The Merry Wives of Windsor

Simon and Schuster, 23 . 2011 . - 320 .
Shakespeares merry wives are Mistress Ford and Mistress Page of the town of Windsor. The two play practical jokes on Mistress Fords jealous husband and a visiting knight, Sir John Falstaff.

Merry wives, jealous husbands, and predatory knights were common in a kind of play called citizen comedy or city comedy. In such plays, courtiers, gentlemen, or knights use social superiority to seduce citizens wives.

The Windsor wives, though, do not follow that pattern. Instead, Falstaffs offer of himself as lover inspires their torment of him. Falstaff responds with the same linguistic facility that Shakespeare gives him in the history plays in which he appears, making him the hero of the play for many audiences.

The authoritative edition of The Merry Wives of Windsor from The Folger Shakespeare Library, the trusted and widely used Shakespeare series for students and general readers, includes:

-The exact text of the printed book for easy cross-reference
-Hundreds of hypertext links for instant navigation
-Freshly edited text based on the best early printed version of the play
-Full explanatory notes conveniently placed on pages facing the text of the play
-Scene-by-scene plot summaries
-A key to the plays famous lines and phrases
-An introduction to reading Shakespeares language
-An essay by a leading Shakespeare scholar providing a modern perspective on the play
-Fresh images from the Folger Shakespeare Librarys vast holdings of rare books
-An annotated guide to further reading

Essay by Natasha Korda

The Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, DC, is home to the worlds largest collection of Shakespeares printed works, and a magnet for Shakespeare scholars from around the globe. In addition to exhibitions open to the public throughout the year, the Folger offers a full calendar of performances and programs. For more information, visit Folger.edu.
 

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LibraryThing Review

  - seaward - LibraryThing

The Fourth Folio in turn served as the base for the series of eighteenth-century editions of Shakespeare's plays. Nicholas Rowe used the Fourth Folio text as the foundation of his 1709 edition, and ...

LibraryThing Review

  - meandmybooks - LibraryThing

Not really my sort of thing, but Merry Wives is so much better than some of the other comedies I've read this year (Loves Labour's Lost, The Two Gentlemen of Verona, The Comedy of Errors), that I'm ...

Editors Preface
ix
The Merry Wives of Windsor
xiii
The Merry Wives of Windsor
xiv
Shakespeares Life
xxvi
Shakespeares Theater
xxxv
The Publication of Shakespeares Plays
xliv
An Introduction to This Text
xlviii
Text of the Play with Commentary
1
ACT 3 Scene 4
117
ACT 3 Scene 5
125
ACT 4 Scene 1
139
ACT 4 Scene 2
143
ACT 4 Scene 3
157
ACT 4 Scene 4
159
ACT 4 Scene 5
165
ACT 4 Scene 6
173

ACT 1 Scene 1
7
ACT 1 Scene 2
25
ACT 1 Scene 3
27
ACT 1 Scene 4
33
ACT 2 Scene 1
47
ACT 2 Scene 2
61
ACT 2 Scene 3
79
ACT 3 Scene 1
89
ACT 3 Scene 2
97
ACT 3 Scene 3
103
ACT 5 Scene 1
181
ACT 5 Scene 2
183
ACT 5 Scene 4
185
ACT 5 Scene 5
187
Longer Notes
205
Textual Notes
215
A Modern Perspective
227
Further Reading
241
Key to Famous Lines and Phrases
263

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 (2011)

William Shakespeare was born in April 1564 in the town of Stratford-upon-Avon, on Englands Avon River. When he was eighteen, he married Anne Hathaway. The couple had three childrenan older daughter Susanna and twins, Judith and Hamnet. Hamnet, Shakespeares only son, died in childhood. The bulk of Shakespeares working life was spent in the theater world of London, where he established himself professionally by the early 1590s. He enjoyed success not only as a playwright and poet, but also as an actor and shareholder in an acting company. Although some think that sometime between 1610 and 1613 Shakespeare retired from the theater and returned home to Stratford, where he died in 1616, others believe that he may have continued to work in London until close to his death.