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28.–SAINT SIMON AND SAINT JUDE, Apostles.

Simon is called the Canaanite, from the Hebrew word Cana, to be zealous; hence his name of Simon, Zelotes, or the Zealot, Luke vi, 15. After enduring various troubles and afflictions, he, with great cheerfulness, suffered death on the cross.

Jude is called both by the name of Thaddæus and Libbæus; Matt. x, 3, and Mark iii, 18. Jude, the brother of James : Jude, verse 1. And Judas, not Iscariot: John xiv, 22. He was of our Lord's kindred; ' Is not his mother called Mary, and his brethren James and Joses, and Simon and Judas ? Matt. xii, 55. After great success in his apostolic ministry, he was, at last, for a free and open reproof of the superstitious rites of the Magi, cruelly put to death. He has left one epistle of universal concern to Christians. .

*_1820.-H. FRANCISCO DIED, ÆT. 134! At Whitehall, near New York, in the United States. He was a native of England, and emigrated about 80 or 90 years since: he officiated as a drummer at the coronation of Queen Anne.

* Astronomical Occurrences

In OCTOBER 1822.

SOLAR PHENOMENA. The Sun enters Scorpio at 49 m. after 7 in the evening of the 22d of this month; and he rises and sets, on certain days, during the same period, as in the following

TABLE of the Sun's Rising and Setting for every fifth Day. October 18t, Sun rises at 12 m. after 6. Sets 48 m. past 5

6th, • • • • 22 - · 6 · · 38 . . 5
11th, • • 32 · · 6 - · 28 · · 5
16th, · · · - 42 · · 6 · · 18 · · 5
21st. . . . . 51 . - 6 . 9 -
26th, • • • • 1 •. 7 • - 59 ry-
31st, . .

. 10 . . . . 50.

5

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Equation of Time. When apparent time is known, either from a dial, or by any other means, subtract the numbers in the following table, and the remainders will be the mean time at the same instant. TABLE.

m. 8. ??: Tuesday Oct. 1st, from the time by the dial subt. 10 12 Sunday : 6th, : ...

- - • - - - - - 11 44 Friday: ... 11th, ...

• • . 13 6 - Wednesday - 16th, · · · · · · · - 14 16 Monday - - 21st,

15 u Saturday · · 26th, · ·

• 15 51 Thursday •' . 31st, ..

16 12
LUNAR PHENOMENA.

Phases of the Moon.
Last Quarter 7th day, at 44 m. past 3 in the afternoon
New Moon 15th 32 .. 1 in the morning

First Quarter 23d, - - 48 . 5. - - - - - .. 4 Full Moon, 30th, • • 41 . .. 9 - - - -

Moon's Passage over the Meridian. Such of our readers as wish to observe the passage of the Moon over the first meridian in this month, may do it at the following times, if the weather be favourable : viz. ! October 7th, at 46 m. after 5 in the morning

8th, - 45 - - - 6 - - -

9th, - 40. . - 7. - - - -
: : 10th, - 30- -- 8-- -
1 22d, . 54 - - -

the evening
. . ., 23d, - 4S.

24th, • 29 -
25th. . 15 - - - - - - - -
26th, - 1 - - - 9 -

27th, - 48 - - . 9 - - -
. , 28th,. - 37 -:- - 10 - - - . .

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- PHENOMENA PLANETARUM.

.. . Phases of Venus. This beautiful planet will appear like a full Moon

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during the whole of this month, at the commencement of which the proportion of her phases will be, to SIlluminated part = 11.29557

= 0•77443

Oct. 1st

Dark part

Eclipses of Jupiter's Satellites. The following twelve eclipses of these small bodies will be visible this month : viz.

