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CONTENTS OF VOL. VI.

Page

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ART. I. THE PRIMITIVE STATE OF ART. VIII. REVIEW OF QUINCY'S

MANKIND. By Philip Lindsley, HISTORY OF HARVARD UNIVER-

D. D., Pres. of the University of SITY. By one of the Professors

Nashville, Tenn.

1 of Yale College,

177

Art. II. BAPTISM;—THE INTER- ART. IX. ANGLO-SAXON LITERA-

PRETATION OF Rom. 6: 3, 4, AND

TURE,

196

Col. 2: 12. By Rev. Edward

Beecher, Pres. of Illinois Col- ART. X. REVIEW OF COLEMAN'S AN.

lege,

28 TIQUITIES THE CHRISTIAN

CHURCH. By Ralph Emerson,

Art. III. THE STUDY OF THE Clas- D. D., Prof. of Eccl. Hist., Theol.
SICS AS AN INTELLECTUAL Disci. Sem. Andover, Mass.

212

PLINE. By E. D. Sanborn, Prof.

of the Latin Lang. and Lit., Dart- ART. XI. CRITICAL NOTICES.

mouth, N. H.

56 1. Grani's Nestorians,

227

2. Parker's Lectures on Univer-

ART. IV. RELIGIOUS LITERATURE

ealism,

229

OF FRANCE AND SWITZERLAND : 3. Robinson's Bib. Researches, 230

-GAUSSEN ON DIVINE INSPIRA-

4. Anthon's Classical Diction-

TION. By an American in Paris, 76

ary,

233

Religious Literature of France and 5. History of Missions in the

Switzerland,

77

South Sea,

235

Gaussen's Theopneustia,

87 6. Christian Experience, 236

7. Hall's Refutation of Baptist

ART. V. THE ANTEDILUVIAN CHRO-

Errors,

236

NOLOGY OF THE BIBLE. Transla-

8. Stephens' Travels in Central

ted from the Latin of Michaelis,

America,

237

by Stephen Chase, Prof. of Math.

9. Hallam's Lit. of Europe, 241

in Dartmouth College, N. H. 114

10. Phelps' Perpetuity of the

Note by the Editor,

114 Sabbath,

242

11. Sutton on the Lord's Supper, 243

12. Sutton's Disce Mori, 243

ART. VI. THE COMMON SCHOOL

13. Taylor's History of Society, 244

SYSTEM OF NEW ENGLAND, WITH 14. Baldwin's Themes for the

SOME ACCOUNT OF THE RECENT

Pulpit,

245

IMPROVEMENTS ADOPTED IN Mas-

15. Schlegel's Philosophy of

SACHUSETTS AND CONNECTICUT.

History,

245

By Rev. Emerson Davis, West- 16. Rauch's Psychology, 246

field, Mass.

139
17. Livingston's Oxford Theol-

ogy,

ART. VII. THE RABBIES AND THEIR 18. Todd's Great Cities,

248

LITERATURE. By Isaac Nordhei- 19. Old Humphrey's Observa-

mer, D. P., Prof. Orient. Lang.,

tions,

248

University of the City of New- 20. Old Humphrey's Addresses, 248

York,

154 21. Lindley's Horiiculture, 249

Historical Sketch of the Rabbinical 22. Gallaudet and Hooker's

Schools in Persia,

154 Spelling-Book,

249

Historical Sketch of the Schools in 23. Memorial of Jay's Jubilee 250

Spain,

163| Art. XII. RECENT LITERARY IN-

The Jewish Ritual,

173

TELLIGENCE,

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ABt. I. THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE DR. I. NORDHEIMER, ON THE Use

GNOSTICS :- THE MANICHEAN AND OMISSION OF THE HEBREW

HERESY, AND INFLUENCE

ARTICLE SOME IMPORTANT

GNOSTICISM ON CHRISTIANITY. PASSAGES OF SCRIPTURE,

404

By the Rev. G. B. Cheever, Prof. Stuart's Letter,

404

New-York,

253 Dr. Nordheimer's Reply,

. 412

Tenets and Discipline of the Mani.

chæans,

261 Art. VIII. REVIEW OF ROBINSON'S

Antiquity of the Sources of Gnosti-

BIBLICAL RESEARCHES. By Rev.

cism,

269 Charles Hall, New-York, 419

Causes of the Spread and Power ART. IX. THE NESTORIANS. RE-
of Gnosticism,

282

VIEW OF DR. GRANT'S THEORY
Influence on Christianity,

287

OF THE Lost TRIBES. By Prof.

Gnosticism in the Romish Church, 293 E. Robinson, D. D., Theol.

Sem., New-York,

454

ART. II. REVIEW OF CLARK'S SER- Letter from the Rev. J. Perkins, 457

By Rev. Prof. G.

Shepard, Theol. Sem., Bangor, ART. X. CRITICAL Notices.

Me.

