Зображення сторінки
PDF
ePub

The

Catholic Miscellany;

AND MONTULY

REPOSITORY OF INFORMATION,

FOR AUGUST, 1823.

>>>> ༠ stateGGGGGGGG

BIOGRAPHY.

[ocr errors]

WILLIAM BALLANTINE, Who may with great propriety be considered the founder of the Scotch missions, was born of Protestant parents of great respectability: His uncle was lord of the sessions, and in con

ence of the titles which he enjoġed was stiled lord Newall, although he actually possessed no title higher than that of knight, and on his mother's side he was descended from the Cockbournes of Skerling. His early years were spent in the college of Edinburgh, from whence he was removed to Paris, and here it was that he became a convert to the Catholic faith, Being not long after sent to Rome, and admitted a student at the Scotch college, although in a very delicate state of health, he nevertheless applied 'himself most diligently to the study of philosophy, and publicly sustained his defensions with great credit to himself in honour of lord James Douglas, son of the marquis, and colonel of the old Scotch regiment in France. When his course of theology was completed, he returned to Paris, but like many others becoming dissatisfied at the man. ner in which the Scotch college was at that time governed, he retired into his native country, a very short time previous to the execution of Charles the first, and commenced his missionary labours, to the great consolation of the suffering. Catholics, who were then most deplorably situated with regard to spiritual instructors. The Almighty gave a blessing to his pious endea

son of John Hoffy, esg. of the Audit office, Somerset-house, to Eleanor, only daughter of captain James Thomas Rickett, of Batavia,

able the house wisely to determine whether such a measure ought to be encouraged. He wished first to obtain a statement of the number of Roman Catholic chapels in England. They were certainly tolerated by law; but it was now necessary to decide whether it was fit that they should be permanently ingrafted on the institutions of this country: this was certainly a question of some importance. Next he was desirous of knowing the number of Roman Catholic schools, academies, and colleges, protected in the same way by law, and which, by the proposed bill, were to be fixed, as it were, in the soil of the kingdom. The third and main topic on which he required information refered to what were termed religious houses, sometimes called reputed convents or monasteries. The noble lord concluded by moving an address to the crown, to direct ihe archbishops and bishops to instruct the parochial clergy of their diocesses to procure and transmit information upon the points to which he had adverted.

The earl of Rosslyn could not of course impute a bad notive to the noble baron, but the obvious ten. dency of the agitation of this subject was to excite clamour ; and if the motion was carried, tumult might be the result before the commencement of the next session. He hoped the noble baron would consent to withdraw his proposition.

The Lord Chancellor wished the noble lord to withdraw his motion.

Lord Colchester withdrew his motion ; but said, that he certainly should renew it, if a bill was brought in, next session.--Motion withdrawn.

DIED. On the 3d ult. Mr. William Shimell, aged 90: until five years before his death, this venerable old man used to walktwo miles and a half to assist at wass on Sundays and holidays.

At Borneheim, in Flanders, on the 13th of June, the rev. John Hyacinth Hairne, 0. S. D. aged 53, and professed twenty years.

On the second of July, aged seventeen years, Thomas Edmund, son of G. Keating, bookseller, of Duke-street, Grosvenor-square;

On the fifth of July, aged sixty-four years, Mr. Michael Harley, late of Constitution-row, Gray’s-inn lane.

On the 5th inst. Maria Amelia, wife of Henry Nassau, esq. of Devonshire. street, Portland-place, aged 24 years.

On Monday the seventh of Juls, Mr. Martin Mordant, formerly an upholder, he was born in October, 1735, and was the father of the congrega. țion attached to the Catholic chapel in Virginia-street.

On the 14th inst, at Cossey, in the county of Norfolk, L, F. Michitte, late of St. Mary's college, Oscott, an ecclesiastic in minor orders, aged 27.

Same day, aged 83 years, Mrs. Catherine Frances Angarde.

