The Sonnets of William Shakspere

Передня обкладинка
C. K. Paul & Company, 1881 - 251 стор.

З цієї книги

Відгуки відвідувачів - Написати рецензію

Не знайдено жодних рецензій.

Вибрані сторінки

Зміст

Lord of my love to whom in vaſſalage
26
Weary with toil I haſte me to my bed
27
XXVIIL How can I then return in happy plight
28
When in diſgrace with fortune and mens eyes
29
When to the ſeſſions of ſweet filent thought
30
Thy boſom is endeared with all hearts
31
If thou ſurvive my wellcontented day
32
Full many a glorious morning have I ſeen
33
Why didſt thou promiſe ſuch a beauteous day
34
No more be grieved at that which thou haſt done
35
Let me confeſs that we two muſt be twain
36
As a decrepit father takes delight
37
How can my Muſe want ſubject to invent
38
O how thy worth with manners may I ſing 39
39
Take all my loves my love yea take them all
40
Thoſe pretty wrongs that liberty commits
41
That thou haſt her it is not all my grief
42
When moſt I wink then do mine eyes beſt ſee
43
If the dull ſubſtance of my fleſh were thought
44
The other two flight air and purging fire
45
Mine eye and heart are at a mortal war
46
Betwixt mine eye and heart a league is took
47
How careful was I when I took my way
48
Againſt that time if ever that time come
49
How heavy do I journey on the way
50
Thus can my love excuſe the flow offence
51
So am I as the rich whoſe bleſſed key
52
LIÁ What is your ſubſtance whereof are you made
53
O how much more doth beauty beauteous ſeem
54
Not marble nor the gilded monuments PAGE
55
Sweet love renew thy force be it not ſaid
56
Being your Nave what ſhould I do but tend
57
That God forbid that made me firſt your ſlave
58
If there be nothing new but that which is
59
Like as the waves make towards the pebbled ſhore
60
Is it thy will thy image ſhould keep open
61
Sin of ſelflove poſſeſſeth all mine eye
62
Againſt my love ſhall be as I am now
63
When I have ſeen by Times fell hand defaced
64
Since braſs nor ſtone nor earth nor bound leſs ſea
65
Tird with all theſe for reſtful death I cry
66
Ah wherefore with infection ſhould he live
67
Thus is his cheek the map of days outworn
68
Thoſe parts of thee that the worlds eye doth view
69
That thou art blamd ſhall not be thy defect
70
No longer mourn for me when I am dead
71
O how I faint when I of you do write
80
Or I ſhall live your epitaph to make
81
grant thou wert not married to my Muſe
82
never ſaw that you did painting need
83
Who is it that ſays moſt? which can ſay more
84
Or whether doth my mind being crownd with you
114
Thoſe lines that I before have writ do lie
115
Let me not to the marriage of true minds
116
that I have ſcanted all
117
Like as to make our appetites more keen
118
What potions have I drunk of Siren tears
119
That you were once unkind befriends me now
120
Tis better to be vile than vile efteemd
121
Thy gift thy tables are within my brain
122
No Tine thou ſhalt not boaſt that I do change
123
If my dear love were but the child of ſtate
124
Weret aught to me I bore the canopy
125
CXXVI O thou my lovely boy who in thy power
126
CXXvið In the old age black was not counted fair
127
cxxvin How oft when thou my muſic muſic playſt
128
The expenſe of ſpirit in a waſte of ſhame
129
My miſtreſs eyes are nothing like the ſun
130
Thou art as tyrannous ſo as thou art
131
Thine eyes I love and they as pitying me
132
Beſhrew that heart that makes my heart to groan
133
So now I have confefld that he is thine
134
Whoever hath her wiſh thou haſt thy Will
135
If thy ſoul check thee that I come ſo near
136
Thou blind fool Love what doft thou to mine eyes
137
When my love ſwears that ſhe is made of truth
138
O call not me to juſtify the wrong
139
Be wiſc as thou art cruel do not preſs
140
In faith I do not love thee with mine eyes
141
Love is my ſin and thy dear virtue hate
142
Lo as a careful houſewife runs to catch
143
Two loves I have of comfort and deſpair
144
Thoſe lips that Loves own hand did make
145
Poor ſoul the centre of my finful earth
146
My love is as a fever longing ſtill
147
O me what eyes hath Love put in my head
148
Canſt thou O cruel ſay I love thee not
149
O from what power haft thou this powerful might
150
Love is too young to know what conſcience is
151
In loving thee thou knowſt I am forſworn
152
Cupid laid by his brand and fell aſleep
153
The little Lovegod lying once aſleep
154

Інші видання - Показати все

Загальні терміни та фрази

Популярні уривки

Сторінка 90 - Then hate me when thou wilt; if ever, now; Now, while the world is bent my deeds to cross, Join with the spite of fortune...
Сторінка 107 - Not mine own fears, nor the prophetic soul Of the wide world dreaming on things to come, Can yet the lease of my true love control, Supposed as forfeit to a confined doom.
Сторінка 15 - ... even by the self-same sky, Vaunt in their youthful sap, at height decrease, And wear their brave state out of memory ; Then the conceit of this inconstant stay Sets you most rich in youth before my sight, Where wasteful Time debateth with Decay, To change your day of youth to sullied night ; And all in war with Time for love of you, As he takes from you, I engraft you new.
Сторінка 87 - Farewell! thou art too dear for my possessing, And like enough thou know'st thy estimate: The charter of thy worth gives thee releasing; My bonds in thee are all determinate. For how do I hold thee but by thy granting? And for that riches where is my deserving?
Сторінка 64 - When I have seen the hungry ocean gain Advantage on the kingdom of the shore, And the firm soil win of the watery main, Increasing store with loss and loss with store; When I have seen such interchange of state, Or state itself confounded to decay; Ruin hath taught me thus to ruminate, That Time will come and take my love away.
Сторінка 23 - O'ercharged with burden of mine own love's might. O, let my books be then the eloquence And dumb presagers of my speaking breast, Who plead for love and look for recompense More than that tongue that more hath more express'd.
Сторінка 111 - O, for my sake do you with Fortune chide, The guilty goddess of my harmful deeds, That did not better for my life provide Than public means which public manners breeds. Thence comes it that my name receives a brand, And almost thence my nature is subdued To what it works in, like the dyer's hand.
Сторінка 146 - So shalt thou feed on Death, that feeds on men, And Death once dead, there's no more dying then.
Сторінка 144 - And whether that my angel be turn'd fiend Suspect I may, yet not directly tell; But being both from me, both to each friend, I guess one angel in another's hell. Yet this shall I ne'er know, but live in doubt, Till my bad angel fire my good one out.
Сторінка 103 - To me, fair friend, you never can be old, For as you were when first your eye I eyed, Such seems your beauty still. Three winters cold Have from the forests shook three summers...

Бібліографічна інформація