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Cannon-ball, 248
Captain Johnson and shot monkey,

134
Carlyle and metaphor, 272
Cartesianism, 39
Cat and his friend the dog, 159
- and knocking at doors, 84
- and piano, illustration from,

Climates favourable for isolated chil-

dren, 232
Clock, sound of, 238
Clock's hand, illustration from, 12
Cloud of materialism, 31
Coachman and parrot, 155, 161
Cockatoo, absurd tale concerning one,

136

151

with bone fixed in mouth, 261
Categories of language, 121, 126, 127,

241
Catholicism and nature of brutes, 32
Cats getting help, 133

- jumping on chairs, 133
Causation, apprehension of by dog,

85
Cause for disbelief in cause, 211
- idea of, and muscular effort, 211 |
Chambers and exaggeration in anec-

dotes of animals, 149
Charlevoix, 274
Chattering of apes, 286
Chauncey Wright, Mr., 209
Chef and dinner, illustration from,

200
Chemical action lays a foundation for

vital activity, 199

vitality, sensi-

Chemistry, physics, vitality, sensi-

tivity, and intellect, 199
Child-language and Chinese, 245
Child saying “Ego” spontaneously,

146
Children and apes, 17
- and conceptual power, mistake

about, 190
- have most abstract ideas, 270
- idiotic, and Dr. Scott, 137
- invent arbitrary signs, 161
- isolated, originating languages,

231
- language of, 206, 221, 222, 245,
263

, though speechless, may gesture
intelligently, 138, 204
Children's names for objects, 217
Child's pantomime, 218
- recognition of dogs, 188
Chimpanzee “Sally,” her tricks, 80

- uses no metaphor, 273
Chinese and child-language, 245
Civilization and early man, 33
Clamor concomitans, 103, 107
Classifications of ideas and sensuous

cognitive affections, 59
Clearer possible intuition of first

men, 231
Clicks of Africans, 247, 286, 287

Code, semiotic, of our common hu-

manity, 138
Cognition, unconscious and intellec-

tual, 6;
Cognitions, direct and reflex, must be

distinguished, 61, 62
Cognitive sensuous affections, 59
Collected silent instruments do not

sound, 211
Collective ideas, 40
Collie-dog and Miss Benson, 78
Colonel Mallery and gesture-lan-

guage, 138, 145
Common sense and children, 298
Comparative philology, 228, 229
Completion of feeling of harmony

craved, 77
Complex ideas, 56
Compound ideas, 56
Concept “is,” 259
- of the sun, 69, 254
Conception is not taking or putting

together, 68
Conceptions concerning previous ap-

prehension, 192
= ethical, and man's distinctness

of kind, 273
Concepts, 56, 58, 59, 66, 73, 88, 93,

95, 97, 145, 175, 177-179, 189,

190, 236, 254, 271
- all, imply existence, real or

ideal, 179
- and percepts of children and
adults, 192
- called forth by any objects, 205

contain intellectual and sensuous
elements side by side, 271
-, higher ones, 190
- in Sanskrit roots, 236

, innate faculty of their external
expression, 232
-, logic of, 38, 90, 92
-, lower ones, 189, 220
- not to be degraded to recepts,
117

, objective and subjective, 89
- of being, etc., as expressed by

deaf-mutes, 145
- of primitive man, 234

- without names, 219, 220

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Conceptual ideation, 205

- not a mere result of physi.
cal conditions, 152
- judgments, 192

-power and children, mistake
about, 190
Conclave of ants, 130
Concluding remarks, 295
Concrete ideas, 55, 59
Condition of early man, 33
Conditions antecedent to evocation

of consciousness, 199
- of knowledge, 183
- of structure and faculty of lan-

guage, 142
Conjunctive sentence expressed by

an alternative or contrast, 144
Connotative terms, 126, 174

-- or signs, 174, 185, 186,

187
Consciousness, 37, 62
— and reason, 193
- conditions antecedent to its
evolution, 199

-, direct, not reflex, indispensable
to knowledge, 183

does not necessitate use of the
first person, 204

- inscrutable in origin, 212
Consentience, 62, 203
Consequences of upholding man's

rationality, 32
Continuity, illustrations concerning,

12

Day, our own, its besetting sin, 299
Danger, idea of, and animals, 76
- signals, 290
Darwin, Mr., his grandchild, 239
Darwin's dog looking up into a tree,

75
- hypothesis as to speech origin,

284, 288
- pleasure in exalting plants, 149
- views as to man, 3
Dayak language, 257
De Harlez, Mgr., 33
Deaf and dumb first express what they

most desire to express, 143
Deaf-mute and Mr. Romanes, 223
- , ignorant one's idea of the Bible,

165
- who must have reflected, 223
Deaf-mutes, 96
- and idea of being, 145

and Indians, 138, 139
- and inherited organization, 141
- and the Abbé Sicard, 143

