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your most enamoured husband, and humble ser, vant,

RICH. STEELE, Mr. Addison is your humble servant.

LETTER LXXIII. TO Mrs. STEELE.

I

DEAR PRUE, Seven in the Morning, Sept. 9, 1708. AM going this morning to visit Mr. Sartré*

at his country house, to which place Mr. Addison conveys me in coach and four.

Mr. Clay f, who is now at Thistleworth, will not be in town till to-morrow, and I want to consult him in some dispatches I am making for the West-Indies.

I am Mrs. Binns's humble servant; and your most affectionate, obedient husband,

Rich. STEELE. My service to Ally.

* James Sartré, M. A. formerly minister at Montpelier, and prebendary of Westminster, from May 17, 1688, till his death, Sept. 5, 1713. Swift, in his Journal to Stella, Oct. 25, 1910, says, “I dined to-day with Mr. Addison and Steele, and a “ fifter of Mr. Addison, who is married to one Mons. Sartré, a “ Frenchman, prebendary of Westminster, who has a delicious "house and gardeņs; yet I thought it was a fort of monaftic “ life in those cloisters, and I liked Laracor better. Addison's “ sister is a sort of wit, very like him. I was not fond of her.” This lady was afterwards married to Daniel Combs, esq.

+ Afterwards one of STEELE's coadjutors in the SPECTATOR. Some account of him will be esteemed a favour.

LETTER

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LETTER LXXIV. To Mrs. STEELE.

DEAR PRUE,

Sept. 13, 1708. WRITE to you in obedience to what you

ordered me; but there are not words to express the tenderness I have for you. Love is too harsh a word for it; but if you knew how my heart akes when you speak an unkind word to me, and springs with joy when you smile upon me, I am sure you would place your glory rather in preserving my happiness like a good wife, than tormenting me like a peevish beauty. Good Prue, write me word you shall be overjoyed at my return to you, and pity the aukward figure I make when I pretend to resist you, by complying always with the reasonable demands of your enamoured husband,

Rich. STEELE, P.S. I am Mrs. Binns's servant.

LETTER LXXV. TO Mrs. STEELE.

DIAR PRUE,

Sept. 14, 1708. FEAR I shall not be so happy as to see you

till Thursday, having some business which keeps me in town. I shall to-day visit my mother, in order to discourse about proper methods

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for paying off, or laying the debt on your estate into one hand. I hope God will bless my fincere endeavours, so as that we may live without the cares of this life, with a chearful prospect of a better. It is in no one's power but Prue's to make me constant in such a regular course. Therefore will not doubt but you will be very good-humoured, and be a constant feast to your affectionate husband,

Rich. STEELE. My obedient service to Mrs. Binns.

LETTER LXXVI. To Mrs. STEELE.

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DEAR PRUE,

Five in the Evening, Sept. 19, 1708. SEND you seven pennyworth of walnuts

at five a penny, which is the greatest proof I can give you at present of my being, with my whole heart, yours,

Rich. STEELE. The little horse comes back with the boy, who returns with him for me on Wednesday evening; in the mean time, I believe, it will be well that he runs in the Park.

I ain Mrs. Binns's servant.

Since I writ this I came to the place where the boy was ordered with the horses; and, not finding bim, sent this bearer, left you should be in fears, the boy not returning. P. S. There are but 29 walnuts.

LETTER

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DEAR "RUE,

Sept. 20, 1708. F a fervant I sent last night got to Hamptoncourt, you

received 29 walnuts and a letter from me.

I inclose the Gazette, and am, with all my soul, your passionate lover, and faithful husband,

Rich. STEELE. Since I writ the above, I have found half an hundred more of walnuts, which I send herewith.

My service to Binns.

LETTER LXXVIII. To Mrs. STEELE.

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DEAR, DEAR PRUE,

Sept. 21, 1708. TOUR pretty letter, with so much good

nature and kindness, which I received yesterday, is a perfect pleasure to me. I am at present very much out of humour upon another account, Tryon having put off the payment of my 200 l. which I ought to have received yesterday, till further time. But I hope, when Mr. Clay comes to town to-morrow, he will see me justified. I am, with the tendereft affection, ever yours,

Rich. STEELE.

LETTER

LETTER LXXIX. To Mrs. SteelE.

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DEAR PRUE, Sandy-end, Sept. 22, 1708.

FTER being very busy all this day, I am

come hither to dinner with Mr. Addison and Mr. Clay, who are your servants; and I take this time from eating, while others are busy at it at the table. Yours, yours, ever, ever,

Rich. STEELE.

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DEAR PRUE,

Sept. 27, 1708,

Monday, Seven at Night. OU see that you are obeyed in every

thing, and that I write over-night for the day following. I shall now in earnest, by Mr. Clay's good conduct, manage my business with that method as shall make me easy. The news, I am told, you had last night, of the taking of Lille, does not prove true; but I hope we shall have it soon. I shall send by to-morrow's coach. I am, dear Prue, a little in drink, but at all times your faithful husband, Rich, STEELE.

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