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but I had rather it would please you I might be whipp'd.

Duke. Whipp'd first, sir, and hang'd after. -
Proclaim it, provost, round about the city,
If any woman's wrong'd by this lewd fellow,
(As I have heard bim swear himself there's one
Whom he begot with child,) let her appear,
And he shall marry her : the nuptial finishid,
Let him be whipp'd and hang’d.

Lucio. I beseech your highness, do not marry me to a whore! Your highness said even now, I made you a duke: good my lord, do not recompense me in making me a cuckold.

Duke. Upon mine honour, thou shalt marry her. Thy slanders I forgive; and therewithal Remit thy other forfeits : 48— Take him to prison; And see our pleasure herein executed.

Lucio. Marrying a punk, my lord, is pressing to death, whipping, and hanging.

Duke. Slandering a prince deserves it. —
She, Claudio, that you wrong'd, look you restore.
Joy to you, Mariana ! - love her, Angelo :
I have confess'd her, and I know her virtue. —
Thanks, good friend Escalus, for thy much good

ness :
There's more behind, that is more gratulate.“
Thanks, provost, for thy care and secrecy;
We shall employ thee in a worthier place: -
Forgive him, Angelo, that brought you home
The head of Ragozine for Claudio's:
The offence pardons itself. — Dear Isabel,

45 Dr. Johnson says, forfeits means punishments; but is it not more likely to signify misdoings, transgressions, from the French forfait ? Steevens's note affords instances of the word in this

seuse.

4 That is, more to be rejoiced in.

I have a motion much im,
Whereto if you'll a will:
What's mine is yours. a
So, bring us to our ne

much imports your good;

Poull a willing ear incline, Wheretoe is yours, and what is yours is mine. —

us to our palace ; where we'll show yet behind, that's meet you all should know.

(Ereunt. INTRODUCTION

TO

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING.

The earliest notice that has reached us of Much ADO ABOUT NOTHING is an entry in the books of the Stationers' Company, bearing date August 4, 1600, and running thus :

“ As You Like It, a book.
“ Henry the Fifth, a book.
« Every Man in his Humour, a book. 7 "

ook To be stayed." “ Much Ado about Nothing, a book.) Why these plays were thus entered and the publication stayel, cannot be certainly determined: probably it was to protect the authorized publishers and the public against those « stolen and surreptitious copies" which the editors of the folio allege to have been put forth. In the same Register, under the date of August 23, 1600, the following entry was made by Andrew Wise and William Aspley : « Two books, the one called Much Ado about Nothing, and the other The Second Part of the History of King Henry the IV., with the Humours of Sir John Falstaff: Written by Mr. Shakespeare." "This entry was for publication ; which may infer that the stay of August 4 had been revoked by the 23d or the same month. In the course of the same year a quarto pamphlet of thirty-six leaves was published, with a title-page reading as follows : « Much Ado ab ut Nothing : As it hath been sundry times publicly acted by the right honourable the Lord Chamberlain his servants. Written by William Shakespeare. - London : Printed by V. S. for Andrew Wise and William Aspley. 1600." The frequent use of the play on the public stage, and the need of a stay to prevent a stolen issue, may doubtless be taken as evidence of a pretty good run. There is one more contemporary reference to this play, which should not be omitted. Mr. Steevens ascertained from one of Vertue's manuscripts that Much Ado about Nothing once passed under the title of Benedick and Beatrice;

I have a motion much imports your good;
Whereto if you'll a willing ear incline,
What's mine is yours, and what is yours is mine. —
So, bring us to our palace ; where we'll show
What's yet behind, that's meet you all should know.

(Exeunt.

INTRODUCTION

TO

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING.

The earliest notice that has reached us of Much ADO ABOUT Nothing is an entry in the books of the Stationers' Company, bearing date August 4, 1600, and running thus :

“ As You Like It, a book.
· Henry the Fifth, a book.

Every Man in his Humour, a book. To be slayed." “ Much Ado about Nothing, a book.) Why these plays were thus entered and the publication stayel, cannot be certainly determined: probably it was to protect the authorized publishers and the public against those « stolen and surreptitious copies” which the editors of the folio allege to have been put forth. In the same Register, under the date of August 23, 1600, the following entry was made by Andrew Wise and William Aspley: “ Two books, the one called Much Ado about Nothing, and the other The Second Part of the History of King Henry the IV., with the Humours of Sir John Falstaff : Written jy Mr. Shakespeare." This entry was for publication ; which may infer that the stay of August 4 had been revoked by the 23d of the same month. In the course of the same year a quarto pamphlet of thirty-six leaves was published, with a title-page reading as follows : “Much Ado ab ut Nothing : As it hath been sundry times publicly acted by the right honourable the Lord Chamberlain his servants. Written by William Shakespeare. - London : Printed by V. S. for Andrew Wise and William Aspley. 1600.” The frequent use of the play on the public stage, and the need of a stay to prevent a stolen issue, may doubtless be taken as evidence of a pretty good run. There is one more contemporary reference to this play, which should not be omitted. Mr. Steevens ascertained from one of Vertue's manuscripts that Much Ado about Nothing once passed under the title of Benedick and Beatrice ;

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