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LONDON : PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS,

Stamford-street.

CONTENTS OF THE SECOND PART

ORIGINAL PAPERS.

PAGE

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78
83
90
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103
108

The Gurney Papers. By the Author of " Sayings and Doings."
Nos. V., VI., ŅII., and VIII.

1, 153, 305, 443
Lunacy in France. By John Carne, Esq.

15, 166, 455

Sonnet. By Lady Charlotte Bury

22

The Phantom Ship. By Captain Marryat

23, 181, 341, 496

The Lover's Lament

41

A Day in the Neilgherry Hills. By an Old Forest Ranger

Flirtation

53

Scenes in a Country House. No: 11. Old Times and Modern

Times

59, 197

The Ferryman's Daughter:- A Rhine Sketch. By T.C. Grattan, Esq. 71

The Orphans of Castle Menzies. By the Hon. Mrs. Norton

76

Memoir of Miss Landon. (With a Portrait)

Fashionable Fictions. By the Author of " Sayings and Doings”

The Biter Bit

III- Will:-A Charade. By Captain Marryat

Better Never than Late. By the Author of " Paul Pry"

Practical Jokes. By the Author of " Sayings and Doings"

Peter Pindarics. By one of the Authors of “Rejected Addresses.”

1. St. George's Penitentiary.—2. The Penny-wise Age

116

Sewing up the Fogies. By Benson Hill, Esq.

118

The Beau of Byblos. By Alfred Crowquill.

122

The Uninvited One

128

The Reproach. By Mrs. A. Kerr

166

Human Zoology. No. II.-Lions: No. III.-Dogs

175, 483

Martial in London

180, 340

Lines, by a Young Lady

188

Recreations in Natural History

189

The Artist's Portfolio. By the Hon. Mrs. Norton. No. 1.-The

Picture of Sappho

207

A Tiger Hunt on the Neilgherry Hills. By an Old Forest Ranger 47, 208

Christmas Day

215

The Mother's

Revenge. By T.C. Grattan, Esq.

216

Success in Life

226

Memoir of James Smith, Esg. (With a Portrait)

230

Shakspeare in China. By Douglas Jerrold, Esq.

Bibo Perplexed

239

A Cockney Country Gentleman. By the Author of " Paul Pry". 241

The Finished Picture :- A Military Sketch

258

The Perplexity of a Deaf Gentleman

261

The Man in the Macintosh Cape. By J. B. Buckstone, Esq. 265

Jannetje ter Beek. By Alfred Crowquill

272

The Pilgrims .

William the Fourth. (With a Portrait)

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283

297

THE

NEW MONTHLY MAGAZINE.

THE GURNEY PAPERS.-NO. V.

Our dinner progressed, as the Americans say, most propitiously. Wells was in much better spirits than I had expected to find him, considering the recent severe frustration of all his well-laid schenies for Fanny's matrimonial promotion. He did not in the slightest degree allude to the circumstance, probably because my own casé had not entirely slipped his memory, and because any recapitulation of the history of the Lieutenant's wooing might have recalled to my recollection some scenes of a similar character to those which had been recently acted at the Rectory, but which had not been productive of a similar result.

Mrs. Brandyball, whose whole aim and object appeared to be the making everybody round her pleased with themselves, as the readiest mode of making everybody present pleased with her, began her course of experiments in that way by eulogizing, in the best set terms, the gallant officer now absent, as one of the most interesting of his sex.

“ I protest,” said she, “ that I am not like that particular genus of gallinaceous birds whose tenderest sensibilities are awakened by the appearance of sanguineously-coloured cloth, but I cannot so entirely subdue the natural, and I hope not altogether reprehensible sentiment of gratitude which must unquestionably animate every female heart towards our gallant protectors in the time of peril."

" Ah,” said Cuthbert, “ your's is a very amiable weakness in that respect. What soldiers have to endure, -ah, those narchings and countermarchings,-eh?”

“ But,” continued Mrs. Brandyball, determined to win the Rector entirely, “ I never met with an individual so entirely exempt from pretension or affectation as Lieutenant Merman. He appears to me to be unexceptionable.”

“ Well,” said the Reverend Divine," there must be tastes of all sorts; for my part, I think him as empty a coxcomb as ever stepped~"

Mrs. Brandyball stared with astonishment.
“ And I,” said I, “ think him odious.”
Her eyes opened still wider.

“Ah,” said Cuthbert, “ do you know I have never taken the trouble to think whether I like him or not."

The manner in which our fair visiter was mystified was exceedingly amusing to us: it was evident, not only that she felt wonderfully disappointed by the manner in which her eulogiums upon the Lieutenant had been received, but that she set us down as two of the most hardened hypocrites that ever existed. What else could she think? she had seen

May. -YOL. L. NO. cxcvii.

B

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