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Ari.

That's my noble master! What shall I do ! say what : what shall I do? Pro. Go, make thyself like a nymph o' the sea

be subject To no sight but thine and mine ; invisible To every eyeball else. Go, take this shape, And hither come in't: go; hence, with diligence.

[Erit ARIEL Awake, dear heart, awake! thou hast slept well : Awake!

Mira. The strangeness of your story put
Heaviness in me.
Pro.

Shake it off: Come on :
We'll visit Caliban, my slave, who never
Yields us kind answer.
Mira.

"Tis a villain, sir, I do not love to look on.

But, as 'tis,
We cannot miss 28 him : he does make our fire,
Fetch in our wood, and serves in offices
That profit us. What ho! slave ! Caliban !
Thou earth, thou ! speak.

Cal. [Within. There's wood enough within.
Pro. Come forth, I say : there's other business

for thee :
Come forth, thou tortoise ! when ? 29

Pro.

Re-enter ARIEL, like a Water-nymph.
Fine apparition ! My quaint 30 Ariel,
Hark in thine ear.
Ari.

My lord, it shall be done. [Ent.

23 i. e. we cannot do without him. The phrase is still common in the midland counties.

29 This is a common expression of impatience.
2 Quain: here means brisk, from the French cointc.

IBAN.

Pro. Ibou poisonous slave, got by the devil

himself Upon thy wicked dam, come forth !

Enter CALIBAN. Cal. As wicked dew as e'er my mother brush'd With raven's feather from unwholesome fen Drop on you both! a south-west blow on ye, And blister you all o'er ! Pro. For this, be sure, to-night thou shalt have

cramps, Side-stitches that shall pen thy breath up; urchins 31 Shall, for that vast 32 of night that they may work, All exercise on thee : thou shalt be pinch'd As thick as honey-combs, each pinch more stinging Than bees that made them. Cal.

I must eat my dinner This island's mine, by Sycorax my mother, Which thou tak’st from me. When thou camest

first, Thou strok'dst me, and mad'st much of me; would'st

give me Water with berries in't ; and teach me how To name the bigger light, and how the less, That burn by day and night : and then I lov'd thee, And show'd thee all the qualities o' the isle, The fresh springs, brine pits, barren place, and

fertile : a Urchins were fairies of a particular class. Hedgehogs were also called urchins ; and it is probable that the sprites were so named, because they were of a mischievous kind, the urchin being anciently deemed a very noxious animal. In the phrase still current, "a little urchin," the idea of the fairy still remains.

32 So in Hamlet, Act i. sc. 2, " in the dead vast and middle of the night;" meaning the silent void or vacancy of night, when spirits were anciently supposed to walk abroad on errands of love, or sport, or mischief.

Cursed be I that did so ! — All the charms
Of Sycorax, toads, beetles, bats, light on you !
For I am all the subjects that you have,
Which first was mine own king: and here you sty

me
In this hard rock, whiles you do keep from me
The rest o' the island.
Pro.

Thou most lying slave, Whom stripes may move, not kindness, I have us'd

thee, Filth as thou art, with human care ; and lodg'd thee In mine own cell, till thou didst seek to violate The honor of my child.

Cal. O ho, O ho !— 'would it had been done! Thou didst prevent me; I had peopled else This isle with Calibans. Pro.

Abhorred slave, Which any print of goodness will not take, Being capable of all ill! I pitied thee, Took pains to make thee speak, taught thee each

hour One thing or other : when thou didst not, savage, Know thine own meaning, but would'st gabble like A thing most brutish, I endow'd thy purposes With words that made them known : But thy vile

race, Though thou didst learn, had that in't which good

natures Could not abide to be with ; therefore waεt thou Deservedly confin'd into this rock, Who hadst deserv'd more than a prison.

Cal. You taught me language; and my profit on't Is, I know how to curse: The red plague rid” you, For learning me your language !

33 Destrov.

Pro.

Hag-seed, hence! Fetch us in fuel ; and be quick, thou wert best, To answer other business. Shrug'st thou, malice ? If thou neglect'st, or dost unwillingly What I command, I'll rack thee with old cramps ; Fill all thy bones with aches; 34 make thee roar, That beasts shall tremble at thy din. Cal.

No, 'pray thee! (Aside. I must obey : his art is of such power, It would control my dam's god, Setebos, 35 And make a vassal of him. Pro.

So, slave ; hence!

[Exit CALIBAN.

Re-enter ARIEL invisible, playing and singing ;

FERDINAND following him.

ARIEL's Song.
Come unto these yellow sands,

And then take hands:

14 Aches was formerly a word of two syllables, and is requirea by the measure to be so here. Of this there are many examples in the old writers. Some of our readers may have heard of the clamour that was raised against Kemble for pronouncing the word thus on the stage; wherein some may still think he followed an old custom at the expense of good judgment.

H. 35 Setebos was the name of an American god, or rather devil, worshipped by the Patagonians. In Eden's “ History of Travaile," printed in 1577, is an account of Magellan's voyage to the South Polo, containing a description of this god and his worshippers; wherein the author says. “When they felt the shackles fast about their legs, they began to doubt; but the captain did put them in comfort and bade them stand still. In fine, when they saw how they were deceived, they roared like bulls, and cryed upon their great devil Setebos, to help them.” Sycorax, as we have seen, was from Algiers, where she doubtless learned to worship this god. So that here the Poet has but transferred into the neighbourhood of his scene the matter of some of the then recent dscoveries in America.

Cursed be I that did so ! - All the charms
Of Sycorax, toads, beetles, bats, light on you !
For I am all the subjects that you have,
Which first was mine own king: and here you sty

me

In this hard rock, whiles you do keep from me
The rest o' the island.
Pro.

Thou most lying slave, Whom stripes may move, not kindness, I have us'd

thee,

Filth as thou art, with human care ; and lodg’d thee
In mine own cell, till thou didst seek to violate
The honor of my child.

Cal. O ho, O ho !- 'would it had been done!
Thou didst prevent me; I had peopled else
This isle with Calibans.
Pro.

Abhorred slave, Which any print of goodness will not take, Being capable of all ill! I pitied thee, Took pains to make thee speak, taught thee each

hour One thing or other : when thou didst not, savage, Know thine own meaning, but would'st gabble like A thing most brutish, I endow'd thy purposes With words that made them known : But thy vile

race, Though thou didst learn, had that in't which good

natures Could not abide to be with ; therefore waæt thou Deservedly confin'd into this rock, Who hadst deserv'd more than a prison.

Cal. You taught me language; and my profit on't Is, I know how to curse: The red plague rid 33 you, For learning me your language !

33 Destrov.

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