Зображення сторінки
PDF
ePub

220

21

Generic and general terms not really
distinct, 270

ideas, 52, 58, 59, 95
Germ of the sign-making faculty,

128
German philologists' hypothesis as to

speech origin, 283
Gesture and spoken language, 280

and tone, 137

conceptual, 260

effect of on, and effect on from,
spoken language, 140

expressive of idea “time,” 145

not due to speech, 147
Gestures, indicative, of an infant,

H
Habits, power of forming them, 60
Hæcceity, 95
Hales, Dr., 231
Hamilton, Sir William, and signs, 92
Hand of a clock, illustration from, 12
Harlez, Mgr. de, 33
Harmony, craving for feeling of

completion of, 77
Hat taken off, and its significance,

219
“ He" as that one, 245
“He jackety whitey,” 257
Hearth-brush and monkey, 86
Hebrew and expression for being, 251
Hegel, 39, 83, 196
Helena, St., flora of, 113, 118
Help obtained by animals, 133
Herbert Spencer and savages, 231
Herder and language, 281
Higher concepts, 190, 192

inorganic intelligence could dis-
pense with signs and reasoning, 243

natures superposed on lower,
recepts, 189, 190, 192
His-age-thy-father,” 257, 258

“ Hiss

of speechless children, intelli-
gent, 138, 204

rational and irrational, 121

to express abstract ideas, 145
Gesture-conversation of Indians of

different tribes, 139
Gesture-language and aphasia, 138

and Colonel Mallery, 138
and Mr. Tylor, 139
its innate intellectuality, 143
its syntax, 142

would be invented by dumb
rational animals, 163
Gesture-signs by monkeys, 133-135

how meaning put into? 284
Gesture-told tale about apple-tree,
140

about melons, 139
Ghost not needed to show existence,

253
God becoming conscious of Himself
in man, 196

imagined as thought enthroned
somewhere, 166

intellectual brutes, and objec-
tive contradiction, 215
“ God made nothing,” 144
Good-for-eating, idea of, 48
Gorilla and emotional language, 156
Grammatical structure of sentences,

160
Grandchild of Mr. Darwin, 239
Grebo language, 247
Greek verb substantive, 253
Green, Professor, 195
Grotesque mental images, 165
Groups of experiences, 59

of languages, 231
“Grouse” as a proposition, 207
Growth of consciousness, ambiguous

term, 247
Gunpowder men, 217

as an onomatopoetic word,
161
Historical relation of word and sen.

tence, 242
Hobbes, 39, 109, 180
Hollows and thirsty dogs, 75
Homo alalus, 287, 290

sapiens, 237, 287
Homonymy, 110, 116
Hoste, Sir William, and shot monkey,

134
Hottentots, clicks of, 247, 286, 287
House-fly and spider, 87
Houzeau's exaggeration about par-

rots, 154
Huber and queen-bee, 129
Human imperfection necessitates
language and ratiocination, 243

instincts, 20, 25
intellect, its spontaneity, 272
mind and natural genesis, 215

nature proved distinct by ethics,
273
progress, 18

speech and intellect generally
parallel, 230
Humanity, its se code, 138
Hume, 40, 92
Hunting of imaginary pigs after

prayers, 78

Huxley, Prof., on our knowledge of

others' feelings, 22
Hymenoptera, 17
Hypotheses, mechanical ones, useful,

29
Hypothesis, Darwin's, as to speech
origin, 283, 288

mechanical, regarded as abso-
lute truth, 30

Mr. Romanes's, as to speech
origin, 286

of German philologists as to
speech origin, 283

of Noiré, 102, 107, 240, 291

I

Ideas, definition of, 41

general, of plants, 49
- of brutes, 41

of camel and triangle, illustra-
tion from, 43

of good-for-eating, suitable-for-
nutrition, etc., 48, 49

of object, conceptions implied
in them, 45

, power of objectifying them, 182
Ideation, conceptual, 205
Identification of thought and lan-

guage, 102
Identity, meaning of, 105, 114
Idiotic children and Dr. Scott, 137
Ignorant deaf-mute's idea of the Bible,

165
Ignoratia elenchi, 283
“Ilda,” a childish term, 217, 218
Illustration from a cat and a piano,
151

a marsupial mammal, 69
an accoucheur, 281
a sieve, 67
a thunder-clap, 63
a triangle, 43, 54, 128
a weather-cock, 158
bolting a door, 68
chef and dinner, 200
fox and farm-yard, 50
hour-hand of a clock, 12

ideas of camel and triangle,
43

Jove and Minerva's birth,
64

match and candle, 200
musical instruments, 211
printer's ink, 96
Socrates, 180
squirrel's cage, 268
steam-engine, 96
telegraph post, 220
toast, 5

wasp and honey, 128
Illustrations as to continuity, 12
Imaginary pigs hunted after prayers,