, innate intellectuality of, 143,
145, 232
— , their abnormal condition, 164

, uneducated, their status, 164
Decay of social conditions, 230
Defect of our nature necessitates

language and ratiocination, 243
Defects of savages exaggerated, 274
Definition of a sense-perception, 41
- of an idea, 41
Degradation of art and science, 299
Degraded concepts are not recepts,

117
Degrees of self-consciousness, 202
Delusion of explaining feelings by

motions, 30
Denominational science, 31
Denominative terms, 126, 174, 185,

187, 192
Denotative terms, 126, 174, 185
Descartes, 23, 37-39
Desire, secret, to exalt animals, 149
Despising, the unreasonably, terms

not ours, 165
Detection, abstract idea of, 142

- not universal in nature, 10
Contradictory opinions about sur-

vivals in language, 262
Contrast may express a conjunctive

sentence, 144
Conventional acts, 121, 122, 126-

128
Conversation held with a cockatoo,

136
— in gesture of different Indians,
139

— with a cowherd, 238
Coptic, 253
Copula, fallacy as to, 179, 249
- implied, 221, 222

may be latent, yet essentially
present, 145
Counting crow, so said, 79
- of the chimpanzee “Sally," 80
- what it implies, 81, 91
Cousin, 39
Cowherd's conversation, 238
Craving feeling for completion of a

harmony, 77

Development, mental, supposed leap
of progress in, 209

of man and time, 237
Difference, as to potentiality of su-

preme importance, 222
- of essential nature involves that

of origin, 5
- of kind between recepts and
concepts, 66
- profound, of acts externally

similar, 219
Differences between ideas and feelings,

45, 46
- in animals' natures may modify
their recepts, 94, 124

--, natural, of talent, 224
Different groups of languages, 231
- races of Indians can converse

together by gesture, 139
Difficulty as to imagining man's

separate origin, 299
“Dig, feed," 245
“Digging he," 248
Dinner and chef, illustration from,

200
Dinornis, 108, 113
Dionæa and Drosera, 22, 49
Direct and refiex cognitions must be

distinguished, 61, 62
- consciousness, 202

- suffices for intellect, 125,
197
— not reflex, consciousness indis-
pensable for knowledge, 183, 197,
203

- thought must precede reflex,

183, 197, 203
Direction, abstract idea of, 142
Disbelief in cause, caused ? 211
Discontinuity in nature, 10
Discourse held with a cockatoo, 136
Discovery of principle of the screw

by a monkey, 86
Discrimination, an ambiguous term,

Distinction of man lies in mental, not

verbal affirmation, 180
- of noun and verb as not yet

realized, 245
“Dit ki," 206, 221, 222, 263
Divers tongues and reason, 228
Divine volition and natural pheno.

mena, 235
Dr. Hales, 231
- Latham, 275
-- Noble, of Manchester, 219

Sandwith, 275
Scott and idiotic children, 137

Wilks and associated feelings,
155
Dog and his cat-friend, 159

- and inverted man, 276
- and thunder, 85
- hunting pigs after family
prayers, 78
– of Darwin looking up into a
tree, 75
- playing and M. Quatrefages,
201
- wagging or stiffening its tail,
- 152
Dogs and tidal waves, 75
- begging, 123, 219

— called by parrots, 157, 159, 184,
278
- distinguished by young child-
ren, 188
- of Sir John Lubbock, 133
- pointing, 132
- pulling aprons, 132, 219

, thirsty, running to hollows, 75
Dog's arms and those of telegraph-

post, 220
Dolomite, crystals, and spathic iren,

21
| Double meanings to primitive terms,

234
Doubling of stags, 77
Dough, parrot up to its knees in, 133
Drawing upon time, 287
Dread of wolves, not of a particular

wolf, by sheep, 158
Drosera and Dionæa, 22, 49
Du Ponceau, 274
Dugong, 108, 113
Duilhé, Canon F., 166
Dumb animals, if rational, would in-

vent a gesture-language, 163
Dureau de la Malle, Aristotle, and

Buffon, 25
Dynamic breaks in nature, 13
- state of a lighted candle, 200
Dynamical principles, 28

67

Disputed primeval family of lan-

guage, 262
Distinct nature of man demonstrated

by ethics, 273
Distinction as to origin, 5, 225
- as to potentiality greatest in
biology, 222
- between ideas and feelings, 45,
46
- between reflex and direct cogni.
tions must be recognized, 61, 62

- of generic and general terms un-
tenable, 270

Evolution of language by dumb ra-

tional animals, 163
- of man from brute, representa-

tion of, 288
Exaggeration of defects of savages,

274
- of importance of term “I,” 205
Exaggerations in anecdotes of animals,

149
Exalting plants, Darwin's pleasure

in, 149
Examples of monosyllabic proposi.

tions, 206, 207, 245
Exercise of sensitivity must precede

and is not thought, 203
Exigencies of expression, 264
“Exist” and “existence" as terms,

250, 251
Existence and local presence, 251
- as implied in propositions, 177
- idea of, expressed by gesture,

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Early man, condition of, 33
Ease of imagining what is wanted,

