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of Gronovius whether they were genuin or not; and therefore he might as well confess the truth himself, which would be known in a little time without his

confefsion. He acknowledged that he had himself 3 composed several verses, which he had quoted as from + Grotius. I inquired particularly after those verses so nearly resembling that passage in Milton,

Better to reign in Hell, than serve in Heaven: and he confessed that he had made those very verses, and indeed all which had any particular likeness to any thing in Milton. I expressed my suspicions likewife about Masenius, especially as he had lost the book so long ago, and as Mr. Douglas had proved that one of his quotations from Masenius, consisting of cight lines, (which I have cited likewise in a note on X. 710.) was taken litterally from the Latin translation of the Paradise Lost by Hogæus; and it was not probable that the fame eight lines should be in Hogæus, and in Masenius too. He owned honestly that they were not, nor several things which he had ascribed to Masenius. I asked particularly whether the word Pandæmonium was in Masenius, for I had all along suspected that it was not, Concilium inferorum five Pandemonium: and he acknowledged that it was an interpolation of his own. I questioned whether Masenius had enumerated the four blind poets, Tiresias, Phineus, Thamyrisque, et magnus Homerus: and he answered that there was some foundation for that; Masenius had reckoned up three of them, and he had inserted the fourth : and commonly I found,

that

that when he had caused any thing to be printed in capital letters or Italic characters, as worthy of the peculiar notice and observation of his readers, that was interpolated and forged by himself. Well might Mr. Lauder select this verfe for the motto to his book,

Things unattempted yet in prose or rhime; for tho' there have been frequent forgeries in the litterary world, yet such as these I believe not only were never practiced before, but' were never at'tempted: but

aliter non fit, Avite, liber he had recourse to these artifices, as he himself confesses, because he plainly perceived that he could not otherwise have proved his point to the satisfaction of any body. But I forbear to aggravate matters. I would not inflame the reader's indignation. The 'man has already been sufficiently exposed, and expresses forrow for his offense, and promises to make a public recantation acknowledging his crimes, and begging pardon of the world: and tho he has entirely ruined his character, as a man of probity; yet it must be faid for him, that he has given some proofs of his abilities, as a man of learning.

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THOMAS NEWTON,

December 5.

1750

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877
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Book Line
Aron and Mofes, their mission to Egypt

xii
Abdiel (a Seraph) opposes Satan promoting the
Angels revolt, &c.

}
Reply to his answer
His fidelity, &c. celebrated
Retreat from Satan's party

vi

1
Soliloquy on view of him at their head

vi

114
Speech to him thereon

vi

130
Reply to his answer

vi

171
Encounters him in the battel

vi 189
Vanquishes Ariel, Arioc and Ramiel, (fallen Angels) vi

369
Abel and Cain, their story related

xi

429
Abrabam's and the patriarchs

xii

113
All nations his sons by faith

xii

446
Acheron, a river of hell

ii
Adam and Eve described generally

570
iv

288
particularly iv

295
iv

312

492
Their state of innocence

iy

211
303

510

Vide Innocence.
Night orison

iv

720
Morning orison

153
Preparations to entertain the Angel Raphael

3.13
The table and entertainment deicrib'd

V

391
Their nuptial bed

iv

708
Nuptials celebrated

510
Parting preceding the temptation

ix 385
Behaviour after their fall

ix

IC04
Find themselves naked
Make themselves breeches of fig-leaves
Recriminate on, and reproach each other
Hide themselves from God (the Son)
Appearance before him

109
Repentance

x 1098
Expulsion from Paradise

xii

625

Vide Similes.
VOL. II.
* A a a

Adam,

738

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ix 1051
ix 1099
ix 1187

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Book Line Adam, his discourse with Eve on the prohibition of the

411 Tree of Knowledge To her at night

iv 610 Answer to her question about the nightly luminaries iv 660 Viewing her sleeping

8 Answer to her relating her dream, (the subject of Satan's

94 first illufive temptation) To her weeping

129 Invites the Angel Raphael to his bower, &c.

361 Discourse with him

400 Continued on various subjects

viii

651

Vide Rapbael. His creation and dominion, &c. over the creatures

ix

524 vji

542 Prohibited the Tree of Knowledge

vui

332 Account of himself, and objects about him, &c. on

viii

253 his creation Of his first view of the Divine Presence, instation in

viji

311 Paradise, &c. Speech to God thereon, and on his folitude there viii

357 Reply to God's answer

379 Sleep on the formation of Eve describ'd

viii 451 His first view of her

481 Passion for her

visi

521 Valediction to Raphael

viii 644

from 203 Discourfe with Eve preceding the temptation (on Satan's subtilty, and the means to resist it, &c.)

to 384 Care, and fears for her in absence

ix 838 Meets her returning with the forbidden fruit

ix 847 Soliloquy lamenting her transgreflion

ix 896 Resolves to die with her

ix 907 Speech to her thereon

ix

921 Eats the forbidden fruit

ix 996

1011 Incites her to carnal fruition (the first effect of it) The place, &c. described

ix 1037 After speech to her on their fall and nakedness

ix 1067 Another, charging her as the aggressor

ix 1132 Reply to her answer (recriminates her affected self

ix 1162 fufficiency, &'c.) Anfwer to God (the Son) calling him to judgment х 115 Reply to him (accufes Eve)

x 124 The sentence pronounced on him

х Soliloquy thereon

х 720 continued

x

854 Wishes

ix

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ix

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746

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from 450

Wishes for his dissolution

771 Reflections on the immortality of the foul, &c.

782 Repulsory speech to Eve attempting to consolate him 866 Relents towards her

937 Reply to her (accusing herself as the first in tranfgref

947 fion) Answer (to her reply advising to die by their own

1013 hands) Resolves the contrary, (submission to God's will, and

1028 repentance) Speech to Eve (on the efficacy of prayer, &c.)

xi

140 Hails her the mother of mankind

xi 158 Speech to her on the Omens preceding their expulfion } xi

193 from Paradise On the view of Michael approaching

xi 226 Behaviour on receiving the message

xi 263 Speech to Michael thereon

xi

295 Refignation

xi

370 Discourse with Michael, discovering to him in vision what

xi should happen in the world till the food

to 867

from 61 Discourse with him, relating what should happen to the

xii
general resurrection
General deply to hima (refolutions of future obedience, { xii 552

God's providence,
Vide Eve. Vide Michael. Vide Raphael.

Vide Similes,
Adonis a River in Syria

i

450 Adramala, and Asmadai, fall’n Angels, wounded, and put } vi 365

to Air first clouded on Adam's fall

xi 182 Allufions,

Vide Similes.

iii Amarant, a flower transplanted from Paradise to Heaven ; Ambition censured

ü 482 A cause of Satan's fall

iy 86 Angels (Cæleftial) obey God of choice, not necessity

535 Imbattel'd against 'Satan, and the fall'n Angel

vi

15 Their signal, and march

56 Signal to engage, and engagement

vi 202 Prevail

vi Disposition to re-ingage

vi

524 Retreat

vi

597 Rally again, and renew the fight

vi * Aa a ?

Their

to 551

352

386

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634

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