78
Imagination of anything unexperi-
enced, impossible, 26, 61

-, scientific, 29
Imaginations, the easiest, tend to be

adopted, 30
Imitation, meaningless, instinctive
and intentional, 159

of sounds by parrots, 155
Imitational acts, 124, 127
Immaterial intelligence would not

need language or reasoning, 243

“I” as signified in various languages,
246

as this one, 245
, importance of the term exagger-
ated, 205
“Idea" as a term used in a broad and

narrow sense, 41
Idea of an object not an amalgam, 45

of being, 70, 145, 176, 249, 271
of being and deaf-mutes, 145

of being and substantive verb,
249

of “being" latent in every con-
cept, 271

of cause and muscular effort,
of equality, 96
of number, what it implies, 81

of self not composed of ideas of
other people, 211

of self not so exceptionally gifted
as supposed, 205

of the Bible by ignorant deaf-
mute, 165
Ideal existence real, 178

- language monosyllabic, 207
Idealism, 37, 194, 195
Ideas, 38, 41

abstract, of ripeness, appear.
ance, detection, direction, and sur-
prise, 142

and feelings, differences between,
45, 46

and sensuous affections, rela-
tions between, 94
as classified by Mr. Romanes, 59
as classified by us, 59

called simple, particular, com-
pound, complex, and mixed, 55,

211

56

Immaterial principles and Mr. Wal-

lace, 27
Immortality, our, knowable without

revelation, 24
Imperfection of our nature necessitates

language and ratiocination, 243
Implication ofexistence in propositions

and concepts, 177, 179
- of notions of truth, etc., 45
Implicit judgments, 175, 217, 242,
243

sign-making, 127
Importance of term “I”exaggerated,

205
Impossibility of ethical judgments in
a brute nature, 273

of imagining origins, 299

of objective contradictions, 215
Impulsional acts, 122, 127
In potentia ad actum et ad esse, 215
Inadequacy of speech produces

metaphor, 233
Inanimate objects and savages, 211
Inarticulate clicks, 247, 287

- irrational sounds, 120
Inclinations to exaggerate, 130, 149
Incredibly absurd tale of a cockatoo,

136
Indians and deaf-mutes, 138

and gesture-language, 138

of different tribes, gesture con-
versation between, 139
Indians' pleasure at meeting deaf-

mutes, 138, 139
Indicative gestures of an infant, 220

signs, 173
Individual percepts, 59
Individuation, principle of, 73
Infant and primitive man, 264, 265
Infant's indicative gestures, 220
Infants and animals, asserted parallels
between, 16

and reason, 214, 222

and savages, their nature judged
by analogy, 8
Inference but a department of reason,
71

-, organic and true distinguished,
63
Infectional language, 231
Inheritance of structure related to

language, 141, 171
Inherited organization and deaf-mutes,

141, 171
Innate faculty of external expression -
of concepts, 232

intellectuality of the deaf and
dumb, 143

Innate tendency to articulate, 172
Inner nature shown by outer acts, 49
Inorganic intelligence need not speak

or reason, 243
Insectivorous plants, 22, 49
Insects, metamorphoses of, 263
Instantaneous actions in nature, 12
Instinct, 60, 61, 211, 250

of language, 161, 163, 232
Instinctive cries, 283
Instincts, human, 20, 25
Instruments, musical, illustration
from, 211

silent, do not sound when col-
lected, 211
Intellect and expression simultaneous
in origin, 236

and speech generally parallel,
23°

apprehends beyond sense, 233
as present potentially, 214, 222
human, its spontaneity, 272

its relation to religion, 26
sacrificed to sense, 299

sensitivity, vitality, chemistry,
and physics, 199

smuggled in, 291
Intellectual action, foundation for,
laid by sensation, 199

acts not necessarily reflex, 125
and sensuous elements exist side
by side in concepts, 271

and unconscious cognition, 65
intuition, 70
language, 121
signs, 126, 127

thimble-rigging, 92
Intellectuality, innate, of the deaf and

dumb, 143
Intelligence, nascent, first apprehends
general characters, 156

of a higher order than ours
might dispense with language and
reasoning, 243

of primitive man, 235
Intelligent conversation

between
Indians and deaf-mutes, 139

gestures made by speechless
children, 138, 204
Intended expressions must be thought,

254
Intention involved in propositions,

179
Intentional putting together not

needed for mental conception, 68,
70

signs, 122, 126
what is really such, 122

Interruptions in nature, 10, 12
Introspection and thought not

identical, 182
Intuitions of first men possibly the

clearest, 231
Invalid cockatoo, absurd tale about,

136

Knowing psychical processes does not

alter their nature, 125
Knowledge, conditions of, 183

known as such, 192

needs direct but not reflex con-
sciousness, 183

of necessary truths, 29
,our, of others' feelings, 22
, receptual, not true knowledge,

subjective, its supposed ejective
origin, 210

without advertence, 66
Koum, Hebrew term, 251
Kurd of the Zara tribe, 275

198

9

Invention higher than association,
160

of arbitrary signs by children,
161
Inverted man and tree, 275
Iron, bronze, and gunpowder men,

