Mental and Moral Science: A Compendium of Psychology and Ethics

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Longmans, Green, and Company, 1868 - 850 стор.

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Quick movements their exciting character
9
The search after Knowledge
10
Desire
12
The several indications mutually check each other
19
FEELINGS OF MOVEMENT Рдаг
23
SENSE OF TOUCH
35
The Language of the Feelings has to be acquired
36
The Naturalist mind represents disinterested association
42
Touch an intellectual Sense The Objects solid bodies
43
SENSE OF HEARING
51
THE APPETITES
67
Muscles of the Body generally
73
Law of Selfconservation
79
guity
85
Statement of the Law ib MOVEMENTS 3 Spontaneous and Instinctive actions strengthened by exercise
86
Conjoined or Aggregated Movements ib 5 Successions of Movements
87
Intervention of Sensations in trains of Movement ib 7 Conditions governing the rate of Acquisition generally ib 8 Circumstances favouring the adhes...
88
All acquirements suppose Physical Vigour
89
Association of Ideas of Movement ib 11 The seat of Ideas the same as of Sensations or Actualities ib 12 The tendency of Ideas to become Actualities ...
90
The principle applied to explain Sympathy
91
Points common to the Idea and to the Actuality
92
Separate ideas become selfsustaining by repetition ib 20 Association of Sensations of Touch
94
Law of the Rate of Acquirement in Touch ib 22 The acquirements of Touch most numerous in the blind
95
Forms and Coloured surfaces
97
SENSATIONS OF DIFFERENT SENSES
98
Movements with Sensations Muscular Ideas with Sensations Architecture Sensations with Sensations
99
Law of the Rate of such acquirements
100
Localization of the Bodily Feelings
101
Our body is an object fact with subject associations
102
Pleasure and Pain can persist and be reproduced ideally ib 31 Law of the association
103
The Special Emotions converted into Affections
104
Ritual ib 34 The interest of Ends transferred to the Means Money Formali ties Truth
105
Influence of association in Fine Art Alisons Theory
106
ACQUISITIONS OF LANGUAGE
117
The complex current of each ones existence
124
Impediment of Diversity Special condition for this case 130
130
Sight Colours Forms and their combinations 136
136
Successions identified under diversities Cycle Evolution Cause
143
Figures of Similitude abound in all great works of literary
149
MIXED CONTIGUITY AND SIMILARITY
155
CONSTRUCTIVE ASSOCIATION
161
Constructing new muscular ideas Hitting a mark Archi
165
Construction of Sentences
168
PRACTICAL CONSTRUCTIONS
171
i Material
177
THE ORIGIN OF KNOWLEDGE EXPERIENCE AND INTUITION PAGK 1 Question as to the existence of Intuitive or Innate truths
181
Importance attached to the Intuitive origin of knowledge ib 3 Characters ascribed to Innate principlesNECESSITY and UNI VERSALITY
182
Innate ideas improbable
184
Innate general ideas would require innate particulars ib 7 The character of Necessity has nothing to do with Innate origin ib 8 Concessions of the sup...
186
the Theory of Vision and the Percep tion of the External and Material World
188
Two views of our Perception of Distance by sight ib 3 The native sensibility of the eye includes 1 Light and Colour 2 Visible Figure and Visible Mag...
189
The visible signs of variation of Distance from the eye ib 5 The import of Distance is something beyond the ocular sensations
190
Experience associates the visible signs of Distance with the movements that give the meaning of Distance
191
Distance an inference Experiments of Wheatstone ib 8 The perception of Distance illustrated by the Stereoscope
192
Admission by Berkeleys opponents that the instinctive percep tion is aided by associations
193
Objection to the theory of Acquired Perception that we are not conscious of tactual or locomotive reminiscences
194
Observations on persons born blind and made to see
195
Instinctive Perceptions of the Lower Animals ib 14 Observations on infants
196
Hypothesis of hereditary transmission of the perception
197
I The putting forth of Muscular
199
HUME Summary of his philosophical doctrines generally
207
CHAP IV
216
THE DEVELOPMENT OF FEELING
224
EMOTION OF TERROR
227
TERROR definedThe apprehension of coming evil 232
234
The PHYSICAL side involves 1 Touch 2 the Lachrymal
240
SPECIES OF THE TENDER EMOTION
243
EMOTIONS OF SELF
250
Selfcomplacency and the Love of Admiration as motives
256
the pleasure of malevolence
262
Feeling in the Actual often thwarted by the accompaniments
287
Music
296
Beauty and Sublimity of Natural Objects Human Beauty
302
associated emotions or affections
309
The causes of Laughter
315
CONTROL OF FEELINGS AND THOUGHTS 1 All voluntary control is through the muscles
338
CONTROL OF THE FEELINGS 2 The power of the Will confined to the muscular accompaniments
339
SYMPATHY
340
COMMAND OF THE THOUGHTS 4 The medium is the control of Attention
341
The will has power over muscular movements in idea
342
Command of the thoughts may be acquired ib 7 Enters into Constructive Association
343
Command of the Thoughts a means of controlling the Feelings
344
Power of the Feelings to influence the Thoughts
346
Prospective pleasures and pains Circumstances of ideal persistence
347
Money Bodily Strength Knowledge Formalities Virtues
349
The Will biased by Fixed Ideas
351
THE CONFLICT OF MOTIVES 1 Conflict of concurring pleasures and pains
354
Spontaneity may oppose the motives to the Will 00 ib 3 Exhaustion a bar to the influence of Motives
355
Opposition of two Motives in the Actual ib 5 Conflict between the Actual and the Ideal
357
Intermediate Ends in conflict
358
RESOLUTION is postponed action
363
1 the wants of the system 2
369
Belief attaches to the pursuit of intermediate ends
375
Belief in the order of the World varies with the three elements
382
PRUDENCE DUTY MORAL INABILITY
392
The perplexity of the question is owing to the inaptness of
398
LEIBNITZ Necessity is hypothetical or absolute Hypothetical
415
necessity Reid Liberty defined Arguments in support of Freewill
421
ETHICS
429
The BONUM SUMMUM BONUM or Happiness
432
CHAP II
433
The Ethical End is limited according to the view taken of Moral
438
of the operation of 1 Prudence 2 Sympathy and 3
453
PART II
460
PLATO Review of the Dialogues containing portions of Ethical
471
Book Second Definition and classification of the Moral virtues
481
Book Fourth Liberality Magnificence Magnanimity Mild
490
SENSATION
496
Grounds of Friendship
506
EPICURUS Life and writings His successors Virtue and vice
525
THE NEOPLATONISTS The Moral End to be attained through
535
HOBBES Abstract of the Ethical part of Leviathan Constitu
543
CUMBERLAND Standard of Moral Good summed up in Benevolence
556
and Punishments secondary and additional Our Duties
562
CHAP III
566
LOCKE Arguments against Innate Practical Principles Freedom
573
affecting the moral good or evil of actions Rights and Laws
580
THE MORAL FACULTY
584
MANDEVILLE Virtue supported solely by selfinterest Compassion
593
PRICE The distinctions of Right and Wrong are perceived by
617
HARTLEY Account of Disinterestedness The Moral Sense a pro
633
STEWART The Moral Faculty an original power Criticism
639
Brown Moral approbation a simple emotion of the mind Univer
651
BESTHAM Utility the sole foundation of Morals Principles
659
MACKINTOSH Universality of Moral Distinctions Antithesis of Page
677
AUSTIN Laws defined and classified The Divine Laws how
685
WHEWELL Opposing schemes of Morality Proposal to reconcile
697
BAILEY Facts of the human constitution that give origin to moral
714
SPENCER Happiness the ultimate but not the proximate
721
Cousin Analysis of the sentiments aroused in us by human
740
JOUFFROY Each creature has a special nature and a special
746
The Brain is the principal organ of Mind Proofs
1
Question whether the Moral Faculty be simple or complex 448
2
Mode of action in the first place an optical effect
3
Higher Combinations of language
5
Incarrying and outcarrying nerves
7
HOPE and DESPONDENCY are phases of Belief
10
ARISTOTLE Enters his protest against separating Universals from
13
THE STOICS Their alteration of the Categories 21
21
An outburst of feeling passes through a certain course
22
CHAP XII
27
Browx A general word designates certain particulars together
30
32
32
Oral Language involves the Voice and the
49
Short methods of acquiring language
55
BOOK I
57
KANT His position as between the opposing schools Maintained
58
Supposed faculty of SelfConsciousness
61
Events narrated have the aid of the Verbal Memory
67

