Зображення сторінки
PDF
ePub

p. 65

P. 86

100

23. The simple and primary colours but 44. To find what kind of salt, whether

few.

acid, volatile, or fixed, predominates

24. The Sun's light stain'd with the co in an assign'd liquor or saline body.

lours of transparent bodies in paffing

ihrottem.

ib.

45. One body changed into more, of diffe-

Pi

25. Apparent colours cumprund as the rent colours, by a colourless ingredient.

genuine.

66

89

26. Experiments made with a colour'd 46. Changes of colours produced in a dry,

prism.

67 white body, by Spring water. 91

27. Limpid liquors may afford coloured 47. A permanent colour produced by a

vapours.

ib. particular arrangement of parts. 92

28. Several ways of producing a green 48. Various colours produced in differene

with a blue and yellow.

68

parts of the same liquor.

ib.

29. The manner where in this colour may 49. Changes of colour may greatly depend

possibly be produced.

69 upon the peculiar texture of the men-

30. The mixture of every yellow and struum.

94
every blue will not afford a green. 70 so. The different colours of metals in
31. The colours of the rain-bow exhibited different states.

95
in very thin substances.

ib. 51. An easy method of examining ores.

3 2. Syrup of violets, and the juice of

blue-bittles, by a change of colour, 52. The way of making counterfeit gems.

diftinguish an acid from an alkali. 71

ib.

33. The produ&tion of a blue colour. 73 53. Mineral solutions may give different

ib.

colours from their own.

35. What quantity of a limpid liquid a 54. The method of preparing a yellow ve-

pigment may tinge.

74

getable lac.

ib.

36. Acid, alkaline, and urinous Salts, 55. Alum, being a strong matter, dissol

change the colours of many vegetable ved by' acid, may, when used as a
produktions.

ib.

precipitant, be, itself, precipitated.

37. Changes of colour by digestion, &c.

particularly a redness.

77

38. Different effects of an acid, in the

A free enquiry into the vulgar

production of colours, reconciled. 80

notion of nature.

39. The colours of the fumes of bodies,

and of the substances they form, obser-

ved in distillations, &c.

ib.

SECT. I.

40. Various changes of colour, caused by 1. HE vulgar notion of nature

saline Spirits, in the tin&tures of vege prejudicial to religion and phi-

tables.

81 losophy.

106

41. A colour instantly generated, and 2. The great ambiguity of the word na-
perfe&tly destroy'd.
83

109
42. The chymical reason of this pheno 3: Means of avoiding this ambiguity.

The preceding experiment varied. 4. Whether the nature of a thing be the

85 law it receives from the creator? 111

ture.

menon.

116

5. Aristotle's definition of nature ab-

SECT II.

fcure and unsatisfactory. P.112 3. Whether final causes are to be ex-

pected in all

, or only in fome particular

SECT. II.

bodies ?

p.159

6. The received notion of nature, what? 4. Evident marks of defign in the struc-

113

ture of the eyes, and other parts of ani-

7. A new notion of nature, general and

mals.

161

particular, advanced.

ib. 5. Chance, an imaginary being. 166

8. Il effects of the vulgar notion of na-

6. Revelation allows us to Speak more
ture upon religion.

ib. positively of final causes than natural

9. Reasons against admitting the vulgar

philosophy.

168

notion of nature.

10. The reasons whereon the vulgar notion

SECT. III.

of nature depends, examined.

7. How inanimate bodies may at for

I 23

11. The vulgar notion of a crisis exami-

ends wherewith they are unacquainted.

ned.

129

170

SECT. IV.

SECT. III.

8. How final causes are to be consider’d.

12. Axioms about nature, how far, and

172

in what sense, to be admitted. 134 9. As to the celestial bodies. 172

13. Whether every nature preserves it 10. And those that are terrestrial. 175

Self?

ib. 11. 'Tis often allowable from the manifest

14. Whether nature never fails of her and apposite uses of the parts of animal

end?

135 bodies, to collect some of the particular

15.

Whether nature always acts by the ends, for which the creator defign'd

Sportest ways?

