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H. Bryer, Prater, Blidge street, Blachfriais, London.

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Watson's Useful Compendinn 1072

FINE ARTS.
Combe's Description of Ancient Ter-
racottas

1206
Milner's Treatise on the Ecclesiastica!

Architecture of England during the
middle ages

1166
Observations on the varieties of Archi-

tecture used in Parish Churches - 1166

Whittington's Historical Survey of the

Ecclesiastical Antiquities of France 1166

HISTORY,

De Molerille's Chronological Abridz.

ment of the History of Great Britain 1065

Macpherson's History of European

Commerce in the East Indies 771

Roberts's Translation of the Welsh

Chronicle of the Kings of Brita n - 1151

Rodd's History of Cha.ls the Great - 1071

Secret History of the Court of King

Jaanies the First

708

LIST OF WORKS RECENTLY PUBLISUCD, 765,

860, 975. 1079, 1191, 129 5.
LITERARY INFORMATION, 763, 839, 974,
1073, 1089, 129 4.

MATUDMATICS,
Cole's Stereogoniometry, and Leeway
and Magnetic Sailings

1077
Hachette's Traitė Elementaire des
Machines

- 1267

Lea's Treatise on the Resolution of

the Higher Equations in Algebra 703

BIOGRAPIY.

Biographie Modern«, or Lives of the

French Revolutionists

713

Hess's Life of Zuinglius, the Swiss
Reformer

928

Hodgson's Life of Bishop Portcus 756

Life of Whitefield

1232
Memoirs de Sophia, Margrave de
Bari-ith

1012

Mudford's Life of Cumberland

839

Saunders's Life of Gunn

1145

Select Remains of the late Rev, E.

White

1059

Trail's Account of the Life and Wri-
tings of Robert Simpson

. 1131
Williams's Life of Percival

971
BRITISH and Foreigy BIBLE SOCIETY.
DIarsh's Ivquiry into the consequences

of neglecting to give the Prayer
Book with the Bible

1209
Dealtry's Exainination of Marsh's
Inquiry

1209

Vansittart's three Letters to Dr. Marsh

and Mr. Coker

1209

Simeon on the Excellence of the L:-

turgy

1209

Marsh's Letter to Mr, Vansıttart 1209

Maltby's Thoughts on the Plans of

the Bible Society

1210

Cunningham's Observaticns on Di.

Maltby's Thoughts

1210

EDUCATION AND SCHOOL Books,

Anecdotes of Children and Young

Persons

971

Poardmau's Vocabulary

852

Bradley's Phaedri Fabulæ, cum Notis

Angiicis

968

Pride's Petit Rhetoricien Français

7.69
Chapman's Oratory

853

Clarke's New System of Arithmetic 1072

Crabb's German Extracts

970)

First Lessons in English Grammar

1183

Pamphlets on National Education, viz.

Bell's Report of the Military Asy-
Jurn at Madras- Lancaster's Brit sh
System of Education-Report of J,
Lancaster's Progress froin 1799-
Fox's Comparative View of the Plans
of Education, by Bell and Lancaster
-Marsb's Serinon on National E!
( ation-Marsh's Vindication o: Dr.
Bull-Origin, Progress, and Object
of the new System of Education

071, 783

Rippingham's Rules for Roglisii Com-

position

1185

Renard's Practical Arithmetic u 80

St. Quentin's Gran, mar oi the French

Language

761

Şt. Qiren'in's Rudiments of General

Grammar

856

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Forster's Physiological Reflections - 1186

Sunders on the Diseases of the Eye - 898

MISCELLANEOUS,

Bigland's Philosophical Wanderers - 762

Christian Reader's Guide, a charac-

terist:c Catalogue

1198

Clarke's Account of Charities belong.
ing to the Poor of Norfolk

1071

Cottage Sketches, or Actie Retire.

ment

92

Drake's Essays ilustrative of the
Rambler, Adventurer

954

Drake's Gleaner, a series of periodical

Essays

1141

Druiii, (the) a Yolume of Essays 1284

Ed eworil's Tales of fashionable
Lite, vol. 4, 5, and 6

979
Geo raphical, Pultical, and Commer-
cial Es-ays

- 1179
teruies, the lastructed

857
Klaproth's Archives of Asiatic Litera-

858

Malcolm's Miscellaneous Anecdutes -

Manisy's Essay on the Preservation of

S:1pwrecked Persijas

1288

.

jaki Gel's Instinct Displayed

32002

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-

Murray's Enquiries respecting the on the Books of Origen against

character of Nations, and the pro-

Celsus

TOS

gress of Society

807 Ewing's Essays, Addressed in Jets 1118

Oliscrvations on Peace with France 1074 Freeston's Inquiry into the file

Sixth Report of the African Institu-

and Efferte of Socinianisia

849

tion

1273 Gandolpby's Defence of the Ancicut

Wilson's Conversations with Belling.

