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645

Free in thine own arbitrement it lies.
Perfect within, no outward aid require ;
And all temptation to transgress repel.

So saying, he arose; whom Adam thus
Follow'd with benediction. Since to part,
Go heav'nly Guest, ethereal Messenger,
Sent from whose sovran goodness I adore.
Gentle to me and affable hath been
Thy condescension, and shall be honor'd ever
With grateful memory: thou to mankind
Be good and friendly still, and oft return.

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644. — whom Adam thus] Adam's this sense therefore it is not improper speech at parting with the Angel to be used towards superiors. But has in it a deference and gratitude what ftile is that (says the Doctor) agreeable to an inferior nature, and Since to part? It means, Since we at the same time a certain dignity are to part. If the expression is aband greatness suitable to the father breviated, so was the time of Raof mankind in his state of innocence. phael's stay with Adam. He was

Addison. just upon the point of going, and 645. Follow'd with benedi&tion. therefore Adam might choose bre

Since to part,] What's here? vity of speech, that he might express says Dr. Bentley: Adam give bene. all he had to say before the Archdiction, his blessing to an Arch. Angel withdrew himielf. No need Angel, when the lefs is blefed of the then for Dr. Bentley's emendation betier ? But benediction does not fig- of this fort, nify blessing here in the sense which

Follow'd with valedition, loath to the Doctor gives to the word. Be

part.

Pearce. common phrate in religious offices. Benediction here is not blefling, as 'tis And so in a lower sepse men may

usually understood, but well speakbe said to bless Angels; for bere ing, thanks. So Milton has explain'd diction is (properly ipeaking) only

the word Parad. Reg. III. 127. giving them good words, or wishing Glory and benediction, that is chem well. See Pial. CIX. 17. In

thanks. Rickardfon.

652. Se

So parted they, the Angel up to Heaven From the thick shade, and Adam to his bower.

652. So parted they, the Angel up lead on then where thy bower to Heaven

O'ershades From tbe thick pade, and Adam to

So to the sylvan lodge bis bower.] It is very true, They came. as Dr. Bentley says, that this conversation between Adam and the But by bower in this place is meant Angel was held in the bower. For his inmost bower, as it is callid in chither Adam had invited him. IV. 738. his place of rest. There V. 367.

was a shady walk that led to Adam's Vouchsafe with us in yonder feady 644. Adam follow'd bim into this

bower. When the Angel arose ver. bower

Tady walk : and it was from this To reft.

thick hade that they parted, and And the Angel had accepted the the Angel went up to Heaven, and invitation, ver. 375.

Adam to his bower.

The end of the Eighth Book.

645

Free in thine own arbitrement it lies.
Perfect within, no outward aid require ;
And all temptation to transgress repel.

So saying, he arose; whom Adam thus
Follow'd with benediction. Since to part,
Go heav'nly Guest, ethereal Messenger,
Sent from whose sovran goodness I adore.
Gentle to me and affable hath been
Thy condescension, and shall be honor'd ever
With grateful memory: thou to mankind
Be good and friendly still, and oft return.

650

So

644. - whom Adam thus] Adam's this sense therefore it is not improper speech at parting with the Angel to be used towards superiors. But has in it a deference and gratitude what stile is that (says the Doctor) agreeable to an inferior nature, and since to part? It means, Since we at the same time a certain dignity are to part. If the expression is aband greatness suitable to the father breviated, so was the time of Raof mankind in his state of innocence. phael's stay with Adam. He was

Addison. just upon the point of going, and 645. Follow'd with benediction. therefore Adam might chooie bre

Since to part,] What's here? vity of speech, that he might express says Dr. Bentley: Adam give bene. all he had to say before the Archdiction, his blessing to an Arch. Angel withdrew himlelf. No need Angel, when the less is blessed of the then for Dr. Bentley's emendation betier ? But benediction does not sig. of this fort, nify blesing here in the sense which

Follow'd with valediction, loath to the Doctor gives to the word. Be

Pearce. 1:e dicere Domino, to bless God is a Benediction here is not blessing, as 'tis

part. common phrate in religious offices. usually understood, but well speak: And so in a lower sense men may be faid to blefs Angels; for bene. ing, thanks. So Milton has explaind diction is (properly ipeaking) only the word Parad. Reg. III. 127. giving them good words, or wishing Glory and benediction, that is chem well. See Pial. CIX. 17. In thanks.

