious admonitions with a laugh : befides, she is at variance with the rest of the women, and shews them such an example, that I cannot longer rule them. Šul. That is your business— I will have them all agree

-How do you call her ? Of. Since she has been here, we have called her Roxalana.

Sul. Well-you must endeavour to bring her to reafon.

Of. Shall the Sultana Elmira throw herself at your highness's feet then?

Sül. Let her come-And, do you hear, Osmyn, go to the apartment of that Persian Nave you spoke of yesterday, she that fings so well, and send her hither. Of. I will, most sublime Sultan. [Exit Ofmyn.

Enter Almira. She kneels. Sul. I know before-hand that you come to upbraid We have not met so often lately as our mutual

inclinations

me

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