History of Europe: From the Fall of Napoleon, in 1815, to the Accession of Louis Napoleon, in 1852, Том 6

Передня обкладинка
 

Відгуки відвідувачів - Написати рецензію

Не знайдено жодних рецензій.

Вибрані сторінки

Зміст

Fever of speculation in France
9
General frauds committed on the public
10
Influence of the passion for gain on literature and the press
11
Change it induced in the system of government
12
Scandalous increase of corruption in France
13
Position of Count Molé and his attention to the Court
14
Statistics of the army and social concerns ib 17 Last illness and death of Talleyrand
16
His character
17
Conspiracy of Hubert
18
Louis Napoleon is obliged to leave Switzerland and come to England
20
Evacuation of Ancona
22
Military preparations and wild views of the Belgian republicans
23
Views of the English Cabinet on the subject
24
Obstinacy of the Belgians and military preparations of France and Prussia
25
Failure of the Bank of Brussels and settlement of the question
26
Commencement of the troubles in Canada
27
Differences of France and Mexico
28
Reflections on the attack of land defences by sea forces
29
Instances on each side
30
Probable conclusion on the subject
31
Coalition against and dissolution of the Chambers
32
Ministerial crisis and attempt to form a Liberal Administration
33
Vain attempts to form a Ministry
34
La Société des Familles Its organisation
35
Which is changed into the Société des Saisons
36
Insurrection of May 12 which is suppressed
37
Second Ministry of Marshal Soult
38
Character of M Villemain
39
State of parties after this change
40
Trial of Barbès and the conspirators
41
Conviction and sentences of the accused
42
Views of Barbès and his associates in this conspiracy
43
Progress of the Napoleon party
44
Increased strength of the Government
45
Debate on the affairs of the East
46
4750 Lamartines speech on the subject
47
Great rise of Sir R Peel in general estimation from this short Adminis
50
5153 Argument of M Villemain on the other side
51
Marshal Soults measures in the East
54
Jouffroys exposition of the Government system
55
Affairs of Africa after the storm of Constantine
57
Their threatening aspect
58
Commencement of the insurrection
59
Vigorous defensive measures and successes of the French
60
Death of the Princess Maria of Würtemberg
61
Creation of twenty peers
62
Commencement of agitation for a lowering of the suffrage
63
View of the Liberals as to the government of the executive
64
Commencement of the session of 1840 the Kings speech
65
6669 Speech of M Thiers on the Eastern question
66
Reflections on this debate
70
Thiers second Ministry
73
First division supports the Ministry
74
Early measures of the Ministry
75
State of the public press
76
Bill regarding infant labour
77
Expedition of Louis Napoleon to Boulogne
80
8182 Failure of the enterprise
81
His trial and sentence of imprisonment
83
His life in prison and its beneficial results
84
Glorious conduct of the militia in the upper province
88
Thiers answer
91
Report of the committee of the Assembly on the wants of Canada
94
Vigorous measures of the French Cabinet
95
Division of opinion on the fortification of Paris
96
Great preparations of M Thiers
97
Guizots memorandum to the English Government
98
Guizots opinions on the Eastern question
99
Withdrawal of the French fleet from the Levant
100
Immediate cause of M Thiers downfall
101
The new Ministry
102
Kings speech at opening the Chamber
103
104106 Debate on the Address
104
105 Loss of the Commissariat Fort
105
107109 Answer of M Guizot
106
Fatal effect of these losses
107
Storm of Mahommed Shereefs Fort
108
Jealousy between Elphinstone and Shelton
109
Division in favour of Government
110
Continuance of the fortifications of Paris
111
Marshal Soults military view of the question
112
Alarming state of the finances
113
Treaty of Feb 13 1841 regarding the East
114
Great escape which Europe made at this period
115
Reflections on this treaty
116
Way in which this was brought about
117
What occasioned the error
118
Negotiations with the enemy
119
Arrival of Akbar Khan and renewal of the negotiation
120
Capitulation with the Affghans
121
Faithlessness of the Affghans and increased misery of the troops
122
Difficulties consequent on
123
His murder by Akbar Khan
124
Reflections on this event
125
Fresh treaty which is opposed by Pottinger
126
Conclusion of the treaty
127
Commencement of the march
128
Increasing horrors of the march
129
378379
130
Ascent of the Coord Cabul plateau and surrender of the ladies
131
Almost entire destruction of the columnn
132
Continuance of the retreat to Jugdulluck
133
Termination of the retreat and arrival of one survivor at Jellalabad
134
Difficulty about the household appointments which causes the negotia
135
Observations of Sir R Peel Lord Melbourne and the Duke of Well
136
ington on the subject 386
138
CHAPTER XXXVI
160
Fate of the bill in the Commons and Peers
175
The state of the Irish corporations
193
The bill is carried in the Commons
200
Treaty of July 15 1840
202
Reestablishment of the Catholic Association
206
Agricultural Distress Committee and refusal of currency investigation
212
ceedings regarding Orange lodges
213
52
215
53
216
5354 54
217
55
218
56
219
Statistics of Irish destitution
224
Page
231
Her Majestys Speech to the Privy Council
