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APPENDIX TO THE AMERICAN EDITION.

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To many readers it will be a surprise to learn that the United States is far behind the rest of the world in collective operations, both municipal and national, the principles of which are so admirably set forth in this book. For example, all of the civilized governments of the world own and operate the telegraph (as a part of the postal system), except Bolivia, Cyprus, Honduras, Cuba, Hawaii and the United States! Twenty-five of the leading civilized countries of the worid, including Canada, have a system of state savings banks; but the United States is not one of these twenty-five progressive nations. Fifty-four governments own their railroads, wholly, or in part; in the following countries the railroads are owned and operated entirely by private companies: Barbadoes, Basutoland, Bolivia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Guatemala, Hawaii, Honduras, Mexico, Montenegro, Morocco, Persia, Siam, Spain, United Kingdoni, Venezuela, Zululand, United States! Shall we judge a nation by the company it keeps? In municipal government and collective activity the United States is notoriously behind the more progressive parts of the old world. For example, in 1891, there were in the world five hundred gas plants owned by municipalities, and only ten of them were in the United States ! In 1890, twenty-nine cities in England owned their street railways; and since that date the sentiment in favor of municipal management of public functions has grown with wonderful rapidity in that country. [For full details on this subject, see Vrooman's Government Ownership; price $1.]

The reasons for government telegraphs are many. Private monopoly and profit, causing high prices of telegrams and restricted service, are obvious objections to our present system; but private control of the means of rapid transmission of intelligence is perhaps the greater objection. The abuses are easy and numerous. Newspapers that wish prompt service must not 'oppose the monopoly. Prices and politics are manipulated against the general welfare. Other countries have seen the importance of making the telegraph a part of the postal service. Why should the United States stay in the rear of the procession ?

State savings banks are in successful operation in England, Canada, Austria-Hungary, France, Belgium, Netherlands, Denbiark, Germany, Italy, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, India, Ceylon, Finland, Japan, Argentina, Australia, New Zealand, Hawaii, and Trinidad. But it seems that the influence of private banking interests upon congress is too great for us to get

postal savings banks. A few of “the faithful" have been striv. ing for years in this direction, but the “money power" has thus far been too great. The advantage of these institutions to both the government and to the people are obvious. They would place savings banks, with absolute security, within easy reach of every citizen of this great country. No more “closing the doors upon the hard-earned savings of those who are least able to bear loss from unstable institutions. Absolute security and convenient facilities would be great incentives to saving. At the same time these institutions would be a strength to the United States treasury. It is calculated that $200,000,000 would be deposited in these banks the first year. Rich men put their money into United States bonds for safety and interest; poor men should have the opportunity to put their savings into United States banks.

Ex-Postmaster-General Wanamaker ably advocated both postal savings banks and government telegraph during his term of office (see his reports). But his party did not support him. We can find a party that will support these measures. Examine the various platforms and support the party whose platform plainly embodies these ideas. Our interests are in the direction of economic justice to the masses, and against speculation, manipulation and unnatural profits. Hence all public functions should be conducted for the service of the people, and not for private profit. See articles by Professor Frank Parsons, in the Arena, 1895–6, on railroads, telegraphs, street railways, electric lights in cities, etc. New York, 1896.

X.

INDEX.

PAGE

PAGE

AGITATOR, the paid, abuse of. 157 England's ability to feed her
a useful man...
...158 people.........

......... 24-7
the salt of the earth..

.....158

interest to grow corn..... 28--9
past and present...... - 161-2 FACTORY system, arguments
Apprenticeship and mill sla- against...

.18-24
very.

...139-40 acts, freedom of contract
Art, public museums the pro- before the passing of....139

per place for works of... 149 Family the happiest kind of
Artistic work, value of..... 126-8 society.......... .......115
BODILY wants, fewness of..17-18 Food and clothes... -33-4
Bradlaugh's objections to so- GAiN and honor..............I12-14
cialism ans'd..110-12, 115-17 HEALTH maps...

..... 21-2
Bread, dangers of cheap....28-9 Household waste, trouble,
British Islands now belong to and unpleasantness.... 39-41

rich men... ........47-8 Human nature tends to good..94
CAPITAL mostly reproduced Humanity, types of...........95-6
each year.......

-58-9 INCOME of classes and masses, 47
useless without labor... 149-50 Individualism, a relic of say- ·
Capitalists and workers....... 48 agery

.135
and inventors..... .......104-5

evils of......

.136-9
and capital, difference be- Industry, good and selfish, 124-8
tween..

149-50 Ingersoll's objections to so-
not indispensable to labor..151 cailism answered...... 118-20
make and administer laws..163 JAPANESE house, description, 35-6
and strikes........