1159
ham
965 Guru's Sermons and Letters

1145

NATURAL HISTORY AYD PHILOSOPHY.

Gyles on the Authenticiiy of the New

Tament

972

Evelyn's Srlva, or a Disoourse of Fo. Marshall's Pious Selections

963

rest Trees

1108

Remarks ou two particulars in a Refu.

Farey's General View of the Agricul.

tation of Calvinism

- 1182

ture and Minerals of Derbyshire, Warner's Scripture Characters

918

Vol. 1.

824

Winter's Thoughts on Subscription to

Hooker's Morograph of British Jun-

Arucics of Faith

758

germannia

851

Kosmo!ogsche Geschichte der Natur 972

Sermons.

Sowerby's Mineral Conchology

762

Memoirs of the Caledonian Horticul-

Brichan's Sermons on various subjects 1227

tural Society

966

Claytun's Sermon on the dreadful Sin

Philosophical Transactions of the

of Suicide

970

Royal Society abridged

1000 Cox's Sermons at lackney--the Na-

Pinkerton's Petralogy, a Trentise on

ture, Causes, and Consequences of

Rocks

1018

Apostacy

1180

Thompson's History of the Royal

Early Piety, a Sermon for Sunday

Society

- 1000

Schools

1071

Transactions of the Geological Society 1253

Giey's Serinon occasioned by the

Walker's Essays on Natural History

Death of Dr. Garthshore

118$
and Rural Economy

696

Hall's Sermon tue Discouragements
Walton's Historical Account of Pcry.

' and Supports of the Christian Mi-
vian Sheep

1069
nister

668
Liefchild's Serinons--the Evil and
TOETRY.

Danger of Fickleness in Religious
Aikin's Essays on Song Writing 910 Opinions

760

--- Vocal Poetry

910

Mant's Discourses delivered

at the

Bristow's Poems

1071
Bampton Lecture, 1812

1035
Colton's Napoleon, a poem
1183 Stokes's Twelve Sermons

805
Coleman's Poetical Pagaries

1077 Vaughan's Visitation Sermons at Lei-.

Crabbe's Tales

1240 cester

$19

Dog in the Manger, an old Fable with Winter's and Collyer's Sermons before
a new application

756 the Friends of the Academy at Ho.

Gloria in Excelsis, &c.

1292 merton

968

Crenville's Portugal, a Poem in lio

TRAVELS

parts

1172

Heining's Themes of Admiration, and Aslie's Commercial and Geographical
other Poems
1073 View of the Brazils

1073
Tlolloway's Country Pastor or Rural Clarke's Travels in Asia, Africa,
Philanthropist

1183 Greece, Egypt, and the Holy Land 1093
Mitford's Agnes, the Indian Captive, Dewar's Observations on the Customs
with other Poems
855 of the Irish

1195
Peacock's Philosophv of Nelancholy 10:0 Fenton's Tour through Pembrokeshire 867
Pentycross's Witenham Hill, a Poin

976
Ga't's Voyages and Travels

729
Plumptre's Letters to Dr. Aikin on his Haensel's Letters on the Nicobar
Vocal Poetry
910 I lands

709
Rowden's Poetical Introduction to the

Mawe's Travels in the Interior of

Study of Butany

854 Brazil

Mereditha's Account of the Gold Coast

THEOLOGY

of Africa

1052

Barry's Friendly Call to Truth and Semple's Sketch of the present State

Reason

U156

689

of Caraccas

Bellamy's History of all Religions 1290 Sketches of Java

816

Bennet's Devout Meditations from the Smith's 'Tour to Hafod in Cardigan-

Chrstion Oratory

964 shire

6S $

Conuing bam's Hulearr Prize Essay Zimincrman's Australia

940

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Art. I. Report of the Military Male Orphan Asylum at Madras, with

its original Proofs and Vouchers, as transmitted from India in 1796,
and published in London in 1797, under the title of an Experiment în
Education. A new edition. To which are subjoined additional Docu.
ments and Records illustrative of the progress of the new system of
education, in the school in which it originated, and of its fruits in the
character conduct and fortunes of its pupils. By the Rev. Andrew Bell,
D.D. L.L. D. F. A.S. F. R. S. Ed. Master of Sherburn Hospital,

Durham. 810. pp. xxx. 126. Murray, 1812.
Art

. II. The British System of Education, being a complete epitome of the
improvements and inventions practised at the Royal Free Schools,
Borough Road, Southwark. By Joseph Lancaster 8vo. pp. xvii, 56.

