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shall return more brilliant in appearance than ever, and as irresistible in our attacks upon the beauties of the Steyne, as the Hussars are superior to all his Majesty's other troops, cavalry or infantry. I hope, if Anglesea comes stumping here with his Cossacks (as they say he wishes) in search of a campaign, that he will do us the favour to leave us behind him till the gloss is worn off our new fits.

Will you be kind enough to ask my cousin Sabi, with my best compliments, or any other more prevailing mode of solicitation, if she will desire her millinery woman to send me six dozen of white silk pocket handkerchiefs. They must have a narrow gold border, one fourth of an inch wide, according to regimental regulation. We have agreed unanimously to adopt them as more elegant, and at the same time more agreeable in the use, than any others; and it becomes every gentleman in the army to patronize them, if it be only for their effect on the skin. S- says they are like the conferences we used to have in Park Lane, at Lady Mary V-s, both mollifying and amiable. We are highly entertained with the disputation between Harriet Wilson and her friend, Julia Johnstone. The Hon. C-P— who has been, as you know, appointed our chaplain, calls it the “Stews-arian controversy." I do not clearly comprehend his meaning in using that term, for he said, in his sermon last Sunday, that the “arian" was a heresy, and he seemed disposed to rub it down at a great rate; but what has arianism got to do with the two girls ? I never heard they were deemed otherwise than orthodox in their belief, though perhaps a little wanting in good works.

I've cut dead with Lucy Drummond, so you may be perfectly easy in that affair. I loved her from my soul, and should never have got over my melancholy, if the mess had not invited a numerous party the next day, and if I hadn't (being at the bottom of the table) caught a cursed head-ache that made me think of nothing else ; she was a devilish fine animal, notwithstanding, and my taste is still unimpeachable. Col. D-, of ours, says that her beauty and symmetry are first-rate, and her paces admirable. I gave up my prospect of happiness with her more in conformity to regimental opinion than my own. You know I am open and candid.

Chiboque, a new cornet of ours, was the first to advise me to cut the concern; for both he and Lord A- declare they saw her eat Cheshire cheese—ay, downright Cheshire! at a ball and supper we gave the other day. Think of this in the wife of an officer of his Majesty's Hussars. Lord Un too declares he saw her malting the same evening, but would not tell me of it at the time, out of regard to my feelings. Think, think! my dear sir, of such a beautiful creature as Lucy Drummond drinking porter ! Poh! Thus your fears of my marrying Lucy without a fortune may be now dissipated. It has been proposed at the mess, that we shall none of us marry any but women of title and family. I am inclined to think there will be a dissentient or two among us on this point : G--- swears it originated with the Colonel, to get off his daughters ; for he complained the other day, that all the young sprigs of nobility were neglecting their equals for actresses and singing-girls, and that girls of rank were left cursedly on hand. Can it be wondered at, when they are drilled for the market so openly by their mammas, that a dog without a nose might smell out the trick ? Keeping-wares they are, and ever will be, though it is not their own faults. Geswore the other day he'd be most particularly d-d” (our regulation oath,) if he assented to this proposal. He even hinted he would first sell out of the regiment.

The next time you hear from me, will be on your side the water ; and I look with great pleasure to the time of gazing again at the thick ancles on the Steyne, and shaking you heartily by the hand to declare to you how truly

Dear Sir,

I am,

P. S. My bay charger is dead of the staggers. If a neat cab. comes in your way, pray purchase it for me, as I shall sell my present jarvey on my arrival in town; the bog-trotting country has foundered it past hope of repair.

No. XVII.

Broad Street Buildings, 17th May, 1825. Dear Sir,

You have been misinformed as to the great advance in all articles of West India produce, the prices being now very little better than when you last favoured us with a call in the City. There was, indeed, a sudden rise both in these and in spices of all sorts, occasioned by speculators in the money-market, who having now realised their profits, have left their incautious imitators to pay the smart-money. Although we have received no sugars from your estates in Grenada, since the arrival of the Friend's Adventure, Captain Hacklestone, we shall have pleasure in complying with your request, and have accordingly lodged a credit for you at our banker's, on whom your drafts to the amount of 30001.-say three thousand pounds,- will meet due honour. This sum we shall place to the debit of the Palmiste estate.

It is not very easy to answer your question as to the effect likely to be produced in the City by the late alteration of the duties on manufactured articles and raw materials, as some months must elapse before the experiment can be fairly tried, and in the mean time people speak of the new regulations as they have affected their own immediate interests. Almost every body had speculated upon the expected changes; those who have made money in consequence, eulogize Mr. Huskisson to the skies, while the losers condemn his judgment in that particular article wherein he has disappointed their calculations. There seem, certainly, to be some just grounds of complaint ; for the growers of Cape wine, who from particular exemptions in point of duty were encouraged to embark considerable capital in the business, have not been considered in the late reductions, and are told, in answer to their complaint, that when they learn to grow a better wine, they will be enabled to raise the price!

