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ROUSSEAU (J. J.): 100 n., 104 n., Smith (Adam): 6, 15 n., equal

133, 134, 141, 161, 167 n., 168 distribution of happiness 61,
(Rousseau and Mandeville)

on wealth 92, improvements
181 Note, state of nature 186, 93, natural liberty 96, original
Swiss ideal 187, influence on state of things 101, relation
Godwin 199, 200, 203, (Kant) to Hutcheson 113, more in-
279, (Fichte) 285, (Hegel) dividualist than Hume 116,
311, 317, 322, 333, 363.

on labour 118, predecessors
Roux : on organs of animals 360 n. 129, 130, 140 n., Book II.
Ruge (Arnold): 335.

ch. viii. passim, 185, 195, use
Russia (Hegel in): 329.

of “law” and “principle”

194, followers 199, relation
SADLER (Michael T.): 218.

to Godwin 200, 201, 205 seq.,
Saint Simonians : 239, 329, 333.

to Malthus 210 seq., to Ben-
Savage and civilized man: 93, 94, tham 215, 216, 221, to J. S.

138, 154, 181 Note, 207 (cf. Mill 240, 241, 258, to Kant
213), 259, 349.

270, 271, 275, 276, 309,
Sax (Prof. Emil) : 18 n., 180 n., (Proudhon) 331, (Marx) 339,
219 n., 316 n.

(Hegel) 221, summary 382
SAY (J. B.): 218, 309, 331.

seg.
Sceptic: (Hume's) 113, 116 (cf. Social or customary morality :
125).

(Hegel) 307.
SCHÄFFLE (Prof. A.): 299. Social Science : (J. S. Mill) 240
SCHELLE (G.): 135, 138, 144, seq.
145.

Socialism : (J. S. Mill) 254 seg.
SCHELLING (F. W. J.): 298.

German-See Books IV.
SCHILLER: 317 n.

and V. passim.
SCHMIDT (Oskar): 361 n.

Society : spontaneous growth 5,
SCHMOLLER (Prof. G.): 156 n., 15, (Plato) 23, 24, ruled by
295 n.

custom 25, 26, distinct from
School life : (Hegel) 308.

state 30, 46, (Epicureans) 48,
SCHULZE-DELITZSCH : 353.

Stoics 50, (Grotius) 72, 73,
Selection : sexual 360; natural, see 75, (Locke) 96, 99, 100,
Nature.

(Hume) 121, (Physiocrats)
SENIOR (W. N.): 258.

139, (Ad. Smith) 148, 159.
SHAFTESBURY (Lord): 109, 380.

seq., 163, 174, 179, spon-
SHELLEY (P. B.): 200 n.

taneous 184, (Rousseau) 185,
SiDGWICK (Prof. Henry): 218.

relation to rights 188, (God-
SIÈYES (Abbé): 335 n.

win) 200 seq., (Bentham) 228,
Silver : the best money (Kant) (J. S. Mill) 259, (Kant) 272,
275. See also Money.

(Hegel) 310 seg.
SIMONIDES : 26.

SOCRATES : 17, 18, 21, 36 n., 47,
Sin and atonement: (Ad. Smith) 48.
182.

Sophists : 16, 72 n., 78.
SKARZYNSKI (Dr. W.): 181 Note. | SPENCER (Herbert): 16, 196 Note,
Slavery : (Plato) 21, 27, 28, 29, 218, 300, 362, 389.

(Aristotle) 34, 36, 376, replaced SPINOZA : 60, 76, 86, cf. 388.
by machines 35, (Stoics) 49, Sponte acta : 24, 85 (cf. 96), 102,
(Christianity) 53, 353, (More) 123, 124, 133, 215, 220, 221,
64, (Grotius) 74 (cf. 107 n.), 252, 309, 318, 363, 372, cf.
141, (Hegel) 303, 315, 374, 394.
(Engels) 349, 350.

| Standard of comfort : (More) 64,

as

65, (Malthus) 212, 213, Theology : natural theology (Ad.
(Fichte) 288. See also Ne- Smith) 148, 150 (cf. 162,
cessaries.

