The Grammar of Social Relations: The Major Essays of Louis Schneider

Transaction Publishers, 1984 - 369 .

This collection of the writings of Louis Schneider, an exceptionally gifted sociologist of religion the history of ideas, provides a sensitive but rigorous view of the place of ideas in social life. DiÂvided according to the principal areas in which Schneider conÂducted researchâ history of social thought, principles of social theÂory, sociology of religionâ are esÂsays on evolution, styles of reÂsearch, and moral choice in human relations. His knowledge of systems of thoughtâ dialecÂtical, functional, and phenomenologicalâ was peerless. The unifying theme in his work is the place of cultural formations in soÂcial structures; as a result, his writings are alive with persons no less than systems.

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V
19
VI
31
VII
49
VIII
77
IX
97
X
115
XI
127
XII
149
XVI
231
XVII
249
XVIII
251
XIX
263
XX
271
XXI
289
XXII
307
XXIII
329

XIII
161
XIV
183
XV
209
XXIV
337

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59 - Every individual is continually exerting himself to find out the most advantageous employment for whatever capital he can command. It is his own advantage, indeed, and not that of society, which he has in view. But the study of his own advantage naturally or, rather, necessarily leads him to prefer that employment which is most advantageous to the society.
139 - By preferring the support of domestic to that of foreign industry, he intends only his own security ; and by directing that industry in such a manner as its produce may be of the greatest value, he intends only his own gain; and he is in this, as in many other cases, led by an invisible hand to promote an end which was no part of his intention.
66 - People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices.
61 - With the greater part of rich people, the chief enjoyment of riches consists in the parade of riches, which in their eye is never so complete as when they appear to possess those decisive marks of opulence which nobody can possess but themselves.
61 - To be observed, to be attended to, to be taken notice of with sympathy, complacency, and approbation, are all the advantages which we can propose to derive from it. It is the vanity, not the ease, or the pleasure, which interests us.
67 - No society can surely be flourishing and happy, of which the far greater part of the members are poor and miserable. It is but equity, besides, that they who feed, cloath, and lodge the whole body of the people, should have such a share of the produce of their own labour as to be themselves tolerably well fed, cloathed, and lodged.
70 - In the progress of the division of labour, the employment of the far greater part of those who live by labour, that is, of the great body of the people, comes to be confined to a few very simple operations, frequently to one or two.
53 - ... led by an invisible hand to promote an end which was no part of his intention. Nor is it always the worse for the society that it was no part of it.
51 - The statesman, who should attempt to direct private people in what manner they ought to employ their capitals, would not only load himself with a most unnecessary attention, but assume an authority which could safely be trusted, not only to no single person, but to no council or senate whatever, and which would nowhere be so dangerous as in the hands of a man who had folly and presumption enough to fancy himself fit to exercise it.
67 - Every man, as long as he does not violate the laws of justice, is left perfectly free to pursue his own interest his own way, and to bring both his industry and capital into competition with those of any other man, or order of men.