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Сторінка 209 - For my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure. I never can catch myself at any time without a perception, and never can observe anything but the perception.
Сторінка 98 - I think, is a thinking intelligent being, that has reason and reflection, and can consider itself as itself, the same thinking thing, in different times and places...
Сторінка 551 - The RIGHT OF NATURE, which writers commonly call jus naturale, is the liberty each man hath, to use his own power, as he will himself, for the preservation of his own nature; that is to say, of his own life; and consequently, of doing anything which in his own judgment and reason he shall conceive to be the aptest means thereunto.
Сторінка 704 - The creed which accepts as the foundation of morals, Utility, or the Greatest Happiness Principle, holds that actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness, wrong as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness.
Сторінка 661 - Nature has placed mankind under the governance of two sovereign masters, pain and pleasure. It is for them alone to point out what we ought to do, as well as to determine what we shall do.
Сторінка 552 - From this fundamental law of nature, by which men are commanded to endeavour peace, is derived this second law; that a man be willing, when others are so too, as far forth, as for peace, and defence of himself he shall think it necessary, to lay down this right to all things; and be contented with so much liberty against other men, as he would allow other men against himself.
Сторінка 709 - In an improving state of the human mind, the influences are constantly on the increase, which tend to generate in each individual a feeling of unity with all the rest ; which, if perfect, would make him never think of, or desire, any beneficial condition for himself, in the benefits of which they are not included.
Сторінка 30 - ... consider some particular parts or qualities separated from others, with which, though they are united in some object, yet it is possible they may really exist without them. But I deny that I can abstract...
Сторінка 205 - The table I write on I say exists, that is I see and feel it, and if I were out of my study I should say it existed, meaning thereby that if I was in my study I might perceive it, or that some other spirit actually does perceive it.
Сторінка 707 - Being rational creatures, they go to sea with it ready calculated ; and all rational creatures go out upon the sea of life with their minds made up on the common questions of right and wrong, as well as on many of the far more difficult questions of wise and foolish.

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