Зображення сторінки
PDF
ePub

hypotheses to the best of our ability, and now offer the results at which we have arrived to the judgment of readers interested in that problem which we deen the most important one of our time—the problem which concerns the distinctness or non-distinctness as to nature, and therefore as to origin, of human reason.

INDEX.

A

A name more than a word, 46, 53
Abbé Sicard and deaf-mutes, 143
Abnormal condition of deaf-mutes,

164
- man may be lower than brutes, 8
Absolute distinctness of man shown
by ethics, 273

truth and mechanical hypo-
theses, 30

truths, knowledge of, 29
Abstract concepts and deaf-mutes, 145
idea of danger and animals, 76

“time," expressed by
gesture, 145
ideas, 56, 59
of ripeness, appearance,

de-
tection, direction, and surprise, 142
Abstraction, 47, 51, 54, 64, 70

-, power of, not in brutes, 42
Absurd tale about a cockatoo, 136
Accidental acts, 122, 127

-, unintentional, making of facts
known, 192
Accidentally isolated children and

language, 231
Accoucheur, illustration from, 281
Acquired semiotic value asserted, 283
Acquisitional signs, 123, 127
Actions instantaneous in nature, 12

irrational, of animals, 124
misread, 85
of parrots explained, 154, 161

volitions, and primitive man,
234
Acts, conventional ones, 122, 126,
127

formally and materially inten-
tional, what they are, 122

imitational ones, 124
impulsional ones, 122

Acts, intellectual, not necessarily
reflex, 125

of salutation apparently similar
may differ profoundly, 219

reveal inner nature, 49
Adam, 33
Adjectives and substantives, 248

by position, 248
Adoption of the easiest imaginations,

30
Adumbration of higher nature; in

lower, 21, 22, 83
Adverbs and pronouns, 245
Affections, sensuous and cognitive, 59

(sensuous) and ideas, relations
between, 94
Africa, South, and children, 232
Agglutination, 262
Agglutinative language, 231
Agriculture and primitive man, 33
All men are bipeds, meaning of, 257
Alternative, an, may express a con-

junctive sentence, 144
Amalgamation of feelings not an idea,

45
Ambiguity of phrase “ Arise out of,"
43

of the term “conventional," 122
of the term “discriminate," 67

of the term “know," 154
Ambiguous expression, growth of
consciousness, 247
use of the term

seen,” 186
use of the word “understand,"
151
Amoeba, psychical principle of, 73
An avowed prejudice of Dr. Weis-

mann, lo
Analogy between flight and thought,
172

indicates discontinuity in evolu-
tion, 14

158

Analogy of feelings to universals, 57,

reveals nature of infants and
savages, 8
Analysis of the verb, 252

ultimate, of nature shows voli-
tion, 235
Analytic language, 231
Anecdote, absurd one about a cocka-

too, 136
Anecdotes about savages' defects ex-
aggerated, 274

of animals, exaggerations in,
129, 149

of shot monkeys, 133-135
Animals and infants, asserted parallel-
ism between, 16

dumb, if rational would invent
a gesture-language, 163

irrational acts of, 124
may have unimaginable powers,
61

obtaining help, 133

share our lower mental powers,
216

speechless, 298

understanding words, how, 148,
160
Animals' acts, their nature misrepre-
sented, 130

natures may modify their re-
cepts, 94, 124
Animistic thought, 233, 234
Animus of narrators of anecdotes of

animals, 130
Ant, psychical principle of, 73
Antecedent conditions for evocation

of consciousness, 199
Anthropoid apes and primitive man,
33

shaping stones, 292
Ants, tales of, 130, 131

tunnelling, and Mr. Belt, 76
Any objects will call forth concepts,

205
Ape and principle of the screw, 86

psychical principle of, 73
Apes and children, 17

and primitive man, 33

chattering of, 286
, gesture-signs of, 133, 135

pointing, 82, 135
Aphasia and gesture-language, 138
Apparently similar actions may differ

profoundly, 219
Appearance, abstract idea of, 142
Apple-tree and boy, tale in gesture,