Ou Tuesday, the 22d instant, Mr, Thomas Fox, grocer, of Oxford-street, in the 26th year of his age. This excellent young man had only been married two months, when be unfor. tunately met instant death, whilst on an aquatic excursion from London to the Nore, by an accident happening to one of the paddles of the Royal Sovereign steam packet, which caused it to strike against the boards on which he had but one minute before placed himself, and where several of tlie pas. sengers had been in the course of the morning ; the velocity of the wheel immediately drew him into its vortex, where he was instantly dashed to pieces, and buried in the waves. The vessel, which had arrived nearly to its place of destination, was instantly ordered to proceed no further; the dance and the music ceased, and the company returned deeply lamenting the loss of one who, by his industrious habits and uniformly edifying deportment was so well calculated to adorn society,and confer happinessto his now afflicted widow, parents, and friends

BIRTH. On Friday, the 9th of May, at Chidick, the lady of Humphry Weld, esq, of a son.

MARRIED. On the 14th of June, at her mother's house, by the vicar-general of Naples, Amelia, eldest daughter of the late Matthew Higgins, of Bennown, Ireland, to Gaetano Pannola, esq. of Lauro. The ceremony was afterwards performed at the house of Mr. HamLinton, envoy extraordinary and plenipotentiary from his Britanic ma. jesty.

On the first of July, at York, Mr.

orge Bolland, Catholic bookseller, to Winifride, second daughter of Mr. Michael Walker, all of that city.

Lately, Albert Adolphus, second

AMBROSE CUDDON, Printer, 2, Carthusian-strčet, Aldersgate-street.

ANY,

The

John Hoffy, esq. of the And
Somerset-house, to Llease

ughter of captain James De Chell, of Batavia

Catholic Miscellany;

AND MONTULY

REPOSITORY OF INFORMATION,

FOR AUGUST, 1823.

DIED. ne 3d ult. Mr. Willian Sluisa .: until five years beiore in this venerable old man betina to miles and a half to asta

Sundays and holidays orueheim, in Flanders

, oth June, the rer. John Hracis , 0. S. D. aged 58, and proces y years. ne second of July

, aged seves cars, Thomas Edmund, so i

ting, bookseller, of Dulce nor-square. the firth of July, aged sit-in

Mr. Michael Harles, late si ution-row, Gray’s-inn lane he 5th inst. Maria Amelia, né

[ocr errors][merged small]

Ty Nassau, esq. of Dervishi
Portland-place

, aged At Donday the seventh of loy artin Dordant

, formerly an i he was born in October

, 18 as the father of the congres ached to the Catholic clipe inia-street. he 14th inst, at Cossey, iske

of Norfolk, L. F. Slicka St. Mary's college

, Oscat

, a istic in minor orders

, aged day, aged 83 years

, dat Frances Angarde

. Jesday, the 22d instant ! 6th year of his age. These

Fox, grocer, of Oxford-tri young man bad only be

two months, when be mine 7 met instant death, while itic excursion from Londans e, by an accident happening of the paddles of the Roya in steam packet

, which cause ke against the boards on wali put one minute before places and where several of the per had been in the course of tik ; the velocity of the other tely drew him into its rodes e iras instantly dashed od buried in the wares. Tik hich had arrived nearly of destination, was instantly to proceed no further; the d the music ceased, and the returned deeply lamentu f one who, by his industriou d uniformly edifying depart

so well calculated to adom od confer happinessto bisor vidow, parents

WILLIAM BALLANTINE, Who may with great propriety be considered the founder of the Scotch missions, was born of Protestant parents of great respectability. His uncle was lord of the sessions, and in consequence of the titles which he enjoġed was stiled lord Newall, although he actually possessed no title higher than that of knight, and on his mother's side he was descended from the Cockbournes of Skerling. His early years were spent in the college of Edinburgh, from whence he was removed to Paris, and here it was that he became a convert to the Catholic faith, Being not long after sent to Rome, and admitted a student at the Scotch college, although in a very delicate state of health, he nevertheless applied 'himself most diligently to the study of philosophy, and publicly sustained his defensions with great credit to himself in honour of lord James Douglas, son of the marquis, and colonel of the old Scotch regiment in France. When his course of theology was completed, he returned to Paris, but like many others becoming dissatisfied at the manner in which the Scotch college was at that time governed, he retired into his native country, a very short time previous to the execution of Charles the first, and commenced his missionary labours, to the great consolation of the suffering. Catholics, who were then most deplorably situated with regard to spiritual instructors. The Almighty gave a blessing to his pious endea