284, 285, 298
Easiest imaginations tend to be

adopted, 30
- signs are articulate ones, 244
Effect of spoken language on gesture,

140
Efforts, muscular, and idea of cause,

211
“ Ego” said spontaneously by child,

146
Egyptians and the substantive verb,

253
Ejective origin of subjective know-

ledge, 210
Ejects, 210
Element of thought, the simplest, a

judgment, 175, 217, 242, 243
Elements of thought, what they are

not, 117
Elephant blowing to bring an object

nearer, 75
Elevation of terms, 272
Embodied intellect, 199
Emotion of the ludicrous, 19
Emotional language, 121, 156
- signs, 126, 127
English labourers and intellect, 237,

238
Enrichment of material for gesture,

expression, 140
Enunciation of copula not essential,

222
Equality, idea of, 96
- ,- , expressed by gesture, 145
Essence of moral judgments different

from all others, 273
Essential characters of a sign, 7

presence of copula when not
expressed, 145
Essentially different natures must

differ in origin, 5
- distinct nature of man shown by

ethics, 273
Ethical propositions, 273
Ethics demonstrate man's distinction

of nature, 273
Events, logic of, 221
Every concept and proposition im-
plies existence, 179

- includes idea of “being,"
271
Evocation of consciousness, 199
Evolution judged by analogy discon-

tinuous ultimately, 14

- of names not necessary for con-

ception, 218, 220
- possible and ideal, is real, 178
Existences, simultaneous, and con-

tinuity, 12
Expectant feelings from association,
Experience necessary for imagination,

26, 61
Explanation of feelings by motions,
delusive, 30

-- of parrot's actions, 154, 161
- of phenomena by pulverizing

them, 285
Explicit judgments, 174, 217
- language, 127
Expression and intellect simultaneous
in origin, 236

_" arises out of," ambiguous, 43
- by gesture of the idea time, 145

- first given by deaf and dumb to
what they most want to express,

143
- in Hebrew for existence, 251
- must be preceded by thought,
254

"my work” meaning different
things, 247
- of a conjunctive sentence by
alternative or contrast, 144

- of abstract ideas by deaf-mutes,
145
-- of concepts, innate faculty of, 232
- of copula not essential, 222
- of willingness by term “belief,"

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Expression, order of, does not bind what they most desire to express,
thought, 256

143
Expressions meant must be enter. First men had possibly clearest in-
tained, 254

tuitions, 231
- , monosyllabic, 207

- person, use of, not necessary for
- of children, 206

consciousness, 204
- of propositions by monosyllables, Fittest, survival of, and reason, 108–
206, 207, 245

112
Extension, alleged, of articulate signs Flight of thought, 173
by parrots, 157, 185

- , utility of, 173
Externally similar acts may differ Flora of St. Helena, 108, 113
profoundly, 219

Fly and spider, 87
Exuberance of synonyms, 274

Fogs of Realism, 104
Following the line of least resistance,

30
F

Forbes, Mr., and a monkey, 133

Forceps, obstetric, illustration from,
Facial contortions and intellect, 281
267

Foreshadowings in nature, 22
Faculties, innate, 232

Formal and material activities, 67,
mathematical, musical, and 85
artistic, origin of, 27

— and material classifying, etc.,
Faculty of conception generally, not 64
constituted by nervous structure, Formally or really intentional acts,
142

122
- of language and nervous in Foundation of higher natures laid in
herited structure, 141, 142

lower, 21
Fallacy as to copula, 179, 249

Foundations of intellect and self-con-
Families of languages, 231

sciousness, 198, 199
Farm-yard and fox, illustration from, Fox and farm-yard, illustration from,

50
Farrar, Archdeacon, 235, 237, 240 Freedom of Catholics as regards the
Father Maurus's “Questiones Philo nature of brutes, 32
sophicæ, 57

of thought, 33
"Faiher-of-thee, age-of-him,” 257 Free-will and nature's phenomena,
Fear of thunder by dog, 85

235
Feejee language, 257

Friedrich Müller, 99
Feeling of craving, 279

Fundamental metaphor, 271
- of malaise, 74

- relations between physical,
— without knowledge, 66

chemical, and vital powers, 199
Feelings analogous to universals, 57, Funereal rites of bees, 134

158
— and ideas, differences between,
45, 46

expectant ones, from associa-
tion, 63

Galton, Mr. F., 44, III
- explained by motions, a delu - photographs, 44
sion, 30

Garnett, Mr., 252, 253, 280
, logic of, 71

Geiger, Herr, 99, 253, 278
- of association, and Dr. Wilks, General characters first apprehended
155

by nascent intelligence, 156
- of others, how known, 22

- nature of words, nominalists
Fichte, 40

must admit they can perceive, 39
Figurative language and savages, - ideas, 56, 59
234, 272

- , or notions, of plants, 49
Figures of speech due to its poverty, - parallelism between specch and
234

intellect, 230
First expressed by deaf and dumb | Generation, spontaneous, 10

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