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dear Prue, your most affectionate, obsequious husband,

Rich. STEELE. A quarter of Molly's schooling is paid. The children are perfectly well.

LETTER CCLIV. To Lady STEELE.

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DEAR PRUE,

March 23, 1716-17, WRITE by your order, though I have no.

thing new. My money is not yet come to hand; and I am very impatient for it, because I would shew you, as soon as it is in my power, a reformation in the management of expence. I am, dear Prue, your most obedient, obliged husband,

Rich. STEELE.

LETTER CCLV. TO Lady STEELE.

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MY DEAREST PRUE,

March 26, 1717. HAVE received yours, wherein you give

me the sensible affliction of letting me know of the continual pain in your head. I could not meet with neceffary advice; but, according to the description you give me, I am confident washing your head in cold water will cure you ; I mean, having water poured on your head, and rubbed with an hand, from the crown of your head to the nape of your neck. When I lay in

your

your place, and on your pillow, I assure you, I fell into tears last night, to think that my charming little insolent might be then awake and in pain, and took it to be a fin to go to sleep.

For this tender passion towards you, I must be contented that your Prueship will condescend to call yourself my well-wisher. I anı going abroad, and write before I go out, left accidents should happen to prevent my writing at all. If I can meet with further advice for you, I will send it in a letter to Alexander. I am, dear Prue, ever thine,

RICH. STEELE.

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LETTER CCLVI. Fo Lady STEELE.

THE

DEAR PRUE,

March 30, 1717. THE omission of last post was occafioned by

my attendance on the Duke of Newcastle, who was in the chair at the Kit-cat. Be so good as to forgive me. We have not yet one fhilling from the commission, though 7501. is become due, nor indeed know we when to expect it. I hope, however, within few days to take up as much money as will pay off all hangers on, and to have no more for the future. I pant for leisure and tranquillity, which I hope to enjoy when we ineet again. lain, dear Prue, your most obedient, affectionate, faithful husband,

Rich. Steele. L2

LETTER

LETTER CCLVII. To Lady STEELE. DEAR PRUE,

April 2, 1717. AM just come from a parliamentary club;

and can only say all your family is well, especially he who is ever yours,

R. STEELE,

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LETTER CCLVIII. To Lady STEELE. DEAR PRUE,

April 9, 1777. WRITE, according to your advice, before

I go out in the morning; and indeed the House of Commons fit so late, that what with that, and being carried off to dinner, one is apt to run into the expence of the whole day, without having an hour to send to one's best friend. I gave Mrs. Evans the part of your letter, but there is no occasion for that caution ; the child in her eyes, and every where else, is in perfect good health. God be thanked, the rest are in the same condition ; and we want nothing here but the receipt of money. I dined yesterday in Chancery. lane, and, after dinner, visited Mr. Keck, who is very well, and much your Ladyship’s servant. Keep up your spirit, and let us live like a man and woman that love when we next meet. I embrace you, and am your most affectionate, and most obliged, hunble fervant,

Rich. STEELE.

LETTER

LETTER CCLIX. To the Lady STEELE, at
Carmarthen, South Wales. Frank, Richard Steele.

DEAR PRUE,

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your rallying letter*. The claims of the fair sex are, you say, unaccountable. It is well for you they are; for, I assure you, I think you both the faireft and the best of women.

I have been much at home and alone since we parted. I am come to a resolution of making my three children my partners, and will constantly lay up something out of all receipts of money for each of them, in a box bearing the name of the little one to whom it belongs. Betty grows tall, and has the best air I ever saw in any creature of her age. I am going to dine with the Speaker. Things at Court seem to be in a very uncertain way. I am, dear Prue, eternally yours,

Rich. STEELE.

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LETTER CCLX. To Lady STEELE.
DEAR PRUE,

April 10, 1717.
T is now Wednesday, and, meeting with

your letter, I write now, left I should not have leisure to-morrow, when our board are to meet very early. Now, as to your letter. You say I am reported a Tory. You know I have See Lett. CCXXXII. p. 130; and Lett. CCXXXIII. p. 131.

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always an unfashionable thing, called conscience, in all matters of judicature or justice. There happened, a little while ago, a petition to be brought into the House of Commons from the Roman-catholics, praying relief as to point of time, and the meaning of certain clauses which affected them. When there was a question just ready to be put upon this, as whether it should be rejected or not, I stood up, and said to this purpose:

" Mr. Speaker, “I cannot but be of opinion, that to put se"verities upon men merely on account of religion is a most grievous and unwarrantable

pro6 ceeding. But, indeed, the Roman-catholics " hold tenets which are inconsistent with the be“ ing and safety of a Protestant people; for this “ reason we are justitied in laying upon them " the penalties which the parliament has from “ time to time thought fit to inflict : but, Sir, “ let us not pursue Roman-catholics with the “ spirit of Roman-catholics, but act towards « them with the temper of our own religion. “ If we do so, we shall not expect them to do

any thing in less time than is necessary to do 6 it, or to conduct themselves by rules which " they do not understand,” &c.

When I had adventured to say this, others followed; and there is a bill directed for the re. lief of the petitioners. I suppose this gave an

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