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ist Satellite, 7th day, at 56 m. after 3 in the morning
is 8th - 24 . 10 at night

15th - . 18 . after midnight
1 230 : - 12:. - 2 in the morning
24th

-: 8 in the evening
Soth

. - 4 in the morning
318t - - 34 - - 10 at night
2d Satellite, 1st

10- • -
8th
16th - - 33 - - 3 in the morning
23d

6- - • • .
26th · · 28 · · 7 at night

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after midnight

Form of Saturn's Ring. .: The following are the proportionate diameters of this. singular phenomenon at the beginning of this month: viz." October 1st. | Transverse axis = 1.000

Po l Conjugate axis =-0.373

: Other Phenomena. The Moon will be in conjunction with B in Taurus at 36 m. after 11 at night of the 5th of this month ; with a in Leo at 49 m. after 8 in the evening of the 10th; and with in Scorpio at 52 m. past 8 in the evening of the 18th; Mercury will attain his greatest elongation on the 13th, and will be stationary on the 24th ; Saturn will also be in opposition at 30 m. past 3 in the afternoon of the 30th.

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The Naturalist's Diary

For OCTOBER 1822.
It is a noisy morning: yet the sky
Looks down as bright as on a summer's day.
The ocean, curling as in wanton play,
Doth bare her bosom to Apollo's eye,
And ev'ry whispering wind that flutters by
Seems like a spirit charged to greet the day,
And duly hurries towards the East-away :
For there the Sun, seen o'er the mountains high,
Comes smiling on the World. The fruit, the flower,
Earth, heaven, the sea, and oh! the heart of man,
And all that comes within His mighty plan,
Fling back the glance in joy: and from her bower
The Spirit of Meditation comes, to see

All nature join in social jubilee. BARRY CORNWALL. As the spring and summer seasons have their distinguishing excellencies, so it is, in an especial manner, with respect to AUTUMN. The reviving freshness of the Spring is long past, and the Summer is declining; Autumn succeeds, and its rich blessings may be considered as pleasing to the sight and gratifying to the palate. The general state of the weather, indeed, towards the close of Autumn has a tendency to revive the natural spirits of those whose constitutions have been debilitated by the preceding heats. The air becomes more temperate, and the mornings, as the poet has described them, are fresh and invigorating ;—the evenings, too, like those in September, are frequently serene and pleasant. Sometimes, indeed, in wet and changeful seasons like that of the present year (1821), October is the finest month of the whole twelve; and, while we are now writing, we have a striking example of this fact, in the bright autumnal days which have so peculiarly distinguished this season. The groves now lose their leafy honours; but before they are entirely tarnished, an adventitious beauty, arising from that gradual decay which loosens the withering leaf, gilds the autumnal landscape with a temporary splendour, superior to the verdure of spring or the luxuriance of summer. •

An AUTUMNAL SKETCH.
Through forests' paths, o'er-strewed with rustling leaves,

OCTOBER conies, to deck the fading year,
And of its spoil a varied chaplet weaves,
Ere long to hang on pallid Autumn's bier.

The dew-drop on his brow congeals,

His golden locks the wood-bļast steals;
The scattering wind his cliequered mantle rends,
And o'er his form the tempest cloud impends.
Pale are the flowers that thinly plant his way,

The gelid drops o'ercharged their closing bells;
Their tissued wardrobe falls in quick decay,
And nightly cold their blushing grace dispels;

Their drooping heads the frost-star gems;

The whirlwind shakes their pensile stems: Their transient bloom they shortly must resign, And with their relics mark the year's decline

The purple-vested Morn her hour delays,

And lingering seems with doubtful mien to rise;
Gold-sceptered Day a shortened visit pays,
Aud Night with raven crest usurps the skies.

With early beam, the vesper-star

Flames on Twilight's misty car;
And swiftly to the chambers of the west
The crimson-curtained Evening sinks to rest. .
In wizard forms the dusky vapours float,

And veil the woodlands in their dun disguise;
The robin trills his solitary note,
And tunes in warbling plaint his elegies;

The orphan beauties of the year

In melancholy train appear;
Pay their last mournful tribute to its shade,
And o'er its desolated ruins fade
For soon the wheels of WINTER's icy car.

Shall crush these fragments of the shattered year;
Ev'n now, his hollow nurmurs far
Proclaim the fury of his empire drear ;

The echoing blast his herald blows,

His meteor torch blue-tinctured glows;
For Nature's sleep he weaves a snowy vest,
And soon shall rock her languid frame to rest.
The curled leaf fitting on the blast,

The moaning gale, the shadowy sky,
Denote the Sun's dominion past,
And shades of northern darkness vigh;

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