136 them: and in some cases from the

16. Whether she always does what is known nature and stru£ture of the

137 parts, to draw probable conje&tures about

17. Whether nature abhors a vacuum ? the particular offices of them. 177

138 12. It is rational from the manifest fit-

18. Whether nature cures diseases ? 140 ness of some things to cosmical or ani-

19. Whether nature be a substance or an mal ends, to infer, that they were

accident, body or Spirit?

145

thereto ordain'd by an intelligent agent.

20. The use and advantages of this en-

180

quiry.

1.48 13. We ought not to be hasty in conclu-

ding upon the particular use of a

An enquiry into the final causes

thing, or the motive which induced the

of natural things.

author of nature to frame it in a pecu-

liar manner.

191

SECT. I.

14. The naturalift Mould not suffer the

Hether the final causes of na

search, or discovery of final causes, to

tural things are knowable

make him undervalue or neglect the

to men ?

enquiry after their efficients. 194

150

2. Final causes, what they may fignify.

151

à 2

Things

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

2 II

250

Things above reason consider'd.

3. The immortality of the soul. p. 241

4. And settling the belief of a divine

SECT. I.

providence.

242

Hings above reason of three

5. Experimental philosophy draws the

kinds.

mind

from sensual things.

P.197

246

2. Incomprehensible.

ib.

6. Gives it a docility.

247

3. Inexplicable.

ib.

7. And a fitness for searching into

4. Unfociable.

198

deep truths.

247

5. Privileg'd things, what? ib.

8. Experimental philosophy leads to the

6. The imperfection of the human mind.

christian religion, in particular. 248

ib.

9. Different kinds of experience

. 249

7. After what manner human reason 10. Personal

.

ib.

alts.

11. Historical.

ib.

8. Whether men may, with justice, dif- 12. And theological or Supernatural. ib.

course of things above reason?

13. We ought to believe several things

204

upon the information of experience,

SECT. II.

mediate and immediate, which without

9. Rules for judging of things above

that information, we should judge un-

reason.

fit to be credited ; or antecedently to

10. The first rule.

ib. it, actually judg'd contrary to reason.
II. A second rule.

213
12. A third rule for judging of things 14. We ought to have a great and pár-
above reason.

ticular regard to these things that are

214

13. A fourth rule.

216

recommended to our belief, by what we

14. Reafon, what?

reduce to real, tho' supernatural ex-

15. A fifth rule.

perience.

253

16. The fixth and last rule for judging of
things above reason.

225
The high veneration man's in-

telleet owes to God.

The philosophical difficulties

relating to the resurrection,

consider’d.

butes and perfe&tions unknown

264

Reliminary observations.

2. Effects of the divine power.

229

266

2. Identity; the difficulties of 3. The vast magnitude of the whole
conceiving it.

ib.
material world.

ib.
3. The grand objection against the Re 4. The prodigious quantity of motion
surrection.

given thereto and maintain'd therein.

231

4. Answer'd.

ib.

267

5. The wisdom of God differently ex-

The christian virtuoso.

preled.

269

6. In the various contrivances of ani-
Xperimental philosophy leads to mal bodies.

ib.
religion, in general. 239 7. In the mutual usefulness of his

2. By discovering the existence of God. ductions to each other.

270

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

8. And in the forming and governing 7. Paradox VI.

other Systems besides the solar. p. 270 The direct prelure sustain’d by a body,

9. Still greater instances of power and placed any where under water, with

wisdum, in the formation and govern its upper surface parallel to the hori-

ment of immaterial beings. 274 zon, is that of a column of water,

10. Great instances of wisdom in the re whose base is the horizontal superficies

demption of man.

275 of the body, and height the perpendi-

11. The immense difference between the cular depth of the water : and if the

creator and his creatures.

275 water pressing upon a body be contained

12. The superiority of the divine know in open tubes, its pressure is to be esti-

ledge to that of man.

ib. mated by a column of the same, the bafe

13. The obligation men are under to ve whereof equals the lower orifice of the

nerate and coniemplate God.

277 pipe, and height a perpendicular from

14. The manner wherein this is to be thence to the top of the water : and

done.

