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LETTER XXXVII. To Mrs. SCURLOCK.

MY DEAR,
Eight o'Clock, Fountain Tavern, O&t. 22, 1707.
BEG of you not to be uneasy, for I have

done a great deal of business to-day very successfully, and wait an hour or two about my Gazette. Your obliged husband,

Rich. STEELE.

ch.

I

LETTER XXXVIII. To Mrs. SCURLOCK.

Ost. 28, 1707,

I

MY DEAR,

Charing-cross, almost Three in the Afternoon. HAVE been detained all this morning soli

citing some business between the Treasury and« our office; and my boy flipping out of the way, I have not had any one to send that you might not stay dinner. Mr. Addison does not remove till to-morrow, therefore I cannot think of moving my goods out of his lodgings. I am come to a tavern alone to eat a steak, after which I shall return to the office, whither I defire you would send Will. I am with the most tender affection, your obedient husband,

Rich. STEELE. Send by Will the receipt *.

* See Letter XXXIX.

LETTER

LETTER XXXIX. To Mrs. SCURLOCK, [sen.]

HONOURED MADAM,

Lord Sunderland's Office, Oat. 28, 1707. WAS very glad to find last post that my

wife had a letter, which informed her of the amendment of your health. She tells me there is, at the same time, a message sent her, that my hand is required for the payment of some money in the country. I accordingly inclose such a direction *, and, in any thing that it may be neceilary to have my concurrence, you have it without reserve ; for I fincerely rely upon your prudence and goodness, both in acting for me, and in favour to me.

If you think it convenient that I do this in a more formal way, be pleased to command, Madam, your most obedient for, and most humble servant, Rich. STEELE.

LETTER XL. Tó Mrs. SCURLOCK, [sen.]

I

HONOURED MADAM,

Nov. 4, 1707 AM forry your indifpofition continues, and

keeps you in the country; I have myself been under a very severe illness for some days, but am now almost recovered. This is my

* See P.S. Letter XXXVIII.

wife's

wife's birth-day *, and I am come down stairs to celebrate it with as much good-humour as my present health will permit. Your health is not omitted in our chearful moments, and your company will extremely improve them. I am, Madam, your most obedient son, and most humble servant,

Rich. STEELE. Your daughter has been very ill till this day. She gives her duty.

LETTER XLI.

To Mrs. SCURLOCKt.

I

'HONOURED MADAM,

Nov. 13, 1707. AM very glad to hear, by uncle Scurlock's

last letters, that you have taken-in your horses in order to your journey. Since my

last to you, I have had an affliction which was perfectly new to me; a fit of the gout. I am a little awkward at iny crutches, and have been not so patient as longer experience of this sort of evil usually makes us. Our new house will be ready for our goods next week; and, as soon as it is so, we will remove to it. I am out of pain, though I cannot ftir; in the mean while * See Letter I. note i.

+ From this place, where-ever a letter is addressed “ To Mrs. “ Scurlock," it will be understood to be the mother of Mrs. (afterwards Lady) Steele. The XXII first letters, though so addressed, are to the daughter. Letters XXV. XXVII. XXXIII. XXXV, XXXVIII. (being all after marriage) should have been “ To Mrs. Steele." But this is accounted for in the second note on Letter XXVI. p. 24 and 25, where, line 11 from the bottom, after 6 time and chance,” add, or rather which " have been industriously suppressed."

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your

your daughter is dancing at the other end of of the room. She gives her duty to you. I am extremely obliged to my uncle Scurlock for his kind present, which will be in town to-morrow night. I am, Madam, your most obedient fon, and most humble servant, RICH. STEELE.

LETTER XLII. To Mrs. SCURLOCK.

M

HONOURED MADAM,

Lord Sunderland's Office, Nov. 20, 1707. Y wife shewed me a letter of the 15th

from Mrs. Pugh, wherein there are the general complaints under which every body at present is fighing, whose concerns are wholly in land. Chearful and ingenuous tempers may agree so well, and concert their affairs in such a manner, as to make all things easy. I extremely long to see you ; and hope to be on my legs to receive you, when I first do myself the honour of kneeling to you, and telling how much I am, Madam, your moft obedient son, and most humble servant,

Rich. STEELE. My absolute governess gives her duty to you.

LETTER XLII. To Mrs. STEELE.

Dec. 8, 1707.

I

DEAR RULER,
CANNOT wait upon you to day to Hainp-
ton-Court. I have the Weft-Indian business

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On my hands *, and find very niuch to be done before Thursday's post. I shall dine at our table at Court, where the bearer knows how to come to me with any orders for your obedient husband, and most humble servant,

Rich. STEELE. My duty to my mother.

LETTER XLIV.

To Mrs. STEELE.

MY DEAR, DEAR WIFE,

Dec. 22, 1707 I

WRITE to let you know I do not come

home to dinner, being obliged to attend some business abroad, of which I shall give you an account (when I fee you in the evening', as becomes your dutiful and obedient husband,

Rich, STEELE.

LETTER XLV.

To Mrs. STEELE.

DEAR PRUE;

Devil Tavern, Temple-Bar, Jan. 3, 1708.

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day, and inclose two guineas as earnest of more. Dear Prue, I cannot come home to dinner. I languish for your welfare, and will

The plantation in Barbados left to STEELE by his first wife,
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never

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