.165 LABOR badly organized.........IE
Children are what they are cheap, means cheap goods
taught...

..131-2 and low wages............76-8
Collieries and socialism....... 101 necessity for representa-
Commercial waste paid for tives of.......

.162-5
by the worker...... .42 Land,

proper cultivation of..25-6
Cominunal domestic arrange- original title of, due to con-

ments, advantages of......41 quest or theft............. 49-50
Competition the ideal of Brit- no man a right to........... 50-I
ish society......

and labor........

.52–3
evils of, and of monopoly town land and high rents..53-4

and bad management, 36-8, and patent laws compared...54

...........66-8, 101, 104-6, 133 benefits of nationalizing.... 84
suggestions for improve- values, manipulation of......52
ment on........

37-8 Leisure, proper employment
and consumers..

72 of, in a well-ordered
false theories of....... .99-100 state ....

.42
Country, beauties of the... 19-20 Life, problem of, to find how
DEATH-RATES in town and the people may make the
country.........

.........21-3 best of the country and
Density of manufacturing po-

themselves .... .......II
pulation of British Isles..22 problem of, unanswered....32
Drink and drinking......... 129–30

needful things of 12-17, 39
drunkenness a disease...... 129 of John Smith and the

poverty the chief cause of.. 132 gipsy contrasted............. 33
EARNINGS, national distribu- Loafers, treatment of, now
tion of..................46–7, 145

and under socialism...152-3

II

.82-90 .86-90

PAGE

PAGE Luxuries and recessaries..141-9 Socialism, honesty of practical.62

all, paid for in labor......... 149 the real remedy for existthe Duke of Argyll's de- ing evils....

..81 fense of, answered...... 142–8 what it is and what it is cost of..... .147 not..

.81-5 Man, effects of surroundings practical, defined............82-5

on life of.............63, 129-30 ideal, defined...... ....85 indebtedness to his fellows what it will do........

....63-5, 116-17 how to accomplish best, not the best paid..114-16 arguments against, refuted Manchester school....... 12-20, 28

.90, 110-12, 115-23 dwellings unfit to live in... 34-5 socialists real students of Manufactures, distribution..

21-2 human nature....... ..90 Matches, cheap, because the will not compel a man to

worker is badly paid, 72–3,80 work against his will......118 cheap, really dear..

.80

not slavery...... .......118-19 Members of parliament, pay

under, work for all..........153 ment of......

.113

and disagreeable work... 154-5 Middlemen are employers of snobbery and gentility will labor, and so are all rich

perish under..

.155 men except the money

the finest scheme of life inlender and landlord........61 surance yet devised.......156 and competition .............68-9 the way to realize, is to Money grubbing, great social make socialists.............162

changes needed to de- Spencer's objections to......118

prive it of its power.......97 State farms the base for the Monopoly wanted that will formation of communal raise wages and keep

towns...

........88 down rent and interest....79 Supply and demand, law of,69-71 Morley's objections to social- “Survival of the fittest" theism answered....II2-15, 117 ory...

... 106-10 OFFICIALS and socialism...I11-12 this is another phrase for PARLIAMENT to-day a parlia

anarchy.. ment of privilege..... ..66 TRADE unionism not a sufPaupers, cost of able-bodied...88 ficient defense...... .163-5 Politicians and workers.... 162–3 Vanity a stronger passion Poor, waste of the life of the, 43--5 than greed......

.......95-6 libels on the, refuted......123-8 WAGES regulated by compethe slavery of................. 121-3 tition..

.......68-9 luxury the direct cause of Wants, increase of, means the misery of............141-51

increase of labor.......... 148-9 Postal service and the state..102 Water, tremendous power of...27 Poverty of rich men -59 Wealth, unequal distribution 46-3 Profit, explanation of.. .60-63 all produced by labor....55-65 RASCALS, cost of.........

.138

mostly reproduced yearly, 58-9 how treated by socialism, 140-1 real functions of.............48-9 Riches and industry...........55-9 Wheat, home and foreign...28–30 Salt, cheapness, waste, and fields the battle-fields of life..31 remedy..

73-5 Women, domestic slavery of.35-7 Scavenger, the, an important Work and toil, difference beperson.. .154-5 tween....

33, 125-6 injustice to....

.155 Worker, duty to his kind...166-7 Shirts, cheap, and abstinence slavery of, illustrated by a of the worker.............133-4

letter to the author.......122

.....IIO

REIGN OF THE STOICS.

BY FREDERIC MAY HOLLAND.

Reaá the philosophers, and learn how to make life happy,
se king useful precepts and brave and noble words which may
become deeds.-SENECA.

With Citations of Authorities Quoted from on Each

Page.

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