217
Irrational actions of animals, 124

- gestures, 121

sounds articulate and inarticu-
late, 120
“ Is," is a term which can be well

understood without being expressed,
180, 249

the concept, 250, 259
Isolated children originating lan.

guages, 231

L

J

Jackdaws, parrots, etc., 150
John Stuart Mill, 180, 191
Johnson, Captain, and shot monkey,

134
Jove and Minerva, 64
Judgment, simplest element of thought,

175, 217, 242, 254
Judgments about a negro, 176

always imply existence, 179

explicit and implicit, 175, 217,
242

monosyllabic ones, 206
of children and adults, 192

K

Labourer of Sussex and intellect, 238
Lacey (a cowherd), his conversation,

238
Lampong language, 246
Language and Bunsen, 251

and Garnett, 252, 253, 280
and Geiger, 99, 253, 278
- and Herder, 281
and Latham, 275

and Max Müller, 235, 245,
246, 248

and primitive man, 33
and Prof. Whitney, 285

and ratiocination due to our
imperfection, 243

and reason, 120
and Schelling, 242
and Sweet, 235, 254
and Waitz, 242
Aryan, 246

beginning of, 241, 243
-, categories of, 121
-, contrary opinions as to survivals,
262

Coptic, 253
Dayak, 257
different groups of, 231

emotional and intellectual, 121
-, explicit and implicit, 127

faculty of, and inherited organi-
zation, 141, 142

Feejee, 257
Grebo, 247
Greek, 253
Hebrew, 251
ideal, monosyllablic, 207
its simplest element, 243
Lampong, 246
Malay, 246

Kama, Hebrew term, 251
Kant, 40, 100, 239
Kawi language, 246
Khăp, 287
Kind, difference of, between recepts

and concepts, 66
Kinds, different, of language, 121
Kleutgen's “Philosophie Scholas.

tique,” 57
Knocking at a door seen by cat, 84
“Know," ambiguity of that term,

154, 198
Knowing and Being," work of Prof.
Veitch, 196

2

Language, metaphorical, 233, 234

of children, 206, 221, 222, 245,
263

of Chinese and children, 245
of gesture, and Colonel Mallery,

Line of least resistance followed, 30

straight, not made up of crooked
lines, 211
Lingua franca, 232
Local presence and existence, 251
Locke, 36, 38, 39, 97
Logic of concepts, 38, 90

of events, 221
of feelings, 71, 165
of recepts, 38, 60, 65, 91, 200,

138

201

of signs, 71
Logos, the, 95, 100, 105, 118
Lord's Prayer, as expressed by deaf-

mutes, 145
Love of the marvellous, and savages,

274
Lower concepts, 96

mental powers (our) shared by
animals, 216

recepts and concepts, 189, 192
Lubbock, Sir John, and ants, 132

and his dogs, 133
Ludicrous, the emotion of, 19

M

126, 127

of gesture, and Mr. Tylor, 139

of gesture, expressing abstract
ideas, 145

of gesture, its innate intellec-
tuality, 143

of gesture, its syntax, 142

of gesture would be invented
by dumb, rational animals, 163

of signs, 232,
or sign-making, schemes of,

originated by isolated children,
231

pictorial and written, 121
Polynesian, 258, 259
rubicon of mind, 262
Sanskrit, 232, 233, 236, 251

South African (Bushman and
Hottentot), 247

-, spoken, its effect on gesture,
140

the minimum of it, when ex-
pressive, the best, 243
Languages, Romance, and term “is,"

249
Lankester, Prof., and Darwinism, 4
Larnay (Poitiers), convent at, 166
Latent idea of being in every con-
cept, 271

presence of the copula, 145

universals, 271
Latham, Dr., 275
Laughter, 19, 153
Laura Bridgman, 166
Lausanne, an afflicted child at, 166
Laying foundation of intellectual ac-

tion by sensation, 198, 199
Le Muséon, 33
Leap of progress supposed in mental

development, 209
Leibnitz, 99, 112
Lemurs, 22
Leroy and counting crow, 79

and wolves, 76
“Les Animaux Perfectibles," 149
Letters of and to Prof. Max Müller,

99-116
Lewes, and exaggeration in anecdotes

of animals, 149
Lightning-like rapidity of thought,

255
Limit to evolution, 301

>

Machine, Babbage's calculating, 175

its making and using, 267
Making and using machines, 267
Malaise, feeling of, 22
Malay language, 246
Mallery, Colonel, and language of

gesture, 138, 145
“Mama pleased to Dodo," 208
Man, abnormal, may be lower than
brutes, 8

Alfred Wallace's views con-
cerning him, 3, 27
- and Aristotle, 31, 32

Darwin's views concerning
him, 3

evolved from brute, representa-
tion of, 288
, primitive, 33

and his concepts, 234

his intelligence, 235
Prof. Lankester's views con-
cerning him, 4

, what he is, 226
Man's asserted bestiality, 4

- decay and retrogression, 230
development and time, 237

distinction lies in mental not
verbal affirmation, 180

nature proved essentially dis-
tinct by ethics, 273

« НазадПродовжити »