Lincoln's Greatest Speech: The Second Inaugural

Передня обкладинка
Simon and Schuster, 2 черв. 2002 р. - 256 стор.
3 Рецензії/відгуки
Google не перевіряє відгуки, але виявляє та вилучає неправдивий контент
After four years of unspeakable horror and sacrifice on both sides, the Civil War was about to end. On March 4, 1865, at his Second Inaugural, President Lincoln did not offer the North the victory speech it yearned for, nor did he blame the South solely for the sin of slavery. Calling the whole nation to account, Lincoln offered a moral framework for peace and reconciliation. The speech was greeted with indifference, misunderstanding, and hostility by many in the Union. But it was a great work, the victorious culmination of Lincoln's own lifelong struggle with the issue of slavery, and he well understood it to be his most profound speech. Eventually this "with malice toward none" address would be accepted and revered as one of the greatest in the nation's history.
In 703 words, delivered slowly, Lincoln transformed the meaning of the suffering brought about by the Civil War. He offered reunification, not revenge. Among those present were black soldiers and confederate deserters, ordinary citizens from all over, the black leader Frederick Douglass, the Cabinet, and other notables. John Wilkes Booth is visible in the crowd behind the president as he addresses posterity.
Ronald C. White's compelling description of Lincoln's articulation of the nation's struggle and of the suffering of all -- North, South, soldier, slave -- offers new insight into Lincoln's own hard-won victory over doubt, and his promise of redemption and hope. White demonstrates with authority and passion how these words, delivered only weeks before his assassination, were the culmination of Lincoln's moral and rhetorical genius.

З цієї книги

Відгуки відвідувачів - Написати рецензію

Google не перевіряє відгуки, але виявляє та вилучає неправдивий контент

LibraryThing Review

Рецензія користувача  - MartinBodek - LibraryThing

I have an obsession with Lincoln that seems to be growing. I also am continuing efforts to refine my writing and oratory skills. To address all three at once, I came to the right place! Alliteration ... Читати огляд повністю

LibraryThing Review

Рецензія користувача  - estamm - LibraryThing

Somewhat standard fare, but I did like how the author deconstructed Lincoln's second inaugural address almost line by line to explain the historical context and what Lincoln meant. Nothing earth-shattering. Читати огляд повністю

Вибрані сторінки

Зміст

Printed Text of the Second Inaugural
17
1 Inauguration Day
21
2 At this second appearing
43
3 And the war came
60
4 somehow the cause of the war
81
5 Both read the same Bible and pray to the same God
100
6 The Almighty has His own purposes
121
7 every drop of blood drawn with the lash shall be paid by another drawn with the sword
150
EPILOGUE
200
APPENDIX I The Text of the Second Inaugural Address
205
Letter to Albert G Hodges
207
Meditation on the Divine Will
209
NOTES
211
BIBLIOGRAPHY
227
INDEX TO OTHER LINCOLN TEXTS
238
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
239

8 With malice toward none with charity for all
164
9 better than anything I have produced but it is not immediately popular
180

Інші видання - Показати все

Загальні терміни та фрази

Популярні уривки

Сторінка 17 - Both parties deprecated war, but one of them would make war rather than let the nation survive, and the other would accept war rather than let it perish. And the war came.
Сторінка 100 - Both read the same Bible and pray to the same God, and each invokes His aid against the other. It may seem strange that any men should dare to ask a just God's assistance in wringing their bread from the sweat of other men's faces, but let us judge not, that we be not judged.
Сторінка 19 - If we shall suppose that American slavery is one of those offences which, in the Providence of God, must needs come, but which having continued through His appointed time, He now wills to remove, and that He gives to both North and South this terrible war, as the woe due to those by whom the offence came, shall we discern therein any departure from those divine attributes which the believers in a living God always ascribe to Him? Fondly do we hope — fervently do we pray — that this mighty scourge...
Сторінка 76 - I shall have the most solemn one to "preserve, protect, and defend it." I am loath to close. We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature.
Сторінка 43 - At this second appearing to take the oath of the Presidential office, there is less occasion for an extended address than there was at the first. Then a statement somewhat in detail of a course to be pursued seemed very fitting and proper. Now, at the expiration of four years, during which public declarations have been constantly called forth on every point and phase of the great contest which still absorbs the attention and engrosses the energies of the nation, little that is new could be presented.
Сторінка 43 - The progress of our arms, upon which all else chiefly depends, is as well known to the public as to myself, and it is, I trust, reasonably satisfactory and encouraging to all. With high hope for the future, no prediction in regard to it is ventured.
Сторінка 122 - The will of God prevails. In great contests each party claims to act in accordance with the will of God. Both may be and one must be wrong. God cannot be for and against the same thing at the same time. In the present civil war it is quite possible that God's purpose is something different from the purpose of either party; and yet the human instrumentalities, working just as they do, are of the best adaptation to effect his purpose.
Сторінка 46 - This morning, as for some days past, it seems exceedingly probable that this Administration will not be re-elected. Then it will be my duty to so cooperate with the President-elect, as to save the Union between the election and the inauguration ; as he will have secured his election on such ground that he cannot possibly save it afterwards.
Сторінка 208 - I claim not to have controlled events, but confess plainly that events have controlled me. Now, at the end of three years' struggle, the nation's condition is not what either party or any man devised or expected.

Посилання на книгу

Про автора (2002)

Ronald C. White Jr. is professor of American Intellectual and Religious History at San Francisco Theological Seminary, as well as the author and editor of five books. He lives in La Cañada, California.

Бібліографічна інформація