182), (Malthus) 206, (J. S.
State: distinguished from Mill) 251, (Kant) 307, (Hegel)

Society 5, 15, 24, 30, 46, 50, 323, (Marx) 338, (Engels)
State a necessary develop- 347, (Lassalle) 351.
ment

43,

from contract THOMPSON (Perronet) : 227 n.,
(Epicurus) 49, Christian and

232 n.
Stoic 51, analogy of body THOMPSON (William ): 336 n.
and members (Grotius and

Time : in economics 114 seq., 355,
Hobbes) 52, 74 seq., 79, not 356, cf. 358, 363-4.
like household 81, (cf. 41), Tolstoi (Count Leo): 21.
(Harrington) 86, (Locke) 98 TRACY (Destutt de): 218.
seq., 378, (Hume) 121, (Ad. Trades Unions and Guilds :
Smith) 148, 174 seq., 178, (Fichte) 286, (Hegel) 313 seq.
(Rousseau) 185, in relation TRENDELENBURG (A.): 196 Note,
to rights 188, 189, (Kant) 297.
272 seg., (Fichte) 281, State TSCHERNISCHEWSKY (N.G.): 330 n.
as educator 296, (Hegel) 308, TUCKER (Abraham): 105.

310 seq., struggle of States 366. TUCKER (Josiah) : 129 Note.
Statistics: (Kant) 277, (Fichte) 289. TURGOT (A. R. J.): 129, 134, 135,
STAHL (F. J.): 75, 100 n.

141, 142, 144, 154, 160, 195,
STEUART (Sir James) : 137 n., 146, 256.

147.
STEWART (Dugald): 136 n., 147, Usury : (Plato) 22, (Aristotle) 38,
152, 180, 182.

(Canon law) 53, (More) 65,
STIRLING (Dr. Hutchison): 323 (Bacon) 67, (Grotius) 76,
Note.

(Harrington) 89, (Bentham)
Stoics : Book I., ch. iii. passim, 215.
also 51, 54, 161, 169, 271,

Utility : final 219, 299.
375, 377.

Utilitarianism: ancient 49, 72,
Hume's “Stoic” 116.

modern (Hobbes etc.) 85, 86,
STRAUSS (D. F.): 347.

(Locke) 98, theological 103,
Struggle for existence : 78, 205, 104, (Hume) 108, 122 seq.,
210, 358 seq., 366, 367.

(Ad. Smith against) 164, 167,
SUAREZ: 98.

168, (Godwin) 201, (Malthus)
SWIFT (Jonathan) : 173, 199.

207, 209, 212, 213, Book III.
SYDNEY (Algernon): 98.

ch. ii. passim, (J. S. Mill) 247
Sympathy : (Hume) 108, 124, seq., 261, sum of pleasures
(Ad. Smith) 164 seq.

380, 385 seq.

Utopias : not at all times alike 64,
TAINE (H. A.): 265 n.

210, in contrast with scien-
Taxation : (Bodin) 68, (Hobbes)

tific socialism 329, 331 (cf.
81, 83, (Harrington) 88, 345, 346, 387).
(Locke) 96, 100, (Hume)
117, 129, (Quesnay) 137, 140, Value : (Plato) 20, 21, (Aristotle)
(Ad. Smith) 180, 384, (J. S. 37, 40, (Grotius) 74, (Hobbes)
Mill) 262, 263, (Kant) 273, 82, 83, (Locke) 94 seq.,
(Fichte) 289, 294, (Hegel) (Hume) 118 seq., (Quesnay)
311, (Lassalle) 351.

137, 138, (Ad. Smith) 156,
Teleology : 170, 221, 279.

158, 384, (Ricardo) 212 (cf.
THALES : 11, 38 n.

74), 368, 387, (Malthus) 212,

E E

(Fichte) 281, 292, (Hegel)
321, 322 (cf. 79 n.). See also

Hobbes, Grotius.
WATT (James) : 183 Note.
Wealth: (Plato) 12 seq., (Aristotle)

32 seq., (Epicurus) 48, (Stoics)
50, (Christianity) 53, (Machi-
avelli) 60, (More) 62 seq.,
(Hobbes) 84, (Harrington)
87, (Locke) 91 seq., (Hume)
107, desire of 111, wealth not
happiness (Hume) 112, 113,
(Quesnay) 135 seq., (Ad.
Smith) 153 (cf. 161), not
happiness (ib.) 172, abstractly
considered 178, (James Mill)
230, (J. S. Mill) 245, 248,
(Marx) 341, 379, in view of

development 362, 368.
Women : (Plato) 28, 376, (Aris-

totle) 35, (Stoics) 49, (Con-
dorcet) 204, (Bentham and J.
S. Mill) 240, 387 (cf. Hume
121, 125, 126), (Kant) 272 n.,

(Engels) 349, 350.
XENOPHON : 18 n., 21 n., on divi-
sion of labour

31

Note.