240
Death of Mrs Fitzherbert
241
86
242
Ilfounded complaints against him by the Conservatives
243
Beneficial effect of the change of Ministry and dissolution
244
Cause of this
245
CHAPTER XXXVII
246
23 Its many sources of weakness 247248
247
what was its great want?
249
Vast advantages of a paper currency in America
250
Great prosperity of America from 1820 to 1835
251
88
252
Prudence upon the whole of the United States banks
253
Vast purchase of lands in the Far West with these notes
254
Difference between the political feeling of landholders in Europe and America
255
Aristocracy in America grew naturally in the towns
256
What renders party contests so violent in America
258
General jealousy of the banks on the part of the Democratic party
259
his measures against the banks ib 15 Ostensible and real grounds of complaint against the banks
260
the Bank Charter 18 Withdrawal of the public deposits from the United States Bank
262
Which is approved of by the House of Representatives and condemned
263
by the Senate 20 General crash in the Union
264
New York in vain petitions in favour of the Bank
265
Increased hostility of General Jackson to the Bank
266
Increased banking mania in the West
267
The Presidents account of the operations of the western banks
268
Treasury order regarding cash payment for public lands
269
Mr Biddles description of the effects of these measures ib 27 Disastrous effects of this state of things
270
Universal ruin which ensued in America
272
Increased straits of Government and ruin of the revenue
273
JUNE 1837
274
Disastrous effect of these measures on the United States
276
Excess of imports over exports
279
Effect of these changes on the currency
285
89
288
Panic in Belgium and France
291
ib 57
293
Debate on the subject in the House of Commons
297
Vast effect of the changes in the Currency Laws during the peace 2 Leading evils of the Currency Laws 3 Grand error from which they spring 4 Dan...
298
Answer to this argument 11 Such a currency must be based on the national security 12 Effect of the monetary laws in inducing the prosperity of 1835
301
The trial and its results
304
Irish elections and junction of Liberals and Catholics there 22 Division on the choice of a Speaker 23 Division on the Address 114
307
58
308
59
309
60
310
6163 64
314
65
315
66
316
67
317
68
318
69
319
70
320
71
321
116
367
117
369
119
370
120
371
121
372
123
373
124
375
Capture of the vessel by the Russians
376
126
377
128
378
129
379
130
380
131
381
133
382
Election of a Speaker and second Jamaica Bill
387
CHAPTER XXXVIII
388
Her coronation
389
Her marriage to Prince Albert
390
Reflections on this auspicious event
391
His family and Protestant principles
392
Legislative measures of the period Criminal law
393
Reflections on this subject and the neglect of secondary punishments
394
Mode in which the change was brought about
395
1011 Important facts connected with emigration and colonisation brought out in this debate 397398
397
New colonial system of England
399
First settlement of British colonists in New Zealand
400
Postoffice reform Mr Hills plan
405
Results of the measure
406
Causes of its failure as a source of revenue
407
Stockdales case and the privilege of Parliament
409
Committal of the Sheriffs for breach of privilege
410
2324 Reflections on this subject
411
Murder of Lord Norbury and crime in Ireland
412
Statistics of Irish crime in 1837 1838 and 1839
413
Alliance of the Government with OConnell
414
Lord Normanbys wholesale liberation of offenders
415
The misery of Ireland and inadequacy of the remedies proposed
417
Which mainly arose from Ireland being the battlefield of parties
418
ib 32 Increased perils of the country in various quarters
420
Injustice of the general opinion on the subject
421
Slight increase of the army in 1839
422
Extreme weakness of the navy ib 36 Outcry for the abolition of the Corn Laws
424
Mr Villiers motion for the repeal of the Corn Laws lost
426
Increased agitation on the subject ib 39 Attack on the Queen
427
Extreme difficulties of Ministers
429
New Reform Bill for Ireland and its fate
430
The Whig budget
431
Which is lost on a division
432
4447 Sir R Peels argument against the budget 433435
433
4852 Lord Palmerstons reply 436439
436
Reflections on this debate
440
Subsequent measures Vote of want of confidence
441
Dissolution of Parliament
442
Immense excitement in the country ib 57 Result of the elections decidedly in favour of the Tories
443
Defeat of Ministers in both Houses and their resignation
445
Reflections on the fall of the Whigs
447
The fall of the Whigs was owing to the Reform Bill
448
The supremacy of England was destroyed by the Reform Bill
449
Which is owing to Catholic ascendancy in Ireland and passion for self government in Scotland
450
CHAPTER XXXIX
452
Reasons of this universal feeling
453
Apparent exception this rule in British India
454
Advantages of the English government ib 5 Evils of the English government which have subsequently appeared
455
Extent of the British empire in India 7 Great payments drawn from India and spent in England
456
Injury to Indian industry from the connection with Great Britain
459
Causes of the extreme poverty of the inbabitants of India
460
Great extent of the seacoast of India 13 Great public works which formerly existed in India 14 Difficulties of the British Government as regards publi...
