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Of nicely-calculated less or more;
So deemed the man who fashioned for the

sense

To live, and act, and serve the future

hour; And if, as toward the silent tomb we go, Through love, through hope, and faith's

transcendent dower, We feel that we are greater than we

know.

10

MUTABILITY

(1821)

These lofty pillars, spread that branching

roof Self-poised, and scooped into ten thousand

cells, Where light and shade repose, where

music dwells Lingering — and wandering on as loth to

die; Like thoughts whose very sweetness

yieldeth proof That they were born for immortality.

SCORN NOT THE SONNET

(1827)

From low to high doth dissolution climba And sink from high to low, along a scale Of awful notes, whose concord shall not

fail; A musical but melancholy chime, a Which they can hear who meddle not with crime, a

5 Nor avarice, nor over-anxious care. e Truth fails not; but her outward forms

that bear e The longest date do melt like frosty

rime, a That in the morning whitened hill and

plain c And is no more; drop like the tower

sublime a Of yesterday, which royally did wear c His crown of weeds, but could not even

sustaina Some casual shout that broke the silent

air, a Or the unimaginable touch of Time. a

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INSIDE OF KING'S COLLEGE CHAPEL, CAMBRIDGE

(1821)

Tax not the royal Saint with vain ex

pense, With ill-matched aims the architect who

planned Albeit laboring for a scanty band Of white-robed scholars only — this im

Soul-animating strains — alas, too few!•f

THE TROSACHS

(1831)

mense

And glorious work of fine intelligence! 5 Give all thou canst; high Heaven rejects

the lore

There's not a nook within this solemn

Pass,
But were an apt confessional for one

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5

Feed it 'mid Nature's old felicities,
Rocks, rivers, and smooth lakes more clear

than glass
Untouched, unbreathed upon.

Thrice happy quest, If from a golden perch of aspen spray 10 (October's workmanship to rival May) The pensive warbler of the ruddy breast That moral sweeten by a heaven-taught

lay, Lulling the year, with all its cares, to rest!

MOST SWEET IT IS WITH UN

UPLIFTED EYES

(1833) Most sweet it is with unuplifted eyes To pace the ground, if path be there or

none, While a fair region round the traveller

lies Which he forbears again to look upon; Pleased rather with

soft ideal scene, The work of Fancy, or some happy tone Of meditation, slipping in between The beauty coming and the beauty gone. If Thought and Love desert us, from that

day Let us break off all commerce with the

Muse: With Thought and Love companions of

our way, Whate'er the senses take or may refuse, The Mind's internal heaven shall shed her

dews Of inspiration on the humblest lay.

10

“THERE!” SAID A STRIPLING, POINTING WITH MEET PRIDE

(1833)

IF THIS GREAT WORLD OF JOY

AND PAIN

(1833)
If this great world of joy and pain

Revolve in one sure track;
If freedom, set, will rise again,

And virtue, flown, come back:
Woe to the purblind crew who fill

The heart with each day's care; Nor gain, from past or future, skill

To bear, and to forbear!

5

"There!" said a stripling, pointing with

meet pride Towards a low roof with green trees half

concealed, "Is Mosgiel Farm; and that's the very

field Where Burns ploughed up the Daisy."

Far and wide A plain below stretched seaward, while,

descried Above sea-clouds, the Peaks of Arran

rose; And, by that simple notice, the repose Of earth, sky, sea, and air, was vivified. Beneath “the random bield of clod or

stone" Myriads of daisies have shone forth in

flower Near the lark's nest, and in their natural

hour Have passed away; less happy than the

5

10

NOT IN THE LUCID INTERVALS

OF LIFE

(1831) Not in the lucid intervals of life That come but as a curse to party-strife; Not in some hour when Pleasure with a

sigh Of languor puts his rosy garland by; Not in the breathing-times of that poor

slave

one

That, by the unwilling ploughshare, died

to prove The tender charm of poetry and love.

5

BLEST STATESMAN HE, WHOSE MIND'S UNSELFISH WILL

55

Who daily piles up wealth in Mammon's

cave

Is Nature felt, or can be ; nor do words, Which practised talent readily affords, Prove that her hand has touched respon

sive chords; Nor has her gentle beauty power to

5

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Truths whose thick veil Science has drawn

aside? No, - let this age, high as she

may, instal In her esteem the thirst that wrought

man's fall, The universe is infinitely wide; And conquering Reason, if self-glorified, Can nowhere move uncrossed by some new

wall Or gulf of mystery, which thou alone, Imaginative Faith! canst overleap, In progress toward the fount of Love,

the throne Of Power whose ministers the records

keep Of periods fixed, and laws established,

less Flesh to exalt than prove its nothingness.

With genuine rapture and with fervent

love The soul of Genius, if he dare to take Life's rule from passion craved for pas

sion's sake; Untaught that meekness is the cherished

bent Of all the truly great and all the inno

cent.

