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ONE OF THE commissionERs of His MAJESTY's customs
IN SCOTLAND ; -

AND FORMERLY PROFESSOR OF MORAL PHILOSOPHY
IN THE UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW.

witH AN Account of

HIS LIFE AND WRITINGS
BY DUGALD STEWART,

**ofessor or Moral philosophy IN The UNIversity, AND
FEllow or Tii E Royal Society, of EDINBURGH,
&c. &c. &c.

IN FIVE VOLUMES.

VOL. I.

F----------L ON DO N :

**** for t. capell and w. Davies; F c. AND J. Rivington; othings *** *on; F wisgrave; LoNGMAN, Hunst, Rees, or ME, AND BRowN; '0EN Richardson ; J. Booker; B crosby; E. Jeffery w. stewarr; BLACK, PARRY, AND kungsbury; s. BAGster ; J. MAwMAN; J. AsperNE ; **** A. schuley : AND w. CReech, AND BELL AND BRADFure, AT EDINBURGH: *

Stratuo and Prelton, Primerj-Strett, Londdu. CONTENTS

OF

THE FIRST VOLUME.

THE THEORY OF MORAL
SENTIMENTS.

PART I.

OF THE PROPRIETY OF ACTIONS.

SECT. I.

QF the Sense of Propriety - Page i

Chap. I. 0/"sympathy - - ibid.

Chap. II. Of the Pleasure os mutual Sympathy IO
Chap. III. Of the manner in which we judge os the
propriety or impropriety of the Affeilions of other Men,

by their concord or dijsonance with our own - 16

Chap. IV. The same subjetl continued - - 21

Chap. V. Of the amiable and respe&able virtues 30

SECT. II.

Of the Degrees of the different Passions "which
are consistent with Propriety - - 36

Introduction - ibid.

Chap. I. Os the Passions which take their origin

from the body - - - "37

y A 2 Chap. II-
Chap. II. Of those Passions which take their origin

from a particular turn or habit of the Imagination Page 44
Chap. III. Of the unsocial Passions - - 50

Chap. IV. Of the social Passions 9
Chap. V. Of the selfish Passions - 62

SECT. III.

Of the Effefts of Prosperity and Adversity
upon the Judgment of Mankind with \re-
gard to the Propriety ofAdion; and why
it is more easy to obtain their Approbation
in the one fate than in the other - 69

Chap. I. That though our sympathy with sorrow is
generally a more livelysensation than our sympathy with
joy, it commonlyfalls much morefhort of the violence of
what is naturally fit by the person principally concerned ibid.

Chap. II. Of the origin of Ambition, and of the dis-
tinclion of Ranks - - 80

Chap. III. Of the corruption of our moral sentiments,
which is occasioned by this disposition to admire the rich
and the great, and to despise or negleEl persons of poor
and mean condition - - - 98

PART II.

OF MERIT AND DEMERIT; OR, OF THE OBJECTS
OF REWARD AND PUNISHMENT.

SECT. I.

Of the Sense of Merit and Demerit - 108
Introduction - ibid.

Chap. I. That whatever appears to be the proper ob-
jecl of gratitude, appears to deserve reward: and that,

in

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