297 1. Davies' Sermons,

482

2. Stuart's New Testament

Авт. . III. Psycho-PhysIOLOGY,

Grammar,

483

VIEWED

CONNECTION

3. Bush's Notes on Exodus, 484

WITH THE Religious EMOTIONS. 4. Trumbull's Autobiography, 486

By Prof. S. Adams, Illinois Col., 5. Sermons by Contributors to

Jacksonville, Illinois,

321 the “Tracts for the Times," 488

6. Kendrick's Greek Introduc-

ART. IV. THE A POSTERIORI ARGU-

tion,

489

MENT FOR THE BEING OF GOD.

7. Hitchcock's Elementary

By the Rev. Prof. L. P. Hickok,

Geology,

490

Western Reserve Col., Hudson, 8. Buckingham's America, 491

Ohio,

350 9. Stone's Life and Times of

Red-Jacket,

495

ART. V. REMARKS IN REPLY TO 10. Philosophy of the Plan of

THE QUESTIONS OF “INQUIRER;"

Salvation,

496

Am. Bib. Repos. for April, 1840, 11. Miss Sedgwick's Letters

(Continued). By Rev. Prof.

from abroad,

497

L. Woods, D. D., Theol. Sem., 12. Perkins' Higher Arithmetic, 498

Andover, Mass.

365 13. James' Widow Directed,

· 498

14. Buck's Religious Anecdotes, 499

ART. VI. REVIEW OF Quincy's His. 15. Smyth's Prelatical Doctrine

TORY OF HARVARD UNIVERSITY

Examined,

499

(Continued). By one of the Pro- 16. Smyth's Ecclesiastical Cate-

fessors of Yale College,

384

chism,

500

17. Additional Notices,

501
Art. VII. CORRESPONDENCE BE- Art. XI. RECENT LITERARY IN
TWEEN PROF. M. STUART AND TELLIGENCE,

503

.

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1

THE

AMERICAN

BIBLICAL REPOSITORY.

JULY, 1841.

SECOND SERIES, NO. XI.-WHOLE NO, XLIII.

ARTICLE I.

THE PRIMITIVE STATE OF MANKIND.

An attempt to prove that the original or most ancient conditica

of the human family was CIVILIZED, and nnt SAVAGE.

By Philip Lindsley, D. D., President of the University of Nashville, Tennessee.

[Continued from Vol. IV., page 298.] I HAVE said that it can be proved from REASON, SCRIPTURE, and HISTORY, that the primitive state of the human race was civilized. I have shown how reason, prior to any investigation of facts, confirms the position, and how unreasonable is every other hypothesis. I have exhibited the scriptural aecount of man's creation; and exposed the absurdity of supposing that he could have proceeded from the hand of an infinitely wise, good and powerful Being, mature in his corpqreal faculties, and yet destitute of mental furniture, or deficient in wisdom and intellect. Or, in other words, that he should have been formed only a full-grown infant ; and, in that helpless condition, have been left by his Creator to grope his way in this new world, friendless, ignorant, unprotected-without a guide or instructor to aid in the gradual development of his rational powers, and in the attainment of that knowledge and skill which his situation imperiously demanded from the beginning; and without which he must either soon have perished, SECOND SERIES, VOL. VI. NO. I.

1

life upon

or remained forever in a degraded and brutish condition. I have shown that Scripture, so far from countenancing any such representation of his original state and character, does directly and most clearly contradict it. I have rapidly sketched his early history, and brought under review the several facts recorded by the pen of inspiration calculated to illustrate this dark period of human society,-extending from the creation to the deluge. I have followed the same safe and infallible guide, from this second commencement of our wayward race, to the building of the tower of Babel: and in all this progress through the lapse and the revolutions of nearly eighteen centuries, we have discovered no trace of

the earth. All the data with which we are furnished, and all the analogical reasoning which these data suggest go to the establishment of the proposition, that man existed from the beginning in a state of civilization, with very many, if not all, of the arts and improvements which usually distinguish and adorn such a state; and that he continued in this state down to the period just specified. I have also shown it to be highly probable that, soon after the dispersion of mankind from the fruitful plains of Shinar, they began in many places to degenerate; that, while the arts flourished and extended along the banks of the Tigris, the Euphrates and the Nile-upon the eastern and southern shores of the Mediterranean Sea-in the intermediate and adjacent countries—and perhaps far into India and the East they were either totally or nearly lost by the numerous colonies which migrated, under inauspicious circumstances, into more barren, ungenial and inhospitable climes, especially where all future intercourse between the colonies and the parent stock was rendered difficult or impracticable. I have shown how easy it is for men to degenerate into savages ;that this is a very natural process and of frequent occurrence;that we everywhere behold families and individuals, even in the midst of the most refined society, and within sight of our proudest institutions of science and noblest monuments of art, ignorant, degraded and removed but a single step from the savage of the wilderness; that it requires the constant care and studious discipline of parents and teachers for many years, to train up children to habits of industry, good order and common civility of deportment,--to make them respectable farmers, mechanics and tradesmen ; much more to imbue their minds with science and literature, to qualify them for distinction and

savage

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