Rickardjon.

652. So

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'Twixt day and night, and now from end to end Night's hemisphere had veil'd th' horizon round: When Satan who late fled before the threats

Of Gabriel out of Eden, now improv'd I

In E the poet did very well in taking whole Æneid, and has given offense = notice of it. The historian above to several critics, may be accounted E mention'd acquaints us, a prophetefs for the same way: Virgil himself, E had foretold Æneas, that he Mould before he begins that relation, preE take his voyage westward, till his mises, that what he was going to

companions should eat their tables ; tell appeared incredible, but that it

and that accordingly, upon his land- was justified by tradition. What F ing in Italy, as they were eating farther confirms me that this change

their flesh upon cakes of bread, for of the fleet was a celebrated circumwant of other conveniencies, they stance in the history of Æneas is, afterwards fed on the cakes them that Ovid has given a place to the felves; upon which one of the com- fame metamorphosis in his account pany said merrily, We are eating our of the Heathen mythology. None tables. They immediately took the of the critics I have met with hint, says the historian, and concluded having considered the fable of the

the prophecy to be fulfillid. As Æneid in this light, and taken noE Virgil did not think it proper to tice how the tradition, on which it

omit so material a particular in the was founded, authorizes those parts 5

history of Æneas, it may be worth in it which appear most exceptionawhile to consider with how much ble; I hope the length of this rejudgment he has qualified it, and flection will not make it unacceptable

takes off every thing that might to the curious part of my readers. - have appeared improper for a pal- The history, which was the basis of

fage in an heroic poem. The pro- Milcon's poem, is still shorter than

phetess who foretells it is an hungry either that of the Iliad or Æneid. = Harpy, as the person who discovers The poet has likewise taken care to it is young Ascanius :

insert every circumstance of it in Heus etiam menfas consumimus, in- the body of his fable. The ninth quit lülus.

book, which we are here to consider,

is raised upon that brief account in Such an observation, which is beau- Scripture, wherein we are told that tiful in the mouth of a boy, would the Serpent was more subtle than have been ridiculous from any other any beast of the field, that he tempted of the company. I am apt to think the woman to eat of the forbidden that the changing of the Trojan fruit, that she was overcome by this fleet into water-nymphs, which is temptation, and that Adam followed the most violent machine in the her example. From these few par

ticulars,

I 2

Satan having compass’d the Earth, with meditated

guile returns as a mist by night into Paradise, enters into the serpent sleeping. Adam and Eve in the morning go forth to their labors, which Eve

proposes to divide in several places, each laboring apart : Adam consents not, alledging the danger, left that enemy, of whom they were forewarn’d, should attempt her found alone: Eve loath to be thought not circumspect or firm enough, urges her going apart,

the rather desirous to make trial of her strength; Adam at last yields: The Serpent finds her alone; his subtle approach, first gazing, then speaking, with much fattery extolling Eve above all other creatures. Eve wond'ring to hear the Serpent speak, asks how he attain’d to human speech and such understanding not till now; the Serpent answers, that by tasting of a certain tree in the garden he attain'd both to speech and reason, till then void of both: Eve requires him to bring her to that tree, and finds it to be the tree of knowledge forbidden: The Serpent now grown bolder, with many wiles and arguments induces her at length to eat; she pleas'd with the taste deliberates a while whether to impart thereof to Adam or not, at last brings him of the fruit, relates what

persuaded her to eat thereof: Adam at first amaz’d, but perceiving her lost, resolves through vehemence of love to perish with her ; and extenuating the trespass eats also of the fruit: The effects thereof in them both; they seek to cover their nakedness; then fall to variance and accusation of one another.

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