10

15

20

BLEST STATESMAN HE, WHOSE MIND'S UNSELFISH WILL

(1838)

Blest statesman he, whose mind's unselfish

will Leaves him at ease among grand thoughts:

But who is innocent? By grace divine, Not otherwise, O Nature! we are thine, Through good and evil thine, in just degree Of rational and manly sympathy. To all that Earth from pensive hearts is

stealing, And Heaven is now to gladdened eyes re

vealing, Add every charm the Universe can show Through every change its aspects under

go Care may be respited, but not repealed; No perfect cure grows on that bounded

field. Vain is the pleasure, a false calm the

peace, If He, through whom alone our conflicts

cease, Our virtuous hopes without relapse ad

vance, Come not to speed the soul's deliverance; To the distempered intellect refuse His gracious help, or give what we abuse.

whose eye

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30

Sees that, apart from magnanimity, Wisdom exists not; nor the humbled skill Of Prudence, disentangling good and ill 5 With patient care. What tho' assaults

run high, They daunt not him who holds his min

istry, Resolute, at all hazards, to fulfil Its duties;

prompt to move, but firm to wait, Knowing, things rashly sought are rarely

found; That, for the functions of an ancient

State Strong by her charters, free because im

bound, Servant of Providence, not slave of Fate Perilous is sweeping change, all chance

unsound.

10

DESIRE WE PAST ILLUSIONS TO

RECALL?

(1833)

Desire we past illusions to recall?
To reinstate wild Fancy, would we hide

PROTEST AGAINST THE BALLOT

(1838)

SAMUEL TAYLOR

COLERIDGE
(1772-1834)

THE RIME OF THE ANCIENT

MARINER

(1797-98)

IN SEVEN PARTS

5

Part I

Forth rushed from Envy sprung and Self

conceit, A Power misnamed the Spirit of Reform, And through the astonished Island swept

in storm, Threatening to lay all orders at her feet That crossed her way. Now stoops she

to entreat License to hide at intervals her head Where she may work, safe, undisquieted, In a close box, covert for Justice meet. St. George of England! keep a watchful

eye Fixed on the suitor; frustrate her request

10 Stifle her hope; for, if the State comply, From such Pandorian gift may come a pest Worse than the dragon that bowed low his

crest, Pierced by thy spear in glorious victory.

5

It is an ancient Mariner, And he stoppeth one of three. "By thy long grey beard and glittering eye, Now wherefore stopp'st thou me? “The Bridegroom's doors are opened

wide, And I am next to kin; The guests are met, the feast is set: May'st hear the merry din.” He holds him with his skinny hand, “There was a ship,” quoth he. "Hold off! unhand me, grey-beard loon!" Eftsoons his hand dropt he. He holds him with his glittering eye — The Wedding-Guest stood still, And listens like a three years' child: The Mariner hath his will.

10

WHO PONDERS NATIONAL EVENTS SHALL FIND

(c. 1842)

15

20

5

or

Who ponders national events shall find
An awful balancing of loss and gain,
Joy based on sorrow, good with ill com-

bined, And proud deliverance issuing out of pain And direful throes; as if the All-ruling

Mind,
With whose perfection it consists to

dain
Volcanic burst, earthquake, and hurricane,
Dealt in like sort with feeble human kind
By laws immutable. But woe for him
Who thus deceived shall lend an eager

hand To social havoc. Is not Conscience ours, And Truth, whose eye guilt only can make

dim; And Will, whose office, by divine com

mand, Is to control and check disordered powers?

The Wedding-Guest sat on a stone:
He cannot choose but hear;
And thus spake on that ancient man,
The bright-eyed Mariner.
"The ship was cheered, the harbor cleared,
Merrily did we drop
Below the kirk, below the hill,
Below the lighthouse top.
“The Sun came up upon the left,
Out of the sea came he!
And he shone bright, and on the right
Went down into the sea.
"Higher and higher every day,
Till over the mast at noon
The Wedding-Guest here beat his breast,
For he heard the loud bassoon.

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10

30

35

“In mist or cloud, on mast or shroud, 75 It perched for vespers nine; Whiles all the night, through fog-smoke

white, Glimmered the white Moon-shine.” "God save thee, ancient Mariner! From the fiends, that plague thee

thus! Why look'st thou so ?” — "With my cross

bow I shot the Albatross !”

40

80

Part II

The bride hath paced into the hall,
Red as a rose is she;
Nodding their heads before her goes
The merry minstrelsy.
The Wedding-Guest he beat his breast,
Yet he cannot choose but hear;
And thus spake on that ancient man,
The bright-eyed Mariner:
"And now the Storm-blast came, and he
Was tyrannous and strong:
He struck with his o'ertaking wings,
And chased us south along.
“With sloping masts and dipping prow, 45
As who pursued with yell and blow
Still treads the shadow of his foe,
And forward bends his head,
The ship drove fast, loud roared the blast,
And southward aye we fled.
"And now there came both mist and snow,
And it grew wondrous cold;
And ice, mast-high, came foating by,
As green as emerald.
"And through the drifts the snowy clifts 55
Did send a dismal sheen:
Nor shapes of men nor beasts we ken
The ice was all between.

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“The fair breeze blew, the white foam

few, The furrow followed free: We were the first that ever burst 105 Into that silent sea.

70

“And a good south wind sprung up behind;
The Albatross did follow,
And every day, for food or play,
Came to the mariners' hollo!

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