280 this tho' the pipes stand obliquely, be

irregularly Maped, or wider in some

STATICS.

parts than the said orifice. P.303

8.

Paradox VII.

Hydrostatical paradoxes proved A body immersed in a fluid, Sustains a

and illustrated by experi-

lateral preure therefrom ; which in-

ments.

creases with the depth whereto it is

plunged.

307

and Lemmata.

Ostulata

Paradox VIII.

9.

Water will as well depress, as support a

Paradox I.

In all fluids, the upper parts gravitate

body Specifically lighter than itself.

on the lower.

287

309

Paradox II.

3.

Paradox IX.

A lighter fluid will gravitate upon a Notwithstanding, the doctrine of pifitive

heavier.

levity, an oil, lighter than water,

293

Paradox III.

may be kept immersed in that fluid.

If a body be wholly, or in part, immersed

310

below the surface of water, its lower to

Paradox X.

part will be presed upwards by the The ascent and flux of water in fiphons, ,

water contiguous to it, from beneath.

are explicable, without supposing a

Fuga vacui.

ib.

296
Paradox IV.
5.

Paradox XI.

A competent presure of an external fluid The most ponderous body we know, im-

is alone sufficient to raise the water in

mersed in water to a depth exceeding

that of twenty times its own thickness,

pumps.

300

6. Paradox V.

will float, if it be there fenced from

The presure of an external fluid will keep

the direct presure of the incumbent

an heterogeneous liquor suspended at the

fluid.

311

Same height, in tubes of very different

bores.

301

Hydro-

285

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

318

And shew the genuineness and purity

Hydrostatics applied to ores, and

of bodies.

p. 329

to the Materia medica.

25

This method of examination applied

SECT. I.

to fluids heavier than water, and un-

apt to mix therewith ; for instance, to

Ofils, their medicinal virtue

whence ?

mercury.

330

p. 314 26. To powders and fragments of bodies.

2. A new way of examining them hy-

331

drostatically.

ib.

To bodies that will diffolve or mix

3. Its foundation

ib.

with water.

332

4. Examples to illustrate the do&trine.

28. Another way of finding the Specific

315

333

gravity of fluids.

5. Preliminary observations with regard

334

29. The several uses thereof.

to fosils.

ib.
6. To distinguish marcasites from

30. Still other methods for the same pur-

talline ures.

pole.

336

317

The use and advantages of weighing

7. Directions to find the best flux-pow-

ders for ores.

one fluid in another.

337

8. Directions relating to the manage-

32. Al waters nearly of the same weight.

338

ment of the hydrostatical balance. ib.

33. To discover the magnitudes of bodies

9. The hydrostatical balance applied to

hydrostatically.

ib.

ores, and fiift to gold-ore.

32 1

10. Al minerals should be carefully exa-

34. To gain the solidity of a body hydro-

mined, and if ponderous, hydrostati-

statically, tholighter than water. 339

35. What accuracy is to be expected in
cally.

323

11. Hiw to examine earths or soft sub- 36. A table of the specific gravities of

hydrostatical experiments. 342

stances, hydrostatically.

324

bodies compared with water.

12. Colour'd sands and gravel

.

344

ib.

13. Ores in general, and that of lead in

particular.

An hydrostatical discourse, by

325

SECT. II.

way of answer to the objec-

14. The hydrostatical balance applied to

tions of Dr. More and others,

the Materia medica ; and first to

against fome explanations of

the Lapis Hæmatites.

particular experiments; with

15. To the Lapis Lazuli.

farther considerations thereon.

16. The magnét.

327

17. Calamine.

ib.

SECT. I.

18. Red coral.

ib.

Echanical solutions of pheno-

ib.

347

20. Calculi Humani.

2. That the upper parts of fluids gra-

21. And bezoar,

ib.

vitate upon the lower.

22. The hydrostatical balance will diftin 3. Demonstrated by experiments. 350

guish between bodies of the same deno Water made to support a body of a

mination.

ib.

much

greater Specific gravity than it-

23. Between genuine stones and counter felf.

353

feit.

ib.

5.

4-

« НазадПродовжити »