140

Appleyard, 274
Apposition in consciousness, 221, 256

not necessarily assertion, 256,
257

- with meaning may be assertion,
277
Apprehension, first, of general cha-
racters by nascent intelligence, 156

of causation by dog, 85
Aprons, etc., pulled by dogs, 132, 153,

164
Apteryx, 108, 113
Aquinas, St. Thomas, 39, 57
Arbitrary signs invented by children,

161
Archdeacon Farrar, 235, 237, 240
Archiepiscopal collie-dog, 78
Arguments, scholastic, against nomi-

nalism, 39
“Arise out of,” ambiguity of the

phrase, 43
Aristotelian system of philosophy,

39, 57
Aristotle, 25, 31, 40

and man, 25, 31, 32, 200, 231,
239, 259

, Buffon, and Dureau de la Malle,
25
Arms of dog and telegraph-post, 220
Art and primitive man, 33
Article of Prof. Max Müller in

Nineteenth Century, 117
Articulate irrational sounds, 120

rational sounds, 121

signs said to be extended by
parrots, 157, 185

the quickest and easiest
ones, 244
Articulation and dog's tail, 152

and prehistoric animals, 33

innate tendency to, 172
meaningless, 146
not necessarily intellectual, 152

, primitive, 147
Articulus stantis vel cadentis ecclesia,

32
Artistic faculties, origin of, 27
Aryan languages, 246
“As many men as many bipeds,”

256
As-mi, the Sanskrit term, 251
Asserted funereal rites of bees, 134

parallelism between animals and
infants, 16
Assertion not apposition, 256, 257
Associated and expectant feelings, 63
Association, British, at Sheffield, 22
Associational sign-making, 127

Associations of feelings and Dr.

Wilks, 155
Astronomer and star, 269
Attention and stretching to, 272

sensuous, 209
Attribute of existence, its signifi-

cance, 177
Authority not appealed to, but evi.

dence, 39, 161, 294
Author's position, 5, 202, 242

B

Birds talking, 154, 156, 160, 191, 278
Bodily requirements of a rational

animal, 83
Body-begging by monkeys, 134
Bolting a door, illustration from, 67
Born-mutes and Mr. Tylor, 146
Bottle, sight of, and parrot, 155
Boy and apple-tree, tale in gesture,
140

biting his own arm, 204
striking another, as expressed by
the deaf and dumb, 143

Box," the term, 244
Bradley, 195
Brain and mind, 219
Bramston, Miss, and collie-dog, 79
Brazil and children, 232
Breaking vocal tones, 286
Breaks in nature, 10

- no evidence against, 300

of dynamic order, 13
Bridgman, Laura, 166
Bright things and child, 185, 186,

269, 278
British Association at Sheffield, 22
Bronze men and iron men, 217
Brush unscrewed by a monkey, 86
Brute evolved into man, representa-

tion of, 288
Brutes demonstrated of different na-
ture from us by ethics, 273
dumb, 298
have no ideas, 41
have no power of abstraction, 42
higher than abnormal men may
8

rational, and objective contra-
diction, 215

their nature, and Catholicism,
32
Büchner, Prof., and pious bees, 134
Buffon, Aristotle, and Dureau de la

Malle, 24
Bunsen and language, 251
Bushmen, their clicks, 247, 286, 287

be,

С

Babbage's calculating machine, 175
Baby names for objects, 217

talk, 206, 221, 222, 245, 263,
270
Bain, Prof., and exaggeration in anec-

dotes of animals, 149
Ballets, pantomime of, 218, 260
Balls, small, in motion, 30
Bates, Mr., staggered, 130
Bathing described in pantomime, 218
Bathos and a cockatoo, 25, 136
Bear pawing for floating bread, 75
Beavers, 292
Bees practising funereal rites, 134
Beggarly elements of thought, 273
Begging dogs, 123

the question, 21
Beginning of language, 241

Being and Knowing,” work of
Prof. Veitch, 196

as expressed in Hebrew, 251
idea of, 70, 249

and deaf-mutes, 145
and substantive verb, 249

latent in every concept,
271
Belt, Mr., and ants in conclave, 130

and tunnelling American
ants, 76
Benson, Miss, and collie-dog, 78
Berkeley, 40, 239
Besetting sin of our day, 299
Best language is the minimum that

expresses clearly, 243
Bestiality of man, 4, 32
Bias of narrators of anecdotes of

animals, 129, 149
Bible, idea of, and ignorant deaf-

mutes, 165
Big-enough-to-be-worth-a-prolonged-

effort, idea of, 49
Binet, M., III, 112
Biological distinction as to poten-

tiality the most important one, 222

>

Cage, illustration from, 268
Caird, Prof., 195
Calculating machine, Babbage's, 175
Caldwell, 274
California and children, 232
Calling of dogs by parrots, 157, 159,

184
Canadian villages and neglected chil-

dren, 232

« НазадПродовжити »