[ocr errors]

2 X

, and friends

reet, Aldersgate-street

vours, and he became the happy instrument of the conversion of many persons, some of whom were of the first families in Scotland. Through his means, his own brother, who had been a page to the prince elector Palatine, and a major among the covenanters, forsook the errors in which he had been reared, and embracing the faith once delivered to the saints, stortly afterwards expired in sentiments of the greatest compunction and piety. After being thus actively engaged for about a year, he made a trip to Paris, for the purpose of laying before the proper quarter the actual state of the Catholic affairs at home; and also in the hope of procuring co-operators in the work of the Lord's vineyard. In this he was not deceived, for he was

soon joined by a zealous friend whom i he had left in Rome, and they both passed over into Scotland in the year 1650. Here they had much to suffer from the difficulties of the times, nevertheless they were the means of reconciling several respectable families, who had yielded to the long persecution of the covenanters; and they had also the happiness of receiving into the household of the faithful, many others, who renouncing their former erroneous opinions, became living members of the mystical body of the church' of Christ. About the year 1658 Mr. Ballantine took his passage on board a vessel bound from Rye in Sussex, to Dieppe in Normandy, with a view of being present at the approaching religious profession of a sister of lady Huntly. This vessel however was taken by an armed bark from Ostend, and he was robbed of his money and clothes; but he was set at liberty at Ostend as soon as it was known who he was. Upon this occasion one of his fellow-passengers and captives, a man of consequence, and who from the rank he held in society, would scarcely have been supposed to have been engaged in the part of an informer, conjecturing that he would return by Rye, as he had left his horse there, discovered him upon his arrival to the searcher of that port, and insisted upon his apprehension. He was consequently seized, and immediately conveyed to London. He was then carried before Cromwell's secretary, who after some examination committed him to a messenger's house in Westminster, where he was detained upwards of a year, during which time his unaffected piety, his resignation, and his peaceable conduct, so far obtained him the good will of his keeper, that he reported him in so favourable a light to Cromwell's court, as to induce the secretary to grant him his discharge, and to order all his expenses to be reimbursed. As soon as he recovered his liberty, he again went to France,'where he spent but a very short time, and then returned to the zealous performance of his missionary duties in his own country. Here he was the happy means of reconciling James Crichton, a fallen Catholic priest of Carco, who shortly afterwards died in sentiments of great fervour and compunction. Some time after this he settled in the north of Scotland, and resided at lady Huntly's, at Elgin, and here his last sickness seized him, which was of short duration ; for he remained ill but a few days, edifying all who attended him, by his profound resignation to the divine will, by his humility, and by the ardent piety of his dying accents, he happily breathed his last ; and such was the esteem in which he was held, that the magistracy, and nearly the whole population of the town of Elgin accompanied his funeral, which took place at torch light. Thus closed the active but too short life of this zealous and indefati. gable missionary. He was mild and affable in his manners, a good preacher, and an excellent controvertist; in his devotional exercises he was particularly attached to the works of father Lewis, of Grenada, Roderigues, St. Francis de Sales, father Suffren; indeed from this last author, he principally extracted the little book, which appeared after his death, entitled, A Praparation for Death, or the Practice of Dying Well, printed anno 1672. It was greatly admired, and certainly is a standing proof that he himself was well prepared to meet the awful event. He had successfully exerted himself in establishing a small fund which he raised upon the continent in aid of the Scottish clergy, and he procured books, vestments, &c. to supply the exigences of the mission. Indefatigable in his labours, he spared neither time nor personal convenience, when the wants of his neighbour were to be relieved, or the interests of religion could be promoted. In fine, he made himself all to all, and was indeed an Insraelite in whom there was no guile.

« НазадПродовжити »