468
Effects of a real reciprocity if established with India
469
Neglect of India as a cottonproducing country
470
Impossibility of augmenting indirect taxes in India
471
Revenues of the Company
473
Monopolies of opium and salt and lesser sources of revenue
476
Military establishment in British India ib 26 Military establishment of India not excessive
478
Sepoy troops
480
True policy to be pursued in regard to India by the British Gove ib ernment
482
Judicial establishment of India 30 The protected States and their rapid decline
483
Great want of a paper circulation in India
484
the Radicals in the Commons
486
Splendour of the recent history of India 34 Lord Cornwalliss second administration
487
Discreditable terms of the treaty to the English Governm ent
488
489
489
concludes the Mahratta peace
491
Lord Mintos Administration
492
Lord Moiras Administration
493
Ghoorka war
494
Early disasters of the campaign ib 42 General Ochterlonys successes
497
Negotiations for a final treaty broken off by the Ghoorkas
498
Causes of the Pindarree war and their outrages
499
Lord Hastings great preparations and commencement of the war
500
Farther successes of Lord Hastings Battle of Kirkee
501
Second check of the Peishwa
502
Farther successes of the British
503
Ravages of the cholera in Lord Hastings army
504
Victory of Lord Hastings and termination of the war
505
End of the war and of Lord Hastings administration
506
Reflections on Lord Hastings government of India
507
Amherst Administration and war with Burmah
508
Irruption of the Mughs and causes of discord with the Burmese
509
Resources of the Burmese and difficulties of the war
510
First operations of the war Taking of Rangoon
511
Slow progress of the war and sickness of the British
512
Successes of the British
513
Reverses sustained by them ib 61 Sufferings of the British in Rangoon
514
Reverses on the Arracan frontier
516
Victories of the British before Rangoon
517
Actions during the advance on Prome
518
Capture of Prome
519
Renewed difficulties of the British from sickness
521
Decisive victories of the British
522
Advance of the British towards the capital and submission of the Burmese
523
Renewal of hostilities and final defeat of the Burmese
524
Conclusion of peace O
525
Reflections on the Burmese and Pindarree wars
526
The Burmese war was necessary and unavoidable
527
Treaty with the King of Siam
528
Mutiny at Barrackpore
529
Reflections on this event
531
Commencement of the difference with the Rajah of Bhurtpore
532
Increased disturbances at Bhurtpore and interference of the British
533
Commencement of the war and forces of the British
534
Commencement and difficulties of the siege
535
Progress of the siege
536
Assault of the place
537
Decisive results of this victory
538
Acquisition of Singapore in the Straits of Malacca
539
CHAPTER XL
540
Restoration of the passage to India by the Red Sea
552
Persia is the chief barrier against the north
558
Rupture with Persia and alliance with Affghanistan
564
Policy which should have been pursued was to support Dost M
576
The siege
584
Final assault
585
Extreme distress of the besieged
587
Interference of the English and raising of the siege
588
Great effects of the raising of the siege in Asia
589
Great effects of this defeat of Russia
590
Great mistake committed on this occasion by the English Government
591
Treaty for the restoration of Shah Soojah 592 54 Treaty for the restoration of Shah Soojah 55 Reflections on this treaty
593
Preparations for the Affghanistan expedition 594 56 Preparations for the Affghanistan expedition 57 The forces
595
Magnificent displays in the Punjaub
597
Commencement of the march
598
Increased sufferings of the troops ib 64 Reception of Shah Soojah in Candahar
603
Passage of the Kyber by Colonel Wades force
604
Great sensation in India from these events
605
Movement of the army towards Cabul
606
Description of Ghuznee and plans of Dost Mahommed
607
Melancholy tragedy before Ghuznee and plan of the attack
608
Capture of the fortress
610
Results of the victory
611
Vain efforts of Dost Mahommed to make a stand and his flight ib 74 Entry of the British into Cabul
612
Honours bestowed on those engaged in the expedition
613
Flattering appearance of the country
614
Real causes of embarrassment to the Indian Government ib 78 Plans of Lord Auckland for the future in Affghanistan
615
Attack on Khelat
616
Pleasant quarters of the troops in Cabul in autumn and winter
617
Growing difficulties of the British position
618
Russian expedition against Khiva
619
Fresh difficulties in Affghanistan
620
Disquieting intelligence from Herat and the Punjaub ib 85 Threatening aspect of things in the Punjaub
621
Progress and varied success of the insurgents
622
Checks in the Bamian Pass
623
Further disasters in the Bamian ib 89 Dost Mahommeds defeat at the Bamian Pass
624
Fresh efforts of Dost Mahommed
625
562
626
His surrender
627
Increased tranquillity of the country
628
Renewed insurrection and victory of Nott
629
Victory of Colonel Wymer near KhelatiGhilzye
630
Commencement of the insurrection
650
657
657
862
663
666
666
Reflections on the injustice of the Affghanistan expedition 138 Errors in the conception of the expedition 139 Disproportion of the force to the objec...
671
672
672