ZELLER (Prof. Eduard) : 48 n., 49.
ZEYSS (Dr. R.): 181 Note.
ZUCKERKANDL (Dr. Robert): 97 n.

(Bentham) 215, (J. S. Mill)
246 seq., (Kant) 275, (Fichte)
288 seq., (Hegel) 303, in rela-
tion to property 369, in latest
economics 386, 391 (cf. 369),
in terms of theology (Proud-
hon) 331 n., (Marx) 336, 341.

Surplus Value: Book V.

1. passim.
VAUBAN (Sebastian): 133.
Venice: ballot etc. 87 seq.
VERRI (Pietro): 137 n., 218.
Vices : public benefits. See Man-

deville.
Vico (J. B.): 364.
Virtues : intellectual (Hume) 124

(cf. 108), 172 (cf. 201).
Voigt (Moritz): 72 n.
VOLTAIRE (Arouet de): 141, 186.

Wages : high and low 117, 118,

154, 159, Fund 258, (Kant)
274, in food (Fichte) 289,
(Hegel) 303, (Lassalle) 350,
(Marx) 341, 342, 343, dyn-

amical view 355.
WAGNER (Prof. A.): 7, 374 n.
WAGNER (Richard): 248, 370,

371.
WALLACE (A. R.): 214, 358, 360 n.
WALLACE (Dr. Robert): 205.
War: (Kant) 276 seq., 387,

Butler & Tanner, The Selwood Printing Works, Frome, ond London.

76

ERDMANN'S HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY.

NOTICES OF THE PRESS.

"A SPLENDID monument of patient labour, critical acumen, and admirable methodical treatment. It is not too much to predict that, for the library of the savant, for the academical student, whose business it is to be primed in the wisdom of the ages, and for the literary dilettante, who is nothing if not well up in things that everybody ought to know,' these volumes will at once become a necessity for purposes, at least, of reference, if not of actual study

.... We possess nothing that can bear any comparison with it in point of completeness.” Pall Mall Gazette.

" It is not necessary to speak of the great merits of Erdmann's History of Philosophy. Its remarkable clearness and comprehensiveness are well known.

The translation is a good, faithful rendering, and in some parts even reaches a high literary level.”—Professor JOHN WATSON, in The Week, of Canada.

“ It is matter of real congratulation, in the dearth still of original English or American work over the whole field of historical philosophy, that by the side of the one important German compend of this generation, the other, so well fitted to serve as its complement, is now made accessible to the English-speaking student.”— Mind.

“ It has been long known, highly esteemed, and in its successive editions has sought to make itself more worthy of the success it has justly achieved. Erdmann's work is excellent. His history of mediæval philosophy especially deserves attention and praise for its comparative fulness and its admirable scholarship.

It must prove a valuable and much-needed addition to our philosophical works."-Scotsman.

“The combination of qualities necessary to produce a work of the scope and grade of Erdmann's is rare. Industry, accuracy, and a fair degree of philosophic understanding may give us a work like Ueberweg's ; but Erdmann's history, while in no way superseding Ueberweg's as a hand book for general use, yet occupies a different position. Erdmann wrote his book, not as a reference book, to give in brief compass a digest of the writings of various authors, but as a genuine history of philosophy, tracing in a genetic way the development of thought in its treatment of philosophic problems. Its purpose is to develop philosophic intelligence rather than to furnish information. When we add that, to the successful execution of this intention, Erdmann unites a minute and exhaustive knowledge of philosophic sources at first hand, equalled over the entire field of philosophy probably by no other one man, we are in a condition to form some idea of the value of the book. To the student who wishes, not simply a general idea of the course of philosophy, nor a summary of what this and that man has said, but a somewhat detailed knowledge of the evolution of thought, and of what this and the other writer have contributed to it, Erdmann is indispensable ; there is no substitute.”— Professor JOHN DEWEY, in The Andover Review.

“It is a work that is at once compact enough for the ordinary student, and full enough for the reader of literature. At once systematic and interesting.”Journal of Education.

“The translation into English of Erdmann's History of Philosophy is an important event in itself, and in the fact that it is the first in stalment of an under. taking of great significance for the study of philosophy in this country. Apart, however, from its relation to the Library to which it is to serve as an introduction, the translation of Erdmann's History of Philosophy is something for which the English student ought to be thankful.

A History of past endeavours, achievements, and failures cannot but be of great use to the student. Such a His. tory, able, competent, trustworthy, we have now in our hands, adequately and worthily rendered into our mother-tongue.”—Spectator,

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