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LETTER CCCLIV. To Mrs. Eliz, STEELE,

I

DEAR BETTY,

April 8, 1724. DESIRE you to be carefully dressed to-day

in your black, in order to receive a visitant in honour of your brother ; let your sister be in her white; and be both as chearfully suited as you can be. I shall call upon you soon after dinner, and am your friend upon all occafions. Dear Betty, your obedient, faithful father,

Rich. STEELE.

LETTER CCCLV. To Mrs. ELIZ. STEELE.

I

DEAR BETTY,

June 25, 1724 WAS much troubled to find you were sent

to my lodgings with your keys. I hope you will find every thing right there. But, be exact in all your affairs hereafter, and we shall meet with fewer disappointments than we have hitherto met with. I am, your affectionate father,

Rich. STEELE.

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LETTER CCCLVI. Mr. MORGAN to Sir

RICHARD STEELE.

Dec. 6, 1724

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HONOURED SIR,

CAME on purpose, on Friday evening, to

wait on you, in order to return you thanks for all favours, but particularly for the honour you were pleased to do me in fignifying your and pretty Mrs. Steele's thoughts, in relation to her unfortunate, though fincere humble servant: but it seems my visit was unseasonable; and, since that time, I have not been very well, so hope you will pardon me for not making my ac. knowledgements earlier. Mr. Prichard was very just in delivering me your messages; but the last at once awed me into silence, otherwise I should not have been under the same roof without paying my respects to you, but when I found my company was rather an offence than otherwise, I chose to withdraw. It is with the utmost concern that I observe the young lady is pleased to conceive a particular prejudice to me. However, notwithstanding all that, I must beg leave to assure you that I shall always have the utmost veneration for worthy Sir Richard Steele, and his fair, but cruel, daughter, though with a disinterested view; and I fincerely wish her all the happiness imaginable in her choice; för since the lady, as I apprehend,

is pleased to command my filence, I must acqui-
esce under the severe fentence, and shall endea-
vour to avoid giving either of you any offence;
but, on the contrary, if ever it lies in my way
to be serviceable to you or yours, none shall be
readier to obey your commands than, good Sir,
your most obliged, and most obedient humble
servant,

ED. MORGAN.
My humble service attends good Mrs. Steele.

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LETTER CCCLVII. Sir RICHARD STEELE to

Mr. MORGAN *.

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Dec. 7, 1724

I

SIR,
HAD the other day the honour of a mef-

sage from you by Mr. Prichard, with an ac-
count that you had the greatest respect and love
for my daughter, and a request of my permission
to make your address to her. I told Mr. Pri-
chard, that “he who was to have her, must win
" her and wear her; that she was a girl of good
“ sense, and I should take that with her in
“ whomsoever pretended to her;" but, upon
speaking of the same subject that evening, and
mentioning your civility for her, to her, she told

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* From a paper in the hand-writing of Lady Trevor, intituled, An exact copy of a letter my father wrote to Mr. Edward “ Morgan, in answer to a message he sent him by Mr. Prichard, “ December the 6th, 1724."

me

me with a great deal of calmness and ease, that The was very young, and very well contented “ to wait her time and choice under my care; and begged of me to let you know, that nothing could do her a greater offence than such an application. I told Mr. Prichard this the same evening; but I cannot forbid it with more earneftness than I do now, and desire you would give my service to your father, to whom I am, as well as to you, Sir, your most obedient, humble servant,

Rich. STEELE.

LETTER CCCLVIII. Mr. MORGAN to Sir

RICHARD STEELE.

I

HONOURED SIR,

Dec. 19, 1724. AM so much at a loss for a sufficient apo

logy for my importunity on this occasion, that I submit myself entirely to your clemency, which, by all accounts, has hitherto been very extensive, but particularly so in favour of the distressed; which, since it is

my

misfortune to be one of that body at present, I hope to meet with your indulgence, if not compassion.

Self-preservation is what is natural to most; and, with that view, I flatter myself, you will pardon me, if I once more beg a favourable thought from you, and, if possible, from the young lady your daughter; for her moft irre

fiftible

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fiftible charms have, in my own defence, obliged me to be thus troublesome. Give me leave then, dear Sir, to tell you, that I find it is impoffible for me to avoid having the utmost love and respect for pretty Mrs. Steele, though, in pursuance to her severe decree, which I hope is not yet final, I have made it my study to act as agreeably thereto as possibly I could; for, ra. ther than give her the least uneasiness, I would torture myself first. I do not doubt but

my

father's circumstances and mine have been rendered to you in a worse light than what, pro. bably, upon a due enquiry, they may appear to be. I beg leave to affure you, that my designs are grounded upon a foot of honour ; and then, I hope, you will imagine those affairs must have come to light. However, it is an usual thing to meet with back-friends upon these occasions; but probably I may find them out at long-run. .

Were it possible the lady could conquer all objections to my person, I believe I should be able to convince you that my fortune is not despicable ; yet I must own it is a trifle when in competition with so inuch personal merit, which to me outbalances fortune, any more than what may be absolutely necessary to render the affairs of this world as happy as may be: but, were I master of ever so great a fortune, I should never think it so well bestowed as upon your daughter. I heartily ask pardon for trespassing so long upon

your

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