Інші видання - Показати все

Загальні терміни та фрази

Популярні уривки

Сторінка 407 - And he said, BLESSED be the Lord God of Shem ; And Canaan shall be his servant. God shall enlarge Japheth, And he shall dwell in the tents of Shem ; And Canaan shall be his servant.
Сторінка 266 - Resolved, That the President, in the late Executive proceedings in relation to the public revenue, has assumed upon himself authority and power not conferred by the Constitution and laws, but in derogation of both.
Сторінка 484 - they were in large flocks containing both species in the proportion of two of the former to one of the latter " (the present)
Сторінка 271 - Western banks, usually called deposits, were already greatly beyond their immediate means of payment, and were rapidly increasing. Indeed, each speculation furnished means for another; for no sooner had one individual or company paid in the notes than they were immediately lent to another for a like purpose, and the banks were extending their business and their issues so largely as to alarm considerate men and render it doubtful whether these bank credits if permitted to accumulate would ultimately...
Сторінка 390 - Parliament, it was essential to the success of the commission with which your Majesty had honoured Sir Robert Peel, that he should have that public proof of your Majesty's entire support and confidence, which would be afforded by the permission to make some changes in that part of your Majesty's household, which your Majesty resolved on maintaining entirely without change.
Сторінка 145 - Every other idea, and every other end that have been mixed with this, as the making of the church an engine, or even an ally of the state ; converting it into the means of strengthening or diffusing influence ; or regarding it as a support of regal in opposition to popular forms of government, have served only to debase the institution, and to introduce into it numerous corruptions and abuses.
Сторінка 241 - The severe and afflicting loss which the nation has sustained by the death of his Majesty, my beloved uncle, has devolved upon me the duty of administering the government of this empire. This awful responsibility is imposed upon me so suddenly, and at so early a period of my life...

Бібліографічна інформація