Зображення сторінки
PDF
ePub

PART TWO: THE MIDDLE NINETEENTH CENTURY

5

me.

JOHN HENRY, CARDINAL FLOWERS WITHOUT FRUIT NEWMAN

(June 20, 1833) (1801-1890)

Prune thou thy words, – the thoughts

control THE PILLAR OF THE CLOUD

That o'er thee swell and throng: (June 16, 1833)

They will condense within thy soul,

And change to purpose strong.
Lead, kindly Light, amid the encircling
gloom,
But he who lets his feelings run

5 Lead Thou me on;

In soft luxurious flow, The night is dark, and I am far from Shrinks when hard service must be done, home,

And faints at every woe. Lead Thou me on. Keep Thou my feet: I do not ask to see Faith's meanest deed more favor bears, The distant scene - one step enough for Where hearts and wills are weighed, 10

Than brightest transports, choicest prayers,

Which bloom their hour and fade.
I was not ever thus, nor prayed that Thou
Shouldst lead me on;

R. C. TRENCH
I loved to choose and see my path, — but

(1807-1886)
Lead Thou me on.

RETIREMENT
I loved the garish day, and, spite of fears,
Pride ruled my will: remember not past

A wretched thing it were, to have our years.

heart

Like a thronged highway or a populous So long Thy power hath blest me, sure it street, still

Where every idle thought has leave to Will lead me on,

meet, O'er moor and fen, o'er crag and torrent, Pause, or pass on, as in an open mart; till

Or like a roadside pool, which no nice The night is gone, And with the morn those angel faces Has guarded that the cattle may not beat smile,

And foul it with a multitude of feet, Which I have loved long since, and lost Till of the heavens it can give back no awhile.

part.

now

10

15

art

5

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

Permission first his heavenly feet to

lave; Then lay before him all thou hast. Allow No cloud of passion to usurp thy brow, Or mar thy hospitality; no wave Of mortal tumult to obliterate The soul's marmoreal calmness. Griet

should be, Like joy, majestic, equable, sedate; Confirming, cleansing, raising, making

free; Strong to consume small troubles; to

commend Great thoughts, grave thoughts, thoughts

lasting to the end.

THOMAS WADE

(1805-1875)

THE TRUE MARTYR The martyr worthiest of the bleeding

10

name

nor

BENJAMIN DISRAELI, EARL OF BEACONSFIELD

(1804-1881)

Is he whose life a bloodless part fulfils:
Whom racks

tortures tear, nor poniard kills, Nor heat of bigots' sacrificial flame; But whose great soul can to herself proclaim

5 The fulness of the everlasting ills Wherewith all pained Creation writhes

and thrills, And yet pursue unblenched her solemn

aim: Who works, all knowing work's futility, Creates, all conscious of ubiquitous

death, And hopes, believes, adores, while Destiny Points from Life's steep to all her graves

beneath, Whose thought 'mid scorching woes is

found apart, Perfect amid the flames, like Cranmer's

heart.

WELLINGTON

(c. 1849)

10

Not only that thy puissant arm could

bind The tyrant of a world and, conquering

Fate, Enfranchise Europe, do I deem thee great; But that in all thy actions I do find Exact propriety: no gusts of mind 5 Fitful and wild, but that continuous state Of ordered impulse mariners await In some benignant and enriching wind, The breath ordained of Nature. Thy

calm mien Recalls old Rome, as much as thy high

deed: Duty thine only idol, and serene When all are troubled; in the utmost need Prescient; thy country's servant ever seen, Yet sovereign of thyself, whate'er may

speed.

10

AUBREY DE VERE

(1814-1902)
SORROW

(1842) Count each affliction, whether light or

grave, God's messenger sent down to thee; do

thou

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]
« НазадПродовжити »