For our own parts, we not only think the new regulations likely to prove highly advantageous to the country in general, but shall be glad to see the same principle extended to agricultural produce, protected by a moderate duty, so as to preserve us from that mischievous seesaw of prices occasioned by an alternation between total restriction and open ports. Mr. Huskisson is certainly a very superior man; and in nothing has he shown a more enlightened mind than in liberating the bonded foreign corn, whereby several thousand quarters of our own, which we bought upon speculation several years ago, will at length be brought into the market.

We have, however, our City Lord Chancellors, who pique themselves upon their adherence to things as they have been, because they have been; and, like an illustrious Duke in our own country, and the enlightened king Ferdinand in another, declare, with all due solemnity, that they will continue to be as ignorant as they always have been, so help them God! These gentry expect the great wheel of time to stand still, because they don't know how to wind up their own stupid little -watches ! Our Common Council sages of this stamp shake their heads, and recall the good days of Mr. Vansittart, who so short a time ago, when these very measures were pressed upon his attention by the Opposition, pronounced them to be visionary and revolutionary, and fraught with convulsion and ruin to the country :—and then they very profoundly observe, that there cannot be much difference between his time and Mr. Huskisson’s. Perhaps not; but there may be a marvellous one between the two heads. Poor Van ! how must he, and such blind sticklers for antiquity as the chancellor, be horror-stricken at these radical innovations !

Having thus, to the best of our ability, complied with your request, we beg to inclose your account current to this day, leaving a balance in our favour, after charging you the three thousand pounds, of 5625l. 13s. 11 1-4d. which is carried to your debit in the new account, and of which you will please to acknowledge the receipt in conformity.

We are, dear Sir,
Your obedient humble servants,

and Co.

the

No. XVIII.
SIR,

Frant, Sussex, 22d May. Your Gothic cottage at this place is going on rapidly; the floorings to the first story all laid. Went over yesterday to Eridge Castle, and saw Lord Abergavenny's bailiff, who has given us leave to fill up small pond, and inclose the bit of ground beyond the paddock. Don't at all agree, Sir, that we shouldn't carry it a story higher, as always intended : much better come down yourself, and you 'll say same as I do. Know I am only a builder, a practical man, and never went to Greece and Italy, which I always thought a great humbug, for what suits them can't suit us, because of the difference of climate. As well espect us to wear the same clothes. I could have staid at home and built a better church than the new one in Regent Street, which they tell me is copied from one abroad. I never went to Rome or Athens, but when I build an Opera house wall, it shall stand its ground; and when I get the job of a new Custom-house, I shall make my arches rest upon the tops of the piles, and not between them, so as to bring down my building in three or four years. None of the new public buildings in London high enough. Look at the Board of Trade in Whitehall, which they have attempted to heighten by two balustrades at top. Like a dwarf with two cocked hats upon his head : don't look a bit the taller. New wall of the Bank just as bad: pillars very well, because they are only copies ; but look at the top. Little carved squares, and little odd triangles. All little and avgular : makes your

eyes ache to gaze at them. Understand the builder gives lectures upon architecture which are very clever. Dare say he understands every thing except the practice, while I know every thing except the theory: think I have the best of it.

Shall go on with second story unless I hear from you to the contrary. Meantime please send a bank post bill per return for same amount as last, as there is no more money at the Wells banking house. Can't go on clearing the ground beyond the paddock for want of hands, as the men are all out setting up the hop-poles, but no delay in the building. Hoping you 'll soon come down, am, Sir, yours to command,

LONDON LYRICS.

The Troo Sisters.
BORN of a widow tall and dark,

Whose head-piece ne'er at whist errs :
Where York Gate guards the Regent's Park,

There dwelt two loving Sisters.
Gertrude, ere twelve years old, would quote

John Locke, and took to wisdum :
Emma (I happen well to know 't)

On all such topics is dumb.
The stars that gem yon vaulted dome

Are swept by Gertrude's besom ;
Emma, unless when driving home

From Almack's, never sees 'em.
Gertrude o'er Werner's Scale will run

Slate, limestone, quartz, and granite,
And name the strata, one by one,

That coat our zig-zag planet.
But Emma, bent on ball or rout,

Soon of such converse weary is,
And even nothing knows about

The 0-o-litic Series.
Gertrude, unmoved by doubt a jot,

Knows from the " Sketch” of Evans
What dwarfs in faith descend, and what

Tall Titans scale the heavens.
The grand piano Emma greets

With fingers light and plastic ;
But never like her sister beats

The drum ecclesiastic.
That, dipp'd in blue, with lofty air

Men's would-be Queen discovers :
This, dress'd in white, seems not to care

If men prove foes or lovers.
'Twixt sense and folly free to choose,

So different, so unequal,
Can man dwell long in doubt? My Muse

With wonder sings the sequel !
Darts oft times fly of merit wide-

(So wills the purblind urchin)
Emma, light Emma, blooms a bride,

And Gertrude fades a virgin !

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