1806. Longman and Co. 1810.
Art. III. Report of J. Lancaster's Progress from the rear 1798, with

the Report of the Finance Committee for the Year 1810. To which is
prefixed an Address of the Committee for promoting the Royal Lan-
casterian System for the Education of the Poor. 8vo. pp. 41. Printed

by J. Lancaster, at the Royal Free School Press. Southwark. 1810.
Art

. IV. A Comparative View of the Plans of Education, as detailed
in the Publications of Dr. Bell and Mr. Lancaster ; with Remarks on
Dr. Bell's “Madras School," and Hints to the Managers and Com.
mittees of Charity and Sunday Schools, &c. By Joseph Fox. The

third edition. 8vo. pp. 67. Darton and Harvey. 1811.
Art. V. The National Religion the Foundntion of National Education.

A Sermon, preached in the Cathedral Church of St: Paul, London,
on Thursday, June 13, 1811. To wh is added a Collection of Notes,
containing Proofs and Illustrations. By Herbert Mirsh, D. D. F. R. S.
Margaret Professor of Divinity in the University of Carnbridge.
Published at the Request of the Society for promoting Christian

Knowledge. The Fitih Edition. 8vo. pp. 33. Rivingtons. 1811,
Art. VI. A Vindication of Dr. Bell's System of Education, in a Series

of Letters, by Herbert Marsh, D. D. &c. 8vo. pp. 32. Rivingtons. 1811.
Art. VII. The Origin, Nature, and Object, of the New System of Edu-

cation. 12mo. Pp. 210. Murray. 1812.
IN this country it is no longer a question whether the poor

should be educated. It is now the settled conviction of all
Vol. VIII.

3 I

intelligent persons, that the mischiefs to social order and the subordination of ranks, which a dastardly policy so confidently predicted would arise from the general diffusion of knowjedge, were perfectly visionary: They have not failed to observe, what was in itself so obvious, that, while the poor receive the advantages of education, and thereby rise somewhat higher in the scale of rational existence, the superior instruction to which the rich will in consequence have recourse, will always preserve a sufficient distance between the classes into which society is distributed. They are satisfied, it is only despotic governments that have reason to be alarmed at the intellectual improvement of their subjects. Free states, on the contrary, whose principal object is the prosperity and happiness of the people, must be indebted for their permanence and stability, to a general persuasion of their utility; a persuasion which will be sure to take deeper root, as the mass of the subjects are well instructed, and thus enabled to áttach themselves to the civil polity, not so much from prejudice and custom, as from a clear perception of the benefits it affords them.

The affectation of charity, which objected to the education of the poor, from the evils in which, it was pretended, knowledge would involve them, has likewise sunk into contempt. That education is injurious to the poor, as it serves to proinote indolence and vanity, is now universally 'regarded as among the most groundless of suppositions. Knowledge does not provide food for the hungry, or clothing for the naked. Industry is quite as necessary after instruction, as it was before ; and the only difference is, that those who have been instructed, are able to turn the fruits of their labour to the best account. Nor is the other part of the charge more substantial. As education becomes general, its advantages cease to become excitements to vanity, since no man is vain of what he has in common with his neighbours. Nothing can be more untrue than the assertion, which was at one time sọ vehe. mently reiterated, that the diffusion of knowledge is the diffusion of misery. It is, on the contrary, the 'property of knowledge to elevate and refine our nature; to enable a man to find satisfaction in his own bosom,-and, not only to produce a taste for intellectual delights, but to destroy the keen relish for gratifications purely sensual. Contemplate man, as a being capable of religioir, and designed for conscious existence in a future state, and it will appear still more desirable that he should be well educated, whatever be his condition in life : while of the charity that it becomes us to cultivate as Christians, there cannot be a more appropriate object than